Australian Property Information (1 - 496 of about 496)

The number of new residential property listings slows down in the lead up to the Easter long weekend

Each year, in the weeks leading up to the Easter long weekend, the number of new listings coming onto the market often slows down. This year has been no exception, with the number of residential properties being added to the market beginning to fall on a week-by-week basis. Across the combined capital cities, the number of new listings coming onto the market over the four weeks ending 22 March was -1.6 per cent lower when compared to the previous rolling four week period and over the week ending 29 March, new listings were a further -4.0 per cent lower. There were 27,238 new capital city properties advertised for sale over the four weeks ending 29 March 2015, -13.3 per cent lower than at the same time last year, however overall stock levels 103,022 across the combined capital cities are just -3.9 per cent lower than they were at the same time last year. Perth 20,409 compared to 17,406 , Darwin 1,452 compared to 1,091 and Canberra 2,344 compared to 1,911 are all recording higher total stock levels than they were at the same time last year, however the number of new listings for each market is lagging behind when compared to the same four week period one year ago which, as mentioned previously, is likely to be attributed to the seasonal slow-down leading up to the Easter long weekend. Across Sydney, the total number of listings over the most recent four week period was recorded at 19,047, down -16.2 per cent when compared to the 22,723 properties available for sale at the same time last year and new listings being added to the Sydney market are currently -20.9 per cent lower than at the same time last year. In Melbourne, total listings are -10.4 per cent lower, -6.0 per cent lower in Hobart, -4.2 per cent lower in Adelaide, while total listings are just -1.5 per cent lower than over the same four week period last year in Brisbane. One interesting thing to take note of is that currently the number of total listings across Perth is higher than the number of listings that CoreLogic RP Data is tracking across the Sydney market. This has generally been the trend since the beginning of the year and it is the first time in the history of tracking listings since 2007 that Perth has had a higher number of properties listed for sale than Sydney. This indicates that stock turnover across Sydney is outpacing the number of new homes coming to the market and can likely be attributed to the strong performance across the residential housing market over the past year. Similarly, Perth’s residential market has shown a slow-down in transactions and value growth since the end of 2013 resulting in less of the listings stock being absorbed. On a national level, over the 28 days ending 22 March 2015, there were 45,039 new residential properties advertised for sale, bringing the total number of houses, units and vacant land properties available for sale across Australia up to 246,708.

Strong clearance rate and record highs for volume in three capital cities

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 29 March 2015 A desire by vendors to sell before Easter and the strong market this year has resulted in record volumes for the year in Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. The results show that the high volumes did not overwhelm demand. The auction market is clearly responding positively to the interest rate cut two months ago. A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 77.5 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 75.9 per cent last week and 67.7 per cent this time last year. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 84.6 per cent was recorded compared to 84.8 per cent last week and 75.9 per cent last year. Buyers responded very well to the high volumes this week and kept the market in boom territory. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate was 78.5 per cent was recorded, compared to 77.1 per cent last week and 66.9 per cent this time last year. Volumes are similar to this time a year ago however more homes have been sold due to strong demand from buyers. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 45.6 per cent was recorded compared to 41.5 per cent last week and 47.1 per cent last year. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 69.1 per cent was recorded compared to 64.6 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 58.1 per cent was recorded compared to 62.1 per cent last week. In Perth a clearance rate of 57.7 per cent was recorded compared to 23.1 per cent last week and 41.7 per cent last year. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

The rate of population growth remains strong but continues to slow

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released its demographic data for the September 2014 quarter yesterday. The data showed that over the quarter, Australia’s population was recorded at 23.581 million persons having increased by 1.5% or 354,605 persons over the past year. The increase in population over the past year was actually the lowest increase in national population over a year since the 12 months to December 2011. Looking at the components of the national population increase, natural increase births minus deaths accounted for a 150,721 person increase in population and net overseas migration contributed to a 203,884 person increase. The 150,721 person natural increase was the lowest annual increase since the 12 months to March 2007 while the additional 203,884 persons due to net overseas migration was the lowest since September 2011. As the first chart shows the sharp slowdown in net overseas migration in particular is having a big impact on the overall national rate of population growth. Looking at population growth across the states, the annual increase in population was greatest in New South Wales NSW 106,365 , Victoria Vic 102,021 , Queensland Qld 69,423 and Western Australia WA 53,691 . Annual population growth was much lower over the year in South Australia SA 14,303 , Australian Capital Territory ACT 4,403 , Northern Territory NT 2,765 and Tasmania Tas 1,602 . Over the past year, 58.8% of total population growth occurred in NSW and Vic. If you add Qld and WA those four states account for 93.5% of total national population growth. In terms of the rate of annual population growth, it is currently strongest in WA 2.1% , Vic 1.8% , Qld 1.5% and NSW 1.4% . Elsewhere, the rate of annual population increase was recorded at 0.9% in SA, 0.3% in Tas, 1.1% in NT and 1.2% in ACT. Although the population of each state is continuing to grow, the rate of growth has slowed across the board. In NSW the annual increase in population was the lowest since June 2013, in Vic it was the lowest since March 2013, in Qld it was its lowest since September 2001 and in WA it was at its lowest level since September 2010. Across the remaining states and territories the rate of population growth in SA was its lowest since September 2011, in Tas it was its lowest since March 2014, in NT it was higher than the previous quarter but lower over the year and in ACT it was at its lowest level since September 2006. If we look at the components of population growth at the state level we get even further insight into the trends taking place. Natural increase is basically a function of the overall population size and as a result natural increase is much greater within the largest states. Over the 12 months to September 2014, the natural increase was recorded at 43,069 persons in NSW, 36,794 in Vic, 34,603 in Qld, 6,932 persons in SA, 21,210 persons in WA, 1,503 persons in Tas, 2,882 persons in NT and 3,706 persons in ACT. Turning to net overseas migration, overseas migrants are finding NSW and Vic the most attractive states in which to settle. Over the 12 months to September 2014, 62.0% of the net gain from overseas migration was recorded in NSW and Vic. Across the individual states the net overseas migration was greatest in NSW 69,601 , Vic 56,772 , WA 32,190 and Qld 28,878 . Across the remaining states and territories net overseas migration was recorded at: 10,304 in SA, 1,065 in Tas, 3,266 in NT and 1,798 in ACT. NSW and Vic have always attracted the greatest number of overseas migrants however, as the chart shows the gap has widened significantly over recent quarters. The profile of interstate migration has also changed significantly over recent years. Qld has historically been the powerhouse in terms of interstate migration however, Vic has now taken that mantle. Over the 12 months to September 2014 only Vic 8,455 , Qld 5,942 and WA 291 recorded positive net interstate migration. On the flipside, each of NSW -6,305 , SA -2,933 , Tas -966 , NT -3,383 and ACT -1,101 recorded a net loss of residents to the other three states. This data set is published from 1981 onwards and over that time NSW has always recorded a net loss of residents to other states and territories however, the outflow is currently at a record low. In Vic, the inflow eased slightly from a record high over the previous quarter. Across the other states and territories, Qld net interstate migration is hovering around the lowest level on record, WA interstate migration is at its lowest level since September 2003 and the outflow of residents to other states and territories in NT is at a record high. The data highlights an overall slowing of the rate of population growth which will undoubtedly have an impact on the wider economy. Economic growth is slower than it has typically been over the past 2 decades and is extremely weak on a per capita basis, lower population growth may exacerbate the slowing of economic growth. Dwelling approvals and construction are at record high levels, as we know over the past decade there hasn’t been an ample supply of new housing. The heightened level of construction will go some way to alleviating housing shortages however, it would take a number of years of heightened construction to totally rectify the shortage. Looking at the data, the rate of population growth has slowed and the fall has been most noticeable across net overseas migration. Those migrants who are coming to Australia are favouring settling in NSW Sydney and Vic Melbourne . This is creating further demand for housing in these cities, so too is the fact that Vic now has the highest net interstate migration of any state and the outflow of residents from NSW is at a record low level. Given this it is easy to see the impact demographics are having on the housing markets and why Sydney and Melbourne are seeing much greater housing demand and housing value growth. Fewer people are leaving those cities, more people are coming from interstate and most coming from overseas are choosing to settle in our two largest cities. On the other hand population growth has slowed significantly in other capital cities, fewer residents are leaving NSW and Vic to settle in these states and territories and they are attracting fewer overseas migrants. With population growth now showing a consistent slowdown since the end of 2012 and new housing supply showing a consistent increase since late 2011, the gap between housing supply and demand has significantly narrowed. It is reasonable to assume that higher supply levels and lower housing demand will eventually dampen the exuberant housing market conditions that are so evident in Sydney and to a lesser extent in Melbourne. It is important to note that to-date the supply-side response has been nowhere near as strong in Sydney as it has been across most other capital cities.

Records for auctions in 2015 in three capital cities

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 29 March 2015 This is a big week nationally for auctions with record volumes for 2015 expected in Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. The rate cut from nearly two months ago will now be having an impact on listings as vendors will have had sufficient time to both decide sell and undertake a marketing campaign. The fact that this is the last week before Easter will also have had an impact on volumes. There are 3,961 auctions expected this week across Australia with 3,323 expected in capital cities. This is compared 2,896 last week and 3,039 for the same week last year. In Sydney 1,343 auctions are expected this week compared to 1,123 last week and 1,163 this week last year. This is the biggest weekend for auctions in Sydney this year but is short of the all time record of 1,631 at the end of November last year. In Melbourne 1,459 auctions are expected compared to 1,333 last week and 1,414 this week last year. Over one thousand auctions in a week have become the norm for the late summer, autumn and spring markets as volumes have risen with buyer demand and sellers have increasingly opted for auctions as a selling method. There are 195 auctions expected in Brisbane compared to 185 last week and 238 this week last year. This week there are 166 auctions expected in Adelaide compared to 112 last week and 107 over the same week last year. This is the biggest weekend for auctions this year in Adelaide. In Canberra there are 84 auctions expected, compared to 74 last week and 51 this week last year. In Perth 56 auctions expected over the coming week, compared to 46 recorded last week and the 55 on this week last year. This is the biggest week of the year for auctions in Perth. Across Australia the highest volume of auctions in one suburb are 29 in Reservoir VIC . Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist

Melbourne Auction Market preview for week ending 29 March

There are 1,459 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,414 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions in a single suburb will be found in Reservoir where 29 are expected. There are 26 scheduled in St Kilda and 24 in Brighton. The compressed autumn auction market, the three weeks between Labour Day and Easter, are delivering excellent results to vendors with clearance rates tracking nearly 10 points above the same time last year while simultaneously showing high volumes. At the end of last year the market appeared to have a slowing trend but the interest rate cut has clearly reversed that. Citywide across the private sale market over the past week the time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell to 31 days, down from 32 days in the previous week. Overall vendor discounting contracted to -5.2 per cent from -5.4 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 22 March: 77.1 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 29 March: 1,459 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 22 March: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 22 March: -5.2 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 11.2 per cent higher in the month ending 22 March seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

One billion dollars a week on Melbourne property in 2014

Key points Over one billion dollars a week was spent of residential real estate last year Brighton recorded the highest spend, $842m Glen Waverley recorded a $233m rise In 2014 a total of $53.7b, over one billion dollars a week, was spent on Melbourne residential real estate. In 2014 a total of $53.7b, over one billion dollars a day, was spent on Melbourne residential real estate. This is an increase from the $52.9b in 2013 and $43.8b in 2012, reflecting the overall growth in the market over the last few years. It is worth noting that last year was still slightly below the all time record of $54b in 2010. The citywide changes are also reflected at a suburban level. Whilst the top 10 Melbourne suburbs ranked by the total spent on residential real estate did not show a lot of change between 2013 and 2014, the amount spent did. Top of the list was Brighton. Last year an average of $2.3m was spent every day in Brighton property purchases and $378,213 more every day than the previous year. This pushed the entire value of sales from $700m to $841m. Brighton may have a higher value of sales than any other suburb, however the increase was dwarfed by the rises recorded in Melbourne, Glen Waverley, Kew and Toorak. In 2013 for instance, $1.49m was spent on units in the suburb of Melbourne and this rose by half a million dollars a day to $2.05m. This rise is partly due to the increased prices being paid and partly the increased construction. Glen Waverley recorded the most significant difference.. Over the course of the year $233m more was spent on houses which in turn pushed the median house price up from $807,000 to $970,000. Neighbouring Mount Waverley also saw a significant rise of $311,747 on a daily basis. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The RBA’s Financial Stability Review and analysis of the housing market

The Reserve Bank RBA released its bi-annual Financial Stability Review FSR earlier today. The document provides a guide as to the RBA’s thoughts on the overall economy and potential risks. As you’d expect, the residential housing market features heavily in their assessment of financial stability and I will delve into some of the key take-outs for the housing market from the document. Housing loan performance The report details that the share of non-performing banks housing loans ie those housing loans which are at least 90 days in arrears on their repayments was extremely low, recorded at around 0.6% in December 2014 which is down from a peak of 0.9% in 2011. The lack of repayment distress across Australian bank mortgage portfolios is being supported by low interest rates which make servicing the mortgage debt easier. The document also states that rising housing prices also make it easier for those home owners in arrears to sell rather than remain in arrears should they run into financial difficulty. It is important to note that while as a general the statement about rising house prices making it easier to sell is true, the housing market performance varies greatly region-to-region. Although selling a home in Sydney and Melbourne is relatively easy currently thanks to strong value growth and high levels of demand, housing market conditions in Perth, Hobart or Canberra are more challenging and it would probably be more difficult to sell a home in these markets. Competition in the mortgage market According to the Report competition has remained rigorous over the past six months. There is plenty of competition amongst lenders and as a result they are offering attractive fixed rates and significant discounts of up to 100 basis points off their advertised variable rates. The RBA has also noted targeted special rates as an example of short-term rate specials for those refinancing with lower LVRs. Banks have also increased commissions being paid to their brokers. As a result, refinancing activity has increased and around 40% to 50% of new housing loans are sourced from brokers. The RBA does raise some concerns that the rising prevalence of the broker channel potentially creates risks, specifically that misaligned broker incentives could create higher levels of lending outside of their risk tolerance. While APRA wrote to Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions ADIs highlighting its guidelines for sound residential mortgage lending late last year, the high level of competition across the banking sector may create issues, particularly in the investor space. Given APRA has indicated that growth in investor housing credit should not be materially above 10% per annum, the significant competition in the market means that those who can’t source an investor loan from one ADI may still have plenty of other ADIs to choose from. Lending criteria The RBA is reporting that serviceability and deposit criteria have been relatively unchanged over the past six months. They acknowledge that some banks have recently applied stricter criteria for some inner-city unit markets and regional towns linked to the resources sector. Despite the lending criteria being largely unchanged, the RBA acknowledge that low mortgage rates and the strength in demand from the investment segment have increased the macroeconomic risks from the housing market. Once again they have acknowledged that investors may amplify housing price cycles and increase the potential for falls in the future. They also note that the rising share of interest-only loans may also increase risks because there is a period over which the principal is not repaid leaving the household with more debt than they would have if they repaid both the principal and interest on the mortgage. It should be noted that while interest rates are low everywhere and investor activity has increased in most states, the sharp rise in investor participation is most prevalent in Sydney and Melbourne. These two cities have seen the strongest growth in home values over recent years, along with the most significant compression of rental yields which has resulted in these cities exhibiting the lowest rental yields across the capital city housing markets. The risks of investors amplifying the market are greatest within these two cities, particularly given the strong value growth coupled with very low rental yields and high investor concentrations. Investor lending The FSR notes that investor housing credit has increased at an annualised rate of 10.5% over the past six months however, it is too early to expect a slowdown in investment lending just yet in response to APRA’s guidelines. The reason being that the pipeline of pre-approvals was already in place before APRA wrote to ADIs in December highlighting a guideline of a cap of 10% annual growth in lending to investors. The RBA notes that investors have contributed to fuelling the rapid growth in home values in Sydney however, the growth has been more moderate outside of Sydney. The FSR states that periods of value growth also increase expectations for further price rises, creating even more demand. A future fall in housing prices would reduce wealth and dampen spending for the broader household sector, particularly for those households with significant housing debt, not just for the investors who contributed to the upswing. The RBA has also raised potential concerns that the surge in lending from the investment segment could lead to excessive new housing construction and a potential future glut in certain areas. While the RBA points out there is little risk of this currently at a national levels, there are some areas of local vulnerability, namely inner-city units in Melbourne and Brisbane. While the RBA has covered off on the risks surrounding heightened levels of investment lending quite well there are a few additional points that need to be made. While investor activity is strongest in Sydney and Melbourne, these two cities already have the lowest gross rental yields. This feeds in to the comment about amplifying the market but is important to understand; investors are chasing capital growth and having little regard for the returns. Secondly, while there are concerns about too much new housing supply in inner-city Melbourne and Brisbane rental growth is already at its lowest level in more than a decade. Although inner-city Melbourne and Brisbane are areas for concern, there is no mention of the fact that rental rates are already falling in Perth, Darwin and Canberra. Furthermore, while both rents and the rate of population growth are falling in Perth there is simultaneously a record high number of dwelling approvals currently. Mortgage characteristics Although low interest rates and the high level of competition in the mortgage market could create risks, the RBA sees little evidence that lending standards have deteriorated. The share of loan approvals above 90% LVR continued to reduce over 2014. The RBA reports that this shift was led by those lenders that previously reported a higher than average share of these types of loans. The profile of new lending indicates that households remain well placed to service their loans. The area that the RBA points out as a concern is the increase in interest-only lending. The rising level of interest-only lending to investors is consistent with tax deductibility of investors’ mortgage interest payments which act as a disincentive to pay down the principal. The banks have suggested that the rise in owner occupier interest-only mortgages has been driven by the borrowers seeking greater flexibility in managing their repayments rather than affordability pressures. Reportedly some of this demand is from owner occupiers who plan to switch their property into a rental property in the future. The RBA also notes that many of these owner occupiers are building sizeable buffers in their offset and redraw facilities. It should also be noted that in principle, interest-only loans should not increase borrowing capacity because consumer protection regulations imply that lenders should assess a borrower’s ability to service principal and interest payments following the expiry of the interest-only period. ASIC is currently assessing compliance with this obligation through its review of interest-only lending. Despite these considerations, interest-only loans – especially for owner-occupiers – pose greater risk to the financial system because they enable borrowers to pay down the principal more slowly than a conventional mortgage. Conclusion The RBA have spelled out a number of key areas of risk surrounding the residential mortgage market. It is clear that the RBA along with APRA and ASIC are closely monitoring the overall market conditions and are on the lookout for risks and an easing of lending standards. While each organisation has stated publicly their concerns and what they are going to do to allay those concerns, it seems unlikely that any significant changes to policies due to these risks for individual ADIs would be communicated publicly.

National clearance rate reaches 77.4% from weekend auctions

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 22 March 2015 After 6 weeks with a clearance rate in the mid to high 70’s sellers in Melbourne, Sydney, Canberra and Adelaide can be quite confident of attaining a good outcome when selling at auction. A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 77.4 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 77.2 per cent last week and 69.4 per cent this time last year. In Sydney demand continues to outpace supply at auction with a preliminary clearance rate of 84.7 per cent was recorded compared to 83.9 per cent last week and 76.1 per cent last year. In Melbourne auction market conditions are very strong and favoring sellers. If this continues post Easter it will begin to impact overall price movements. This week the preliminary clearance rate was 78.1 per cent, compared to 78 per cent last week and 69.4 per cent this time last year. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 52.1 per cent was recorded compared to 47 per cent last week and 37.8 per cent last year. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 73.8 per cent compared to 66.7 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 71.1 per cent was recorded compared to 68.8 per cent last week. In Perth a clearance rate of 17.4 per cent was recorded compared to 41.4 per cent last week and 50 per cent last year. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Auctions as a sales method have increased in all capital cities

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 22 March 2015 There are 3,003 auctions expected this week across Australia with 2,539 expected in capital cities. This is compared to 2,556 last week and 2,466 for the same week last year. With full data now available for 2014 it is clear that the proportion of sales by auction increased in each capital city when compared to both 2013 and 2012. The use of auctions traditionally grows with prices and competition as vendors and agents seek to take advantage of the rising market. The data shows that compared to other recent upswings this cycle is different as all auction records have been broken in Sydney and Melbourne at the same time as there were more than 100,000 auctions in capital cities. In Sydney 947 auctions are expected this week compared to 926 last week and 982 this week last year. Last year 30.2 per cent of sales were by auction, up from 21.8 per cent in 2013 and over double the 14.1 per cent in 2012. In Melbourne 1,202 auctions are expected compared to 1,269 last week and 1,160 this week last year. Last year a remarkable 33.6 per cent of sales were by auction, up from 29.4 per cent in 2013 and 20.3 per cent in 2012. There are 170 auctions expected in Brisbane compared to 132 last week and 130 this week last year. Last year 6.6 per cent of sales were by auction, an increase from 5.7 per cent the year before. This week there are 97 auctions expected in Adelaide compared to 100 last week and 80 over the same week last year. Adelaide saw just over 10 per cent of sales by auction last year up from 8.3 per cent the year before and nearly double the 5.8 per cent recorded in 2012. In Canberra there are 69 auctions expected, compared to 71 last week and 57 this week last year. Last year just over one in five sales were by auction, up from 13.1 per cent in 2013 and only 7.8 per cent in 2012. In Perth auction volumes are set to remain steady, with 45 auctions expected over the coming week, the same as the 45 recorded last week, but up from the 31 over this week last year. Last year a mere 1.8 per cent of sales across the city were by auction. Across Australia the highest volume of auctions in one suburb are 21 in both Reservoir VIC and Thornbury VIC . Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 22 March, 2015

There are 1,202 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,160 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions in one suburb is 21 in both Reservoir VIC and Thornbury Auction volumes are higher than last year and on track to exceed last years volumes when there were more auctions and a higher proportion of homes sold at auction. Our latest data shows that a record 33.6 per cent of sales were by auction in Melbourne last year, up from 29.4 per cent in 2013 and a mere 20.3 per cent in 2012. Remarkably the 30,079 sales at auction last year was near twice the 15,640 recorded in 2012. The increase in use of auctions is a market feature, especially when prices rise as they can deliver better outcomes in competitive markets. In respect of the private sale market in the past week, on a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell to 32 days, down from 33 days in the previous week. Overall vendor discounting was stable at -5.4 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 15 March: 78% Melbourne auctions expected week ending 22 March: 1,202 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 15 March: 32 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 15 March: -5.4% houses Listings being prepared for market are 7.6 per cent higher in the month ending 15 March seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Only 1 out of 100 apartments has 4 bedrooms in Melbourne’s CBD

Key points Across 2013 and 2014 only 1 per cent of apartments advertised for sale in Melbourne had 4 bedrooms Two bedroom apartments are more likely to be found in Southbank and Docklands than Melbourne In Brighton only 9 per cent of apartments had one bedroom It will come as no surprise that there are very few three or four bedroom apartments in the CBD, Docklands or Southbank. Developers frequently cite market demand as the reason why they don’t build larger high-density dwellings. A review of data from the apartments advertised for sale in the past two years shows that the size of dwellings does vary between the three inner city suburbs of Melbourne, Docklands and Southbank. Across those three suburbs, 43 of the 3,966 homes had four or more bedrooms. Three bedroom apartments where rare but slightly more plentiful with 434 advertised for sale. They were mostly found in Southbank and Docklands. Almost one in two apartments in the suburb of Melbourne were one bedroom but they are far less plentiful in Docklands and Southbank, accounting for around 25 per cent of the housing. It is interesting to see the differences in the type of apartments between Melbourne and Docklands/Southbank. From the perspective of the number of bedrooms Docklands and Southbank are the home to larger apartments than Melbourne. One-bedroom apartments accounted for 23 per cent of apartments in Docklands and 28 per cent in Southbank. In the suburb of Melbourne the comparable number is 47 per cent. Clearly, developers are providing different dwellings in different suburbs. This is also obvious when a comparison is made to a very different apartment market such as bayside Brighton where 9 per cent had one bedroom, three bedroom apartments comprised 34 per cent of the market, and two bedroom apartments were the majority at 53 per cent. What is also clear is that if you are looking for a four bedroom unit then it will take a very long time.

What does a 10% cap on growth in investment mortgage lending look like?

Late last year the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA wrote to Australian Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions ADIs reinforcing sound residential mortgage lending guidelines. One of the guidelines related to the growth in investor lending. The letter stated, ‘annual investor credit growth materially above a benchmark of 10 per cent will be an important risk indicator that supervisors will take into account when reviewing ADIs’ residential mortgage risk profile and considering supervisory actions.’ APRA has explained that the approach involves benchmarks, not hard limits. The letter is forward-looking and is about how ADIs should lend in 2015, not about how they have lent in the past. It’s worthwhile to consider the practicality of implementing a cap such as this and what impact it could have on the overall market. APRA publish statistics each month on lending by the Australian banks, note that this data does not cover building societies and credit unions which are also considered ADIs which shows the level of growth for investment housing loans is substantially outpacing growth in loans for owner occupation. At the end of January 2015, there was $1.322 trillion in mortgages outstanding to Australian banks. This figure is made up of $859.645 billion in owner occupier mortgages and $462.358 billion in investor mortgages, indicating that owner occupier mortgages account for 65% of the value of outstanding mortgages and investors account for 35%. The overall value in residential mortgages has increased by 7.9% over the year to January 2015, comprised of owner occupier lending growing by 6.4% and investor lending growing by 10.8%. If we assume that a hard cap was to be introduced whereby the investment segment of the market would be limited to 10% growth per annum, the market as a whole would already be growing above that benchmark. Based on the published data from APRA, the following banks have grown their investment mortgage book at a level above 10% over the past year: Arab Bank Australia, ANZ, Defence Bank, Macquarie Bank, NAB, Police & Nurses Ltd, Police Financial Services Ltd, Suncorp-Metway Ltd, Taiwan Business Bank, Teachers Mutual Bank, Victoria Teachers Ltd and Westpac. There are a few problems surrounding the implementation of a cap on the growth in investment lending which I will now explore. Firstly, investor lending is currently the chief driver of growth in the current market. As mentioned earlier, across all banks, owner occupier mortgages have grown 6.4% over the year compared to 10.8% for investors. There are very few banks recording double-digit growth in owner occupier mortgages. Quite simply, there is currently modest demand from this segment of the market. Even with a firm cap on investment loan growth in place it is unlikely that it would result in a pick-up in owner occupier lending of a significant enough magnitude to offset the expected slowdown in investment lending associated with APRA’s communication. Secondly, a blanket percentage cap overly advantages those that already have a much larger mortgage book and disadvantages those that currently have a smaller investment loan book in relative terms. To put this into perspective, the two banks with the largest portfolio of investor loans; Westpac and CBA, have investor loan books of $146.7 billion and $123.5 billion respectively. Limiting growth to 10% annually would mean they could grow their investment loan books by $14.7 billion and $12.3 billion respectively. If we look at the number 3 and 4 banks nationally for investment loans NAB and ANZ , they have investment loan books of $63.0 billion and $58.5 billion respectively, meaning on an annual basis they could only grow their investment loan books by $6.3 billion and $5.9 billion in order to remain under the 10% cap. What this means is that Westpac and CBA the main competitors to NAB and ANZ could lend more than double the amount to investors than NAB and ANZ could. Further, a bank such as Macquarie, which has only recently re-entered the mortgage industry, is currently growing both their owner occupied and investment loan books well above the 10% pa benchmark as their portfolio is growing from a low base. APRA and the RBA appear intent on limiting the growth in investment lending, however a hard limit such as a 10% cap on the annual growth in lending to investors has its challenges. It is overly advantageous to those that already have a large amount of mortgage lending to investors. The second table shows that investment loans account for 35.0% of all mortgages. Perhaps a better indicator of potential risk is looking at which banks are overweight to investors based on this proportion, as you will note a number of the larger banks are underweight while others show higher investment concentrations. Housing finance data for January 2014 revealed that year-on-year, investment housing finance commitments have increased by 22.1% compared to a 28.5% increase in owner occupier refinance commitments and a -1.1% fall in owner occupier new loan commitments. Clearly the investor segment is a key driving factor in the current housing market, in fact for six consecutive months the value of housing finance commitments to investors has been greater than owner occupier new loans; a trend that has not previously been recorded over the length of the ABS housing finance series. The data on a state-by-state basis and excluding refinances shows that a majority of new lending in New South Wales and the Northern Territory is to investors. The data also reveals 40% or more of all lending was for investment purposes across each state and territory except for Western Australia and Tasmania in January 2015. It shows that there is a significant slant to investor lending currently which helps explain the current focus placed on investment lending by APRA and the RBA. With mortgage rates at record low levels resulting in little returns from risk-free assets, it is no wonder that investors are turning to residential property, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne. The concern should be around future serviceability of these mortgages and the fact that many of these investment properties are recording extremely low yields while the growth in values is currently quite strong, which implies most investors are speculating on further capital gain with little concern for negative cash flow. While there may be room for a cap on the growth in investment mortgage books as we have indicated, it may need to be a more horses-for-courses approach rather than blanket limits in order to truly be effective. The challenge for APRA and the RBA is that something should be done to slow mortgage lending to the investment segment of the market but it is a complex question as to how to implement changes and ensure that lending to this segment slows. Other factors that APRA also may need to consider include serviceability and the level of leverage along with the make-up of the lenders total mortgage book. APRA is attempting to constrain growth across the different geographies and lenders, all of whom have different histories and investment loan profiles, and different risk appetites at present. The key point of any new policy is to keep new lending balanced so as not to permit too much speculation which by implication some of the current investment lending appears to be when you look at the fundamentals.

Highest national clearance rate in 6 years

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 15 March 2015 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 78.3 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 74.5 per cent last week and 70.8 per cent this time last year. This is the highest national clearance rate in 6 years, since 79.7 per cent was recorded in September 2009 and provides a further indication of the improvement in demand since last year. There can be no doubt now that the interest rate cut has had a positive impact on the real estate market. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 85.1 per cent was recorded compared to 84.2 per cent last week and 79.8 per cent last year. Sydney continues to have the strongest auction market nationally and is providing vendors with unprecedented results. In Melbourne the preliminary clearance rate was 77.8 per cent, compared to 75 per cent last week and 67 per cent this time last year. This is the highest clearance rate in a year and half and the market is now well ahead of this time a year ago. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 57.1 per cent was recorded compared to 37.2 per cent last week and 54.5 per cent last year. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 72.9 per cent compared to 60.7 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 73.3 per cent was recorded compared to 70.8 per cent last week. In Perth a clearance rate of 41.7 per cent was recorded compared to 33.3 per cent last week and 41.9 per cent last year. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Capital city auction market improving on 2014

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 15 March 2015 It is already clear that this year is on track to record both a higher number and higher proportion of sales by auction across capital cities. Last year saw 21.5 per cent of all residential sales in capital cities by auction and this was the first time the 20 per cent barrier had been exceeded. It is not a coincidence that it was also the first time there had been more than 100,000 auctions as both Sydney and Melbourne returned strong results. There are 2,679 auctions expected this week across Australia with 2,258 expected in capital cities. This is compared 1,705 last week and 2,293 for the same week last year. In Sydney 777 auctions are expected compared to 944 last week and 868 this week last year. It is unlikely that the clearance rate will drop below 80 per cent this week as stock levels have dropped when demand is still remarkably strong. In Melbourne 1,149 auctions are expected compared to 387 last week and 1,085 this week last year. Melbourne buyers and sellers face a busy three weeks until Easter. With around three in every four homes selling under the hammer the market is favouring vendors. There are 118 auctions expected in Brisbane compared to 164 last week and 138 this week last year. This week there are 97 auctions expected in Adelaide compared to 73 last week and 95 on the same week last year. In Canberra there are 67 auctions expected compared to 83 last week and 57 this week last year. Last week saw the national capital record the fourth consecutive week above 70 per cent for the first time since late 2009. It should be noted that volumes are around twice as high now. In Perth 43 auctions are expected compared to 40 last week and 44 this week last year. Across Australia the highest volume of auctions in one suburb are 22 in Reservoir VIC . Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist

Housing finance eases in January but the proportion of lending to investors hits an all-time high

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released housing finance data for January 2015 yesterday. This data represents the first full month of lending-based results after APRA’s recommendation to Australian Authorised Deposit-taking Institutes ADI’s reinforcing sound residential mortgage lending benchmarks. Over the month the total value of housing finance commitments fell by -0.6% across both the owner occupier and investor segments of the market. The value of housing finance commitments has increased by 12.8% year-on-year. Taking a look at the breakdown between the owner occupier and investor segment of the market, it is clear that most of the strength is coming from investors. The value of owner occupier housing finance commitments fell by -1.0% over the month and investor lending recorded a fall of -0.1%. Despite the monthly fall in lending, the value of housing finance commitments was 7.1% higher year-on-year to owner occupiers and 22.1% higher to investors. The proportion of total lending to investors reached an all-time high in January 2015. Over the month, 41.4% of the value of all housing finance commitments was to investors. In comparison, a record low 39.1% of the value of housing lending was to owner occupiers for new loan purposes and 19.5% was to owner occupiers for refinances. If we look solely at the value of new lending excluding refinances investor lending hit a record high 51.4% of all new lending in January 2015. Focussing on the owner occupier segment of lending, $17.7 billion was lent in January down from $17.9 billion in December. Across the segment: $1.8 billion was lent for construction of new homes, $0.9 billion for the purchase of new homes, a record high $5.9 billion for refinances and $9.1 billion for purchase of established homes. Month-on-month, housing finance commitments for owner occupiers fell by -2.6% for construction of new homes, -5.4% for the purchase of new homes, +1.8% for refinances and -2.0% for purchases of established dwellings. Year-on-year, the strength in the owner occupier segment has largely been from refinances which have increased by 28.5%. Across the other segments, construction of new homes were up +1.5%, purchase of new homes are -7.2% and purchase of established homes are -0.9%. The data indicates that much of the activity across the owner occupier segment of the market is coming from refinances as home owners shop around for a better deal or prepare to withdraw some of their equity which would feed into the strength of the investment segment. Turning to the investment lending segment, $12.5 billion was lent in January which was slightly lower than investment lending in December. Over the month there was $0.8 billion in commitments for construction of new dwelling and $11.7 billion for commitments to existing homes showing that investor lending is largely going to existing homes with lending to that segment almost 14 times greater than lending for new construction. Over the month, investor commitments for new construction fell -18.8% compared to a 1.6% increase in lending for purchases of existing homes. Year-on-year, the value of commitments for construction of new dwellings is 85.1% higher while investor lending for established homes has increased by 19.1%. The data shows that despite lending to investors is surging, a relatively small amount of this lending is contributing to new housing stock being constructed. Turning to the first home buyer segment of the market, the number of owner occupier first home buyer commitments fell sharply in January. It should be noted that this data series is not seasonally adjusted. Over the month there were 5,961 commitments which was -26.4% lower over the month and -14.4% lower year-on-year. As a proportion of all owner occupier housing finance commitments, investors accounted for 14.2% of commitments in January. Based on this data, the level of first home buyer participation in the market remains extremely low, however a weakness of the ABS data set is that it doesn’t identify first home buyers that are purchasing as investors. Anecdotally, it appears that many first time buyers are choosing to purchase an investment property rather than a principal place of residence. The CoreLogic RP Data Mortgage Index measures activity across CoreLogic RP Data’s mortgage platforms each week. The activity is highly correlated with housing finance data and as the above chart shows, activity has surged over recent weeks. Based on this data, it suggests that despite the Christmas / New Year slowdown there has been no sustained slowdown in mortgage demand. Given this we would expect a rebound in housing finance commitment over the coming months. Following the letter from APRA to Australian ADI’s in December we have seen a slight easing in housing finance commitments however, it is too early to suggest the two are related. Investor activity remains very strong and for the first time on record we have seen six consecutive months in which lending to investors is greater than lending to owner occupiers for new loans. Investors are largely purchasing existing homes which does little to contribute to new housing, although the value of commitments to investors for new construction has risen sharply over the past year. The owner occupier segment is largely being driven by refinance activity as borrowers shop around for better deals on their mortgage and prepare to re-invest some of their equity. Over the coming months it will be important to monitor if the new guidelines from APRA and the ramping up of their surveillance of mortgage lending has much of an effect on demand. We would suspect that the high level of competition in the mortgage market is likely to result in minimal change across the board. While some individual lenders may have to tinker with their lending policies, borrowers have many other banks to choose from if one borrower cannot provide the type of product they are looking for.

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 15 March, 2015

There are 1149 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1085 for the same time last year. Last week’s lower volume produced an outcome in line with trend with the overall auction market continuing to be better than last year. The highest volume of auctions will be held in Reservoir with 22 scheduled. The timing of Easter this year will ensure a very busy three weeks for sellers, buyers and real estate agents. The gap between Labour Day and Easter last year was 5 weeks and there were an average of 1280 auctions a week. This is a similar level of activity to Spring. In respect of the private sale market in the past week, on a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell to 33 days, down from 43 days in the previous week. Overall vendor discounting was up stable at -5.4 per cent. Key data Preliminary clearance rate week ending 8 March: 75% Melbourne auctions expected week ending 15 March: 1149 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 8 March: 33 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 8 March: -5.4% houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.3% higher in the month ending 8 March seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Buying into a tightly held suburb of Melbourne

There are many different ways of looking at the market and making judgements about its performance. You can look at sale prices, days on market or even turn up at auctions and count the number of active bidders. These metrics will invariably tell you how the market is performing, whether is trending up, down, flat and by how much. They don’t and can’t tell you about the future performance. They also don’t tell you about the ease of buying. The fact is that some suburbs are easier to buy into than others because owners are less inclined to sell. That can be for many reasons, sometimes it is cyclical, for instance in the first few years after property is purchased the owners are less likely to sell. We measure the ease of purchasing by comparing the number of homes advertised for sale in a given period with the number of properties in the suburbs. These suburbs are often described as ‘tightly held’. In the year ending 30 November across Melbourne 5.3 per cent of all houses had been advertised for sale. Those houses sold over the same time had been owned for an average of 11.8 years. Drilling down to a suburb level the hardest place to buy a house was in Brunswick East. In Brunswick East a mere 2.1 per cent of houses had been advertised for sale in the past year. Those houses that did sell had been owned for well over the metropolitan average at 14.2 years and in a sign of the lengths buyers were willing to go, the median sale price rose 26.6 per cent in a year. With some exceptions there is a correlation between the period of ownership, the recent capital growth and likelihood to list for sale. At a simple level that is demand and supply in action and it won’t surprise anyone active in the market. It also helps explain why real estate agents often letterbox suburbs or streets looking for an owner to sell! An analysis of the top 10 most difficult places to buy a house shows a high representation of suburbs in the inner north. Carlton is second on the list and it is followed by Fairfield, Carlton North and Fitzroy North. In each case the proportion of houses on the market is below 3 per cent. With the exception of Carlton the increase in median sale price is above the metropolitan wide number for the same time. The inner north of Melbourne has been in strong demand from buyers but the owners have not been as willing to sell. The inner northern suburbs are not the only place this occurs in Melbourne. The top 10 is rounded out by Clayton South, Mulgrave, Watsonia, Hughesdale and Carnegie. With the exception of Watsonia these are also all in a similar part of Melbourne. But what happens if you want to buy into a suburb where the owners don’t want to sell? These are called ‘off market’ transactions and they won’t be covered in this data because the homes are not listed for sale. A small number of those will be the homes sold direct by the owners but the majority are those transacted with the assistance of a buyers agent. Astute buyers agents are able to build their own networks of sellers. This happens because sometimes an owner wants to sell without advertising or they find that because the buyers agent has a good network of buyers there is simply no need to buy the advertising to support the sale. So if you want to buy into a tightly held suburb it pays to approach local real estate agents and let them know you are interested and consider hiring a buyers agent. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Strong demand in Sydney the main feature of weekend

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 8 March 2015 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 73 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 76.4 per cent last week and 70.2 per cent this time last year. The main auction activity this week was in Sydney and that ensured that the national clearance rate remained above 70 per cent for the fourth week in a row. We expect a very busy period between now and Easter with only three weekends available and demand from buyers very strong in Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 83.3 per cent was recorded compared to 81.4 per cent last week and 78.8 per cent last year. This is now the fourth consecutive week with a clearance rate in excess of 80 per cent. This indicates an auction market is strongly tilted in the favour of sellers. In Melbourne the preliminary clearance rate was 73.7 per cent, compared to 77.1 per cent last week and 67.3 per cent this time last year. There was a low volume of auctions in Melbourne due to Labour Day which may account for the small drop in the clearance rate. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 35.5 per cent was recorded compared to 47.9 per cent last week and 45 per cent last year. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 57.1 per cent compared to 76.6 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 68.3 per cent was recorded compared to 74.6 per cent last week. In Perth a clearance rate of 30 per cent was recorded compared to 36.8 per cent last week and 44 per cent last year. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Short drop in auction market volumes after strong fortnight

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 8 March 2015 Strong auction demand continued in Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra last week with all three markets recording clearance rates in excess of their 2014 trend and they were joined by Adelaide where a clearance rate in excess of 70 per cent was recorded for the first time in a year. National volumes also fell this week due to the impact of the Labour Day long weekend, particularly in Melbourne, There are 1,818 auctions expected this week across Australia with 1,448 expected in capital cities. This is compared to 3,238 last week and 1,520 for the same week last year. In Sydney 801 auctions are expected compared to 1,223 last week and 859 this week last year. As volumes reached a record high last year, it is remarkable that they are higher again this year and that demand remains very strong. In Melbourne 312 auctions are expected compared to 1,565 last week and 329 this week last year. Last week saw a record set for the number of homes sold at auction in February. There are 144 auctions expected in Brisbane compared to 216 last week and 138 this week last year. This week there are 62 auctions expected in Adelaide compared to 109 last week and 80 on the same week last year. In Canberra there are 75 auctions expected compared to 84 last week and 64 this week last year. In Perth 42 auctions are expected compared to 27 last week and 33 this week last year. Across Australia the highest volume of auctions in one suburb are 16 in Mosman NSW . Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 8 March, 2015

There are 312 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 329 for the same time last year. Volumes are low due to the Labour Day long weekend. The highest volume of auctions in one suburb is the very popular Glen Waverley where 7 are scheduled. The February Home Value Index results showed the dwelling prices rose at a greater rate over the last three months than any other capital city and rose slightly in the last month. When viewed in conjunction with the strengthening auction market this data confirms the solid position intending sellers now find themselves. This will also encourage a rise in listings over the next few months and provide buyers with good choice in April and May. The clearance rate also rose compared to last year. In February a clearance rate of 74.2 per cent was recorded from 3,452 auctions compared to 71.5 per cent from 2,623 auctions a year ago. In respect of the private sale market in the past week, on a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell to 43 days, down from 60 days in the previous week. Overall vendor discounting was up slightly to -5.5 per cent from -5.4 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 1 March: 77.1% Melbourne auctions expected week ending 8 March: 312 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 1 March: 43 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 1 March: -5.5% houses Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Dwelling approvals reach new record highs in January 2015

Earlier this week, the Australian Bureau of Statistics released building approvals data for January 2015. The data showed that over the month, dwelling approvals surged to an all-time high while the annual number of approvals is also at a record high. Across the nation, the seasonally adjusted data showed that in January 2015, there were 19,282 dwelling approvals. This was a record high number of monthly approvals, 4.9% higher than the previous peak of 18,389 approvals two months earlier. The number of dwelling approvals increased by 7.9% over the month and approvals are 9.1% higher year-on-year. On an annualised basis, we are also seeing a record high with 203,182 approvals, up 0.8% over the month and 10.8% year-on-year. This represents a strong pipeline of new dwellings to be constructed. Looking more closely at the national figures, it shows that the surge in approvals over the month was entirely due to unit approvals as opposed to house approvals. We also saw a rare occurrence whereby there were more units approved for construction than houses. The above chart highlights monthly approvals with the thicker lines showing the 6 month average number of approvals. Over the month there were 9,588 house approvals and 9,694 unit approvals. The monthly number of house approvals has been fairly flat for the past 11 months while unit approvals tend to be much more volatile but trending higher. In January 2015, house approvals fell -0.4% while unit approvals increased by 17.5%. Year-on-year to January 2015, house approvals have fallen by -2.9% while unit approvals were 24.3% higher. Turning the focus to the capital cities it is firstly important to note that unlike the national data the figures are not seasonally adjusted. In January 2014 there were 11,926 capital city dwelling approvals which was -14.1% lower over the month but 8.6% higher year-on-year. Over the past 12 months, there has been a record high 153,323 dwelling approvals across the combined capital cities. Once again looking at houses as opposed to units, the data shows that the unit market is the key driver of new housing approvals. In January 2015 there were 4,986 capital city house approvals and 6,940 unit approvals. Approvals for both houses -11.2% and units -16.0% were lower over the month which can largely be attributed to seasonal effect of a weaker January. The unit series tends to be more volatile however, house approvals were at their lowest level since December 2013 over the month. The chart also shows that unit approvals have generally been outnumbering house approvals since the middle of 2012 despite some volatility month-to-month . Year-on-year, capital city house approvals are -5.9% lower while unit approvals are 22.1% higher. Looking at the individual capital cities and utilising annual data to smooth out some of the volatility, it is clear that there has been a surge in approvals over the past few years across the major regions of Australia. First looking at house approvals, over the 12 months to January there were 13,337 approvals in Sydney, 22,198 in Melbourne, 10,574 in Brisbane, 5,879 in Adelaide, 20,001 in Perth, 886 in Hobart, 789 in Darwin and 1,621 in Canberra. Year-on-year, the number of house approvals have changed by 18.1% in Sydney, 16.2% in Melbourne, 34.2% in Brisbane, 8.2% in Adelaide, 12.1% in Perth, 59.1% in Hobart, 7.5% in Darwin and -1.0% in Canberra. Probably the most interesting point to note from the data is that both Melbourne and Perth approved more houses than Sydney, despite Sydney’s larger overall population. Turning the focus to the unit market, over the past year the number approvals across the cities have been recorded at: 25,440 in Sydney, 26,712 in Melbourne, 12,012 in Brisbane, 3,241 in Adelaide, 7,432 in Perth, 95 in Hobart, 1,016 in Darwin and 2,090 in Canberra. Only Adelaide, Perth and Hobart have approved more houses than units over the year. The annual change in unit approvals across the cities are recorded at: 0.7% in Sydney, 22.8% in Melbourne, 7.6% in Brisbane, 17.8% in Adelaide, 38.0% in Perth, -48.4% in Hobart, -15.4% in Darwin and -38.9% in Canberra. The supply-side response has generally been quite positive over recent years however, in Sydney, where the dwelling deficiency is greatest, has experienced a much smaller increase in new supply than across other cities. The Perth, Darwin and Canberra housing markets have weakened noticeably over the past year with value growth slowing and rental rates falling. New dwelling approvals have eased in Darwin and Canberra however, Perth continues to approve a increasingly larger number of dwellings for construction despite the softening housing market conditions in this city. Approvals have surged by a greater amount for units as opposed to houses over the past several years. If we look at how this is now playing out we find some interesting trends: • Investors tend to target unit stock rather than detached houses in particular units in the inner city and this is where a large amount of unit stock already exists and a high proportion of the new stock is being delivered. • In Melbourne and Brisbane, where the rise in prominence of unit approvals has been greatest over recent years, unit values have recorded an annual increase of 2.8% and 0.5% compared to 8.0% and 6.5% for houses. • Turning to the rental markets, capital city house rents have increased by 1.6% over the past year which is lower than the 2.3% increase in unit rents however, in Melbourne and Brisbane annual growth in rents has been lower for units than houses. • The annual rental growth figures for units are 2.2% in Melbourne and 0.5% in Brisbane compared to 2.5% and 2.0% respectively for houses. Keeping in mind that many of these recent unit approvals will take time to be built, it could be the case that value and rental growth for Melbourne and Brisbane units will be minimal due to the higher supply levels coming on line. This may also have an impact for the wider market as the overall composition of unit stock increases it may result in lower overall value growth. Other cities should be cautious of higher housing stock levels, particularly within the inner city apartment markets. With population growth slowing, particularly from overseas, and a surge in new construction, without careful management an under-supply of dwellings can quite quickly turn to a glut in particular areas if too many new homes are approved. Brisbane at least appears to have slowed its rate of approvals growth recently however, it is potentially concerning that Melbourne has seen no such easing of the throttle. More dwellings are required nationally however, developers and those approving these new homes need to carefully monitor just how many new homes are required at one point in time. The RBA has pointed out that they want to extend this period of increased construction for as long as possible. Extending this heightened period of construction will help support jobs, particularly as high rise construction takes much longer than house construction, and will help reduce the housing deficiency. But we must be cautious to ensure that we aren’t just creating oversupplies in inner city areas while maintaining deficiencies in other areas of our cities where cheap and affordable housing options are required.

Melbourne residential market provides highest growth over quarter

The February CoreLogic RP Data Home Value Index results read results here showed the dwelling prices rose at a greater rate over the last three months than any other capital city. When viewed in conjunction with the strengthening auction market this data confirms the solid position intending sellers now find themselves in. This will also encourage a rise in listings over the next few months and provide buyers with good choice in April and May. In the last three months house values have risen 4.8 per cent and over the last month the rise was a more moderate 0.2 per cent. Based on settled sales in the last quarter the median sale price was $549,000. In the last three months unit values have risen 1.8 per cent and over the last month the rise 0.5 per cent. Based on settled sales in the last quarter the median sale price was $450,000. Unit values continue to be subdued due to high supply. The clearance rate also rose compared to last year. In February a clearance rate of 74.1 per cent was recorded from 3,452 auctions compared to 71.5 per cent from 2,623 auctions a year ago. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Capital city auction market showing best results in 5 years

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 1 March 2015 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 77.1 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 77.3 per cent last week and 74.2 per cent this time last year. Following last weeks strong result this week’s result indicates the auction market is delivering healthy outcomes to sellers in increasing numbers. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 82.8 per cent was recorded compared to 86.2 per cent last week and 77.6 per cent last year. This is the fourth consecutive week in excess of 80 per cent making it the strongest capital city auction market in recent times. The Sydney auction market is in uncharted territory now. In Melbourne the preliminary clearance rate was 76.5 per cent, compared to 75.8 per cent last week and 76.6 per cent this time last year. The Melbourne auction market is beginning to record numbers similar to autumn 2010, when high clearance rates and volumes translated into strong capital gains. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 54.6 per cent was recorded compared to 63.6 per cent last week and 46.2 per cent last year. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 78.6 per cent compared to 53.3 per cent last week. In Canberra the market is beginning to show levels of demand currently present in Sydney and Melbourne. A clearance rate of 81.6 per cent was recorded compared to 72.4 per cent last week. In Perth a clearance rate of 40 per cent was recorded compared to 46.4 per cent last week and 55 per cent last year. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Residential property listings – February update

CoreLogic RP Data’s latest listings counts show that while overall listing stock is picking up on a monthly basis, listing volumes remain low when compared to the same time last year, although conditions are different across the individual states and capital cities. Over the four weeks ending 22 February 2015 there were 45,681 new listings added to the market nationally, bringing the total listings stock up to 241,994. Meanwhile, across the capital city markets, 28,447 new listings were added to the market over the four week period giving buyers access to a total of 98,811 residential properties that were listed for sale across the combined capital cities over the four week period. Nationally, total listing numbers are -2.5 per cent lower than at the same time last year and -4.1 per cent lower across the capital city markets, however this is not reflected across all individual markets. At a capital city level, total listings are 10.4% higher than at the same time last year in Perth, while across the smaller markets of Darwin +31.6% and Canberra 11.4% , total stock levels are currently higher than they were at the same time last year. Interestingly, while new listing being added to the market are also higher than at the same time last year in Perth and Darwin, the same cannot be said for Canberra, indicating the high level of stock is more likely attributed to a lower turnover. On a state-by-state basis, listings activity is relatively similar, with WA, NT and the ACT all recording a higher level of stock currently when compared to the same time last year, while the opposite can be said for all of the other states and territories. The latest figures from the CoreLogic RP Data Listing Index shows a 3.6% monthly increase in the number of properties being prepared for sale across the CoreLogic RP Data platforms when adjusted for seasonality. Tasmania is the only state to record a decrease across the Listing Index -0.2% over the month while all other states have seen listing activity increase over the month. In absolute terms, it is unsurprising that the preparation of homes for sale nationally has increased over the month +36.4% , given the seasonal slow-down experienced each year over the December/January period. We would anticipate that this will translate into a further surge in new listing activity over the next couple of weeks.

Good conditions for sellers after highest clearance rate since 2009

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 1 March 2015 The national auction market demonstrated exceedingly strong demand last week with the highest clearance rate recorded since September 2009. This is evident in all capital cities along the eastern seaboard along with Canberra. There are 3,347 auctions expected this week across Australia with 2,831 expected in capital cities. This is compared 2,372 last week and 2,712 for the same week last year. In Sydney 1,028 auctions are expected compared to 921 last week and 1,035 this week last year. If last week’s result, a clearance higher than any in the past 5 years, is repeated over the next few weeks it will have a direct impact on prices across the market. Clearance rates persistently in the 80’s indicate a market strongly favouring sellers and this generally results in unsustainable price rises. In Melbourne 1,401 auctions are expected compared to 1,074 last week and 1,334 this week last year. Demand continues to rise in line with supply and buyers will see good choice with high volumes in many of the leafy green inner eastern and popular seaside suburbs. There are 187 auctions expected in Brisbane compared to 119 last week and 149 this week last year. The substantial increase in the clearance rate last week mirrors market conditions at the same time last year. This week there are 103 auctions expected in Adelaide compared to 125 last week and 97 on the same week last year. In Canberra there are 73 auctions expected compared to 86 last week and 68 this week last year. In Perth 23 auctions are expected compared to 32 last week and 22 this week last year. Across Australia the highest volume of auctions in one suburb are 24 in Reservoir Vic . Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 1 March, 2015

There are 1,401 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,334 for the same time last year. This is the second week with over 1,000 auctions for the year and volumes at auctions have risen to a level that is similar to last year now. Once listings for private sale are taken into consideration there are fewer new homes on the market than a year ago. There were 1.8 per cent fewer homes listed for sale in the past month than last year which suggests consumers are still approaching the market is caution. In respect of the private sale market in the past week, on a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell to 60 days, down from 66 days in the previous week. Overall vendor discounting was up slightly to -5.4 per cent from -5.1 per cent. Key data Preliminary clearance rate week ending 22 February: 75.8 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 1 March: 1,401 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 22 February: 60 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 22 February: -5.4 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.7 per cent higher in the month ending 22 February seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 1 March, 2015

There are 1,401 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,334 for the same time last year. This is the second week with over 1,000 auctions for the year and volumes at auctions have risen to a level that is similar to last year now. Once listings for private sale are taken into consideration there are fewer new homes on the market than a year ago. There were 1.8 per cent fewer homes listed for sale in the past month than last year which suggests consumers are still approaching the market is caution. In respect of the private sale market in the past week, on a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell to 60 days, down from 66 days in the previous week. Overall vendor discounting was up slightly to -5.4 per cent from -5.1 per cent. Key data Preliminary clearance rate week ending 22 February: 75.8 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 1 March: 1,401 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 22 February: 60 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 22 February: -5.4 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.7 per cent higher in the month ending 22 February seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Interest-only and investor lending continued to increase up to the end of 2014 according to APRA

The Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA released data earlier today on residential property exposures by Australian Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions ADIs . The data was published up to the end of December 2014. The information provides additional insight into the nature of mortgage lending by Australian banks, building societies and credit unions. According to APRA’s data, at the end of 2014, there were $1.278 trillion in residential term loans with $839.8 billion in owner occupied loans 65.7% and $438.9 billion in investor loans 34.3% . Over the 12 months to December 2014, the value of residential term loans to owner occupiers increased by 7.4% compared to a 12.2% rise in loans to investors. Note that in December APRA raised concerns about annual growth in investor loan books above 10%. Based on this data many ADIs would be growing that segment of their book above that benchmark. Focusing on the characteristics of these loans shows a growing appetite for loans with an offset facility and interest-only loans. Meanwhile, the prominence of low documentation loans and other non-standard loans is reducing. Based on the value of lending, loans with an offset facility increased by 18.4% year-on-year to December 2014, interest-only loans were 15.1% higher, reverse mortgages had increased 1.9% while low documentation loans and other non-standard loans had reduced by -18.6% and -20.2% respectively. At the end of 2014, a record high 37.5% of outstanding loans had an offset facility and a record high 36.9% were interest-only. Just 0.2% of loans were reverse mortgages, a record low 2.5% were low documentation and just 0.1% were other non-standard loans. At the end of December 2014, the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS estimated that there were 9,448,300 households while APRA reported that there were 5,213,000 mortgages to Australian ADIs. This indicates that 55.2% of Australia’s housing stock was mortgaged to Australian ADIs. The 55.2% figure is the highest on record, noting that records have only been calculated from the September quarter of 2011. The ABS also reports the value of residential housing stock at $5.4 trillion and given the $1.258 trillion in outstanding mortgages to Australian ADIs, 23.3% of the value of all housing stock is mortgaged. The average value of the outstanding mortgages, according to APRA’s data, was $241,400 at the end of 2014, with the average loan size having increased by 3.4% over the past year. Loans with offset facilities $285,900 and interest-only mortgages $311,300 had much higher average loan sizes which have increased by 2.1% and 2.8% over the past year. Reverse mortgages had an average size of $93,100 having increased by 3.8% over the year. Low documentation loans had an average outstanding amount of $204,800 and other non-standard loans had an average of $211,900, outstanding loan sizes have fallen over the year -2.9% and -7.1% respectively. Over the December 2014 quarter, there were 93,231 new loans written by Australian ADIs. Of these loans, 23,183 24.9% had a loan-to-value ratio LVR of less than 60%, 38,964 41.8% had an LVR of between 60% and 80%, 20,464 21.9% had an LVR of 80% to 90% and the remaining 10,620 11.4% had an LVR of more than 90%. Year-on-year, the number of loans with an LVR of more than 90% have fallen by 6.9%. Over the same period, loans with an LVR of less than 60% have increased by 10.8%, loans with an LVR of 60% to 80% have increased by 13.1% and loans with an LVR between 80% and 90% have increased by 17.7%. Given APRA had concerns of the rate of growth in the investment segment of the market, this latest data is likely cause APRA some discomfort. Not only is this data showing the investment segment growing at a rate much higher than 10% annually, but also interest-only lending which tends to be reflective of investment lending is also increasing substantially. On a more positive note, although investment lending is increasing it is encouraging to see the drop in higher LVR lending above 90% which suggests that ADIs are being somewhat more cautious around higher risk lending especially considering the overall number of loans being written has continued to grow. We can expect the regulator will be monitoring lending standards with more focus after the release of this data, particularly from the perspective of investment lending and interest only mortages.

Where are most of Melbourneâ

Key points Over the past 5 years the number of million dollar homes sold has almost tripled; Glen Waverley and Mount Waverley are in the top 10 and were not 5 years ago; Nearly 10,000 homes have sold in the last year for more than $1m. Five years ago there were 3,335 homes sold for in excess of one million dollars in Melbourne – not so surprising is that the top 10 sales were in the city’s most expensive addresses. The top three, Brighton, Camberwell and Kew, saw 266, 162 and 157 houses sold for over a million dollars in 12 months. Remarkably, in the bayside suburb of Brighton, 109 of those were in excess of 2 million dollars. Bay views command incredible sale prices due to their scarcity. The remaining seven in the list are Toorak, Brighton East, Hawthorn, Malvern, Malvern East, Canterbury and Surry Hills. Over the past year, the million-dollar list has changed and shows some interesting shifts in the market. Firstly, there are many more with 9,684 sales over a million. Secondly five of the top 10 are new. Balwyn North, Glen Waverley, Glen Iris, Balwyn and Mount Waverley are newly into the list. Balwyn and Balwyn North are not a surprise, along with neighbouring Mont Albert and Mont Albert North, they have seen the highest capital gains on an annualised basis over the past 5 years in Melbourne. The most significant shift is found in Mount Waverley and Glen Waverley. Between these, 442 houses sold for over a million dollars, 41 of those for over two million. Both have seen increases in demand well in excess of the comparable suburbs to the north and south with buyers attracted by a range of factors from transport choices to schools. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

National clearance rate of 77.7% recorded over the weekend

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 22 February 2015 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 77.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 74 per cent last week and 76.2 per cent this time last year. At this stage this is the highest clearance rate recorded on a national level since September 2009. Last week’s momentum has been carried into this week with solid demand evident in Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra. The interest rate cut is clearly having a beneficial impact. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 87.8 per cent was recorded and this is higher than any other week in the past year. This is compared to 83.3 per cent last week and 84.2 per cent last year. This result is the sign of a strong market but not against the trend at this time last year. In Melbourne preliminary clearance rate was 74.9 per cent, compared to 70.9 per cent last week and 73.5 per cent this time last year. The Melbourne auction market has lifted by around 15 points in the past two weeks. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 68.9 per cent was recorded compared to 49.5 per cent last week. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 55.2 per cent compared to 69 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 72.9 per cent was recorded compared to 72.3 per cent last week. This is the third week with a clearance rate in excess of 70 per cent and means the Canberra auction market has had a stronger start than last year. In Perth a clearance rate of 53.8 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 22 February, 2015

There are 936 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,401 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions will be in Richmond with 20 scheduled. There are 17 in Bentleigh East and St Kilda. The Melbourne auction market is sending mixed messages at the moment, on one hand the clearance rate has risen to be closer to the trend rate for last year, when it was 68.2%. In contrast volumes are low suggesting that potential vendors are lacking the confidence shown last year. It is also possible that vendors and their real estate agents are choosing private sale instead of auction as a method of sale. It won’t however be possible to ascertain if that is happening for a few months. In respect of the private sale market in the past week, on a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was 66 days, slightly up from 65 days in the previous week. Overall vendor discounting was up slightly to -5.2% from -5.1%. Key data Clearance rate week ending 15 February: 70.9% Melbourne auctions expected week ending 22 February: 936 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 15 February: 65 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 15 February: -5.2% houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.5% lower in the month ending 15 February seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Volumes continue to be low but clearance rate rises

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 22 February 2015 The trend of lower auction volumes in 2015 continues with 29 per cent fewer homes on offer across capital cities this week. The low volumes appear to have contributed to strong rises in the clearance rate last week in both Sydney and Melbourne. There are 2,497 auctions expected this week across Australia with 2,058 expected in capital cities. This is compared 1,541 last week and 2,905 for the same week last year. In Sydney 775 auctions are expected compared to 662 last week and 1,101 this week last year. The clearance rate last week was the highest in a year and should encourage a few more vendors to list for sale as there is clearly strong demand from buyers. In Melbourne 936 auctions are expected compared to 584 last week and 1,401 this week last year. The 10-point rise in the clearance rate last week is a sign of a healthy market and provides an indication that the interest rate cut has been welcomed by buyers. There are 101 auctions expected in Brisbane compared to 118 last week and 161 this week last year. This week there are 124 auctions expected in Adelaide compared to 91 last week and 118 on the same week last year. In Canberra there are 77 auctions expected compared to 49 last week and 65 this week last year. In Perth 30 auctions are expected compared to 26 last week and 49 this week last year. Across Australia the highest volume of auctions in one suburb are 20 in Richmond Vic . Of the 2,497 homes being auctioned 936 are listed as 3 bedrooms, 666 as 5 bedrooms and only 162 with 5 bedrooms. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

US real estate agents are harnessing social media and new technology to win customers

In late January I attended the Inman Real Estate Connect Conference in New York. The conference is targeted at real estate professionals and provides insight into the latest news and trends within the market. In this week’s blog I will share some of the new technology, websites and applications as well as some of the ways US agents are now using social media to communicate with clients. Most of the websites and applications are US-centric but here I will highlight those which are also relevant to the Australian market. Social Media In the US, social media is big for real estate agents and brokers. Although LinkedIn, Facebook, Youtube and Twitter may immediately spring to mind, real estate professionals are now starting to effectively create leads from Instagram and Pintrest. In fact, in the US, agents receive more referral traffic from Pintrest than they do from Google Plus, Linkedin and Youtube combined. Real estate professionals are effectively using Pintrest by creating pinboards of design ideas and solutions that they like and local area information. This can include but is not limited to: Smart home design Storage solutions Room designs Local area landmarks shops, cafes, bars etc Local restaurants Furthermore, US agents are pinning the listings information of homes they have, and have had, available for sale so they can show customers on their inspections. Instagram is being used in a similar way whereby agents create a unique hashtags e.g. #ckusherlistings and upload photos of all their current and previous listings to have these immediately searchable to show clients. Websites Buzzsumo buzzsumo.com Buzzsumo is a website that that allows you to analyse how well your social media content is being used. It shows the total number of shares of your content and then breaks it down by the different social media platforms. Social media in real estate certainly isn’t as big in Australia as it is in the US, but this is a good website that allows you to see where both you and your competitors are getting the eyeballs and ultimately the shares. Fancyhands fancyhands.com Fancyhands is a US based business which offers a virtual personal assistance service. As per the website they can do all those tasks that you don’t have the time nor the desire to do, this may include: Managing your appointment schedule Organising travel Administrative tasks such as data entry Reservations Booking travel Floored floored.com Floored create 3D videos of properties so potential buyers can walk through a property before they physically see the property. The models are optimised so you can watch them through an internet browser of through a mobile phone or tablet. The technology can also be used to create 3D real estate models for homes which aren’t even built as yet. You can also include furniture to get an even clearer idea of how things will fit in the space. Oculus oculus.com Oculus is a virtual reality headset which is being backed by Facebook. For the real estate industry it can be utilised by allowing customers to literally walk through the home without having to physically do open-for-inspection. Homekeepr homekeepr.com Homekeepr is a home maintenance app that can be used by both real estate professionals and anyone that owns a home. The app asks 10 questions about the characteristics of your home, it then creates a list of maintenance tasks that are required for the home and sets reminders as to when you should do these tasks. The application provides a description of what the task is and why it should be done. It then recommends local service providers to undertake these tasks. The agent’s app offers customers the opportunity to download the app and it is customised to the clients’ home s . The list of local service providers for each task can be customised by the agent. When the task is due to be completed they receive both a notification on the app and an email from you as their agent reminding them that the task needs to be completed. The agent can even put their own recommendations outside of those specifically for the home such as local restaurants, shops, schools and much more.

National clearance rate of 70% recorded for the weekend

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 15 February 2015 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 70 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 67.3 per cent last week and 70.2 per cent this time last year. The market performed to recent trend this week and results between now and the Labour Day long weekend should provide a clearer indication as to the state of the auction market this year. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 77.9 per cent recorded compared to 80.6 per cent last week and 80.2 per cent last year. The Sydney auction market has not shown any sign of weakness following the stand out year in 2014. In Melbourne the auction market improved following the lowest clearance rate in 26 months last week. The preliminary clearance rate was 67.4 per cent, compared to 60.7 per cent last week and 69.2 per cent this time last year. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 50.6 per cent was recorded compared to 47.6 per cent last week. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 72 per cent compared to 58.2 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 72.2 per cent was recorded compared to 67.9 per cent last week. In Perth a clearance rate of 33.3 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne’s Top 10 suburbs by Vendor Discounting

Key points Vendor discount is great metric for buyers and sellers Springvale was the most highly discounted suburb in 2014* Million dollar suburbs dominated the highest discounts in 2009* One of the more interesting property market metrics tracked by CoreLogic RP Data is the average vendor discount. It shows the difference between the advertised price and sale price. It only applies to homes sold through private sale and those that had an advertised price. If the vendor discount is very high it shows that either demand is soft in an area, the vendors expectations are too high, or a combination of both. For a house in the Melbourne metropolitan area the average vendor discount in the most recent 12 months was -5.6 per cent. This does contrast to auctions where the sale price tends to be above advertised price. This can therefore be very useful information for buyers as it can help them make a judgement about how much to offer. Likewise for sellers it can help them set a realistic sale price. In the twelve months ending 30 November the most recent and comprehensive data the top 10 suburbs when ranked by the size of the vendor discount were mostly south of the Yarra and around the metropolitan median. Top of the list was Springvale where the vendors had to discount their desired sale price by 15.3 per cent. Other suburbs in the outer east where vendors’ house price expectations were overpriced for the market conditions were Wantirna, Ringwood East, Springvale South, Bayswater and Bayswater North. Five years ago the most remarkable difference was the prevalence of million dollar suburbs. Half the list had a median house value in excess of a million dollars which reflects the soft market conditions at the time. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist *The above analysis is based on detached houses over the twelve months ending 30 November

National auction market trailing 2014

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 15 February 2015 Auction volumes are currently tracking lower than they were this time last year with around 8 per cent fewer across capital cities. Despite being early in the year, this is most pronounced in Melbourne which has had 27 per cent fewer auctions. In contrast volumes are 25 per cent higher in Adelaide and stable in Sydney. As the entire number of auctions so far this year is similar to a large week in spring, this trend may still be easily reversed. Across Australia, there are 1,713 auctions expected this week with 1,289 expected in capital cities. This is compared 987 last week and 1,667 for the same week last year. In Sydney, 509 auctions are expected compared to 255 last week and 614 this week last year. In Melbourne 506 auctions are expected compared to 255 last week, and 783 this week last year. Many prospective vendors appear to be holding back which is contributing to a lower clearance rate. Last week was the lowest recorded for 26 months. There are 103 auctions expected in Brisbane compared to 109 last week and 133 this week last year. In Adelaide the auction market has had a very healthy start to the year so far. This week there are 88 auctions expected compared to 94 last week and 58 on the same week last year. In Canberra there are 51 auctions expected compared to 69 last week and 41 this week last year. In Perth 23 auctions are expected compared to 31 last week and 26 this week last year. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 15 February 2015

There are 506 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 783 for the same time last year. Auction volumes continue to be well below those recorded twelve months ago and last week saw the lowest clearance rate for 26 months. Recent analysis from CoreLogic RP Data & the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS shows that, once inflation is accounted for, Melbourne home values were not quite yet at a new peak. The results showed that home values were 2.7 per cent below the peak in September 2010; when the improvement in January is included home values will be very close to peak in real terms. It’s also illustrative to compare the strength of the market in this cycle to the last in 2010. Values rose at just half the rate of pace in 2010 which has helped to underscore the more moderate market conditions and consumer conservatism. The private sale market has also begun. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was 65 days over the last week and vendor discounting was -5.1 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 8 February: 60.7% Melbourne auctions expected week ending 15 February: 506 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 8 February: 65 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 8 February: -5.1% houses Listings being prepared for market are 9 per cent lower in month ending 8 February seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Investors surge after APRA warns about investor housing lending in December 2014

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released housing finance data for December 2014 earlier today. The data showed an end of year surge both in the value and the number of loans. The surge coincided with the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA warning Australian Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions ADIs about risky mortgage lending practices during the month. Over the month, the value of housing finance commitments increased by a total of 4.7%, the largest monthly increase since September 2013. The large increase was comprised of a 4.1% increase in owner occupier refinanced loans, a 3.6% increase in owner occupier new loans and a 6.0% increase in investor loans. The surge in investor loans is noteworthy, but so too is the jump in owner occupier new loans which had been flat for the past 12 months. Year-on-year, owner occupier refinances have increased by 27.0%, owner occupier new loans have increased by 4.9% and investor loans have climbed 18.8% higher. In December 2014, there were $5.8 billion in housing finance commitments for owner occupier refinances, $12.3 billion for owner occupier new loans and $12.6 billion for investor loans. Both refinances and investor loan commitments were at a record high. Based on this data, the proportion of owner occupier new loans accounted for an all-time low 40.1% of housing finance commitments compared to 18.9% of all commitments for owner occupier refinances and a near record high 41.0% of commitments to investors. If we strip out refinances, investors accounted for a record high 50.6% of new housing finance commitments in December 2014. Looking specifically at the owner occupier segment of the market, there was $1.9 billion in commitments for construction of dwellings, $1.0 billion in commitments for the purchase of new dwellings, $5.8 billion in refinancing of established dwellings and $9.4 billion in commitments for established dwellings. There has been a surge in finance demand over the year, particularly for newly constructed dwellings and refinances. Year-on-year, the change in owner occupier housing finance commitments has been recorded at: 14.6% for the construction of new dwellings, 1.8% for the purchase of new dwellings, 27.0% for refinances and an increase of 3.5% for purchase of established homes. Focusing on the investment segment, in December 2014 there was $1.0 billion lent for the purposes of both construction of new and $11.5 billion borrowed for investment in established homes. The year-on-year changes have been recorded at 59.8% for new construction and 16.1% for established homes. The other important figure released by the ABS is the owner occupier first home buyer commitments. The ABS has recognized that these figures have been under-reported and have revised these figures this month. Note that these figures still only include first home buyers that are purchasing homes for owner occupation. In December 2014 there were 8,213 owner occupier housing finance commitments to first home buyers, representing 14.5% of all owner occupier commitments. Despite the revisions, the number of commitments is -1.3% lower over the year. Furthermore, the 14.5% represents the lowest proportion of commitments to first home buyers since June 2004. The data indicates first home buyers continue to languish whilst those that already own homes and are upgrading, refinancing or purchasing an investment property continue to dominate the market. What is less clear is how many first time buyers are doing so for investment purposes the ABS doesn’t provide a further breakdown of investment loans by buyer type as they do for owner occupiers . As noted earlier, APRA wrote to Australian ADIs in December reiterating what they determine are prudent measures for lending and potential repercussions for those that don’t follow these guidelines. Given the results you would have to say it had little effect on borrowers or lenders in December. It’s also worth noting that along with an 18.8% year-on-year increase in the value of investor commitments over 2014, the RBA’s housing credit data showed that total investor credit expanded by 10.1% in 2014. APRA noted concerns with lenders growing the investment segment of their loan book above 10% annually. Based on these results you would have to say there remain some concerns for the regulator and it will be interesting to see if or what their next move is. What’s not in doubt is that the ball is now firmly in APRA’s court and we are closely watching what happens next.

National clearance rate of 66.9% on second auction week of 2015

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 8 February 2015 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 66.9 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 61.6 per cent last week and 68.2 per cent this time last year. This weeks result compares well to the 2014 market when an overall clearance rate of 67.8 per cent was recorded. It also broadly reflects the moderate growth recorded in home values this year. The positive impact of the rate cut will take a few weeks to be apparent on a national wide scale as volumes are still low. If the rate cut is to encourage a few more active buyers and sellers it will also take a few weeks to be obvious. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 80.5 per cent recorded compared to 77.9 per cent last week and 79.5 per cent last year. Compared to last year this is near identical start. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 61.4 per cent was recorded compared to 66.3 per cent last week and 67.5 per cent this time last year. It is still early but results so far make it interesting to see which way the market goes as the year has started with lower auction volumes and clearance rates. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 45.6 per cent was recorded compared to 43.3 per cent last week. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 61.1 per cent compared to 52.7 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 62.8 per cent was recorded compared to 72.7 per cent last week, whilst for Perth a clearance rate of 35.7 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Auction buyers to benefit from interest rate cuts

This week’s interest rate cut will provide a boost to the auction market over the coming month and deliver a welcome reprieve for buyers looking to reduce costs. Not only will buyers enjoy the increased purchasing power, sellers will welcome the unexpected boost to the market in the middle of their marketing campaigns. This week, there are 1,218 auctions expected across Australia, with 824 of these scheduled for in capital cities. This is compared to 502 last week and 927 for the same week last year. The primary reason for lower auction volumes in capital cities is due to 36 per cent fewer auctions in Melbourne. In Sydney 317 auctions are expected compared to 154 last week and 362 this week last year. In Melbourne 214 auctions are expected compared to 102 last week and 335 this week last year. The main activity this week in Melbourne will be found in the eastern suburbs with 9 auctions in Mount Waverley and 8 in Glen Waverly. In Portarlington, near Geelong, there are also 9 auctions expected. There are 99 auctions expected in Brisbane compared to 85 last week and 98 this week last year. This highest level of activity will be found outside Brisbane with 180 auctions scheduled across the rest of Queensland. For example, the most auctions in any one suburb in Queensland will be in Surfers Paradise where 9 are expected. In Adelaide there are 86 auctions expected. This is slightly lower than the 102 last week but higher than the 70 on the same week last year. In Canberra the volume of auctions is higher than last week and this time last year when there was 50. There are 69 expected this week. In Perth 30 auctions are expected compared to 24 last week and 43 this week last year. The highest volume of auctions will be in Port Macquarie NSW where 10 are expected. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Some words of caution on housing supply

In a blog post produced a few weeks ago HERE , we highlighted that the number of dwellings approved for construction reached an all-time high over the year to November 2014 with almost 200,000 approvals registered nationally. Over the year house approvals were up 3.6% compared with an 18% increase in the number of multi-unit dwellings approved. The record level of housing supply in the pipeline comes at a time when population growth ie housing demand is winding down and some of the heat is coming out of the housing market. A deep dive on the Australian Bureau of Statistics approvals data pinpoints exactly where the bulk of the development pipeline from the past year is geographically concentrated. At a broad level we can see the majority of new dwelling approvals are located in Melbourne where 44,633 new dwellings have been approved for construction over the 12 months ending November 2014. Melbourne dwelling approvals accounted for 23% of all approvals nationally and 31% of all approvals across the combined capital city metro areas. Sydney was close behind, recording just over 39,000 new dwelling approvals over the year. 67% of all approvals across the Sydney market were for multi-unit dwellings the highest proportion of apartments approved of any capital city . While new housing supply should generally be viewed as positive and a necessary factor in the Australian housing market and economy, areas where the approved supply pipeline are out of alignment with demand can offer up an element of risk. We recommend that prospective buyers factor supply levels into their housing market analysis and undertake additional research where they fear an area may be in oversupply or at least moving in this direction. The number of multi-unit dwellings, particularly in Melbourne and Brisbane are hovering around record highs. Of course demand for this type of product is increasing but there are risks associated with too much new development of this product type, particularly given values are rising and population growth is slowing. Eight of the top 20 SA3 regions, based on the number of dwelling approvals over the year to November 2014, are located in Melbourne; five are located in Perth, four in Sydney, two in Brisbane and one in Canberra. The tables and maps below highlight exactly where the largest amount of new housing supply is in the pipeline. Seven of the top ten SA3 regions showing the most dwelling approvals across Sydney have a strong bias towards multi-unit dwellings, with the Inner Sydney region topping the list at 2,631 new apartments approved over the twelve months to November 2014. Within the inner city region it is the Waterloo-Beaconsfield area that is attracting the most developer interest. These suburbs account for 1,047 or 41% of the apartments being developed across the Inner Sydney SA3 region. Several areas around Sydney’s inner ring are attracting very little in the way of densification over the past year. The Manly region has only recorded 48 new dwelling approvals over the past year and similarly, Leichardt has recorded only 65 new dwelling approvals. Towards the outskirts of the city, the regions attracting the largest supply pipeline are Parramatta 1,558 new unit approvals over the past year and 119 house approvals as well as the Bringelly-Green Valley region which is seeing an influx of new detached housing approvals 1,449 . Melbourne’s inner city tops the nation with the majority of new dwelling approvals, recording just over 5,000 new apartment approvals over the past year. The high approval reading comes after 3,725 apartments were approved in the same region over the previous year as well as 5,419 the year before that. More than half of last year’s approvals across the Melbourne Inner City were located in the Melbourne CBD 2,418 followed by North Melbourne 682 and Docklands 657 . Outside of the inner city, the majority of new dwelling approvals across the Melbourne metro area have been located in the outer fringes and are primarily detached dwellings. The Whittlesea-Wallan region has recorded the second highest number of Greater Melbourne dwelling approvals over the twelve month period at 2,956 of which 83% were detached dwellings. The data shows that the densification taking place in the Melbourne housing market is very much focussed within the inner city core. The Brisbane Inner North SA3 region has recorded the third highest number of new dwelling approvals of all SA3 regions nationally over the 12 months to November 2014. 2,981 new apartment approvals were recorded over the year and 117 house approvals. The suburbs of Bowen Hills and Newstead comprise the majority of these approvals with 1,535 new apartments approved for construction over the twelve month period. The Inner City region also recorded a high number of multi-unit dwelling approvals, with 1,881 new apartments approved for construction over the year. Outside of the state capital, the regional city of Townsville recorded the third highest number of dwelling approvals across the state over the twelve month period, with 1,228 houses and 410 apartments. Interestingly, the resource-intensive regions of Mackay and Gladstone-Biloela, where market conditions have softened substantially, have also made it into the top ten for the state for new dwelling approvals over the year. Slightly less than one third 31.3% of all new dwelling approvals across Adelaide were for multi-unit dwellings over the twelve months ending November 2014, with the city having a clear preference for detached dwellings. The largest supply pipeline, based on approvals over the twelve month period, can be found in Onkaparinga where 1,103 new dwelling approvals were issued over the year. Most of the approvals were at Seaford 418 , Aldinga 164 and Christies Beach 132 . The Charles Sturt region was the only other SA3 in South Australia to record more than 1,000 approvals over the year. At a time when the Perth housing market is slowing down, new dwelling approvals have moved to historic highs. The SA3 region of Wanneroo ranks as number two nationally for dwelling approvals, with 3,406 new homes approved for construction over the twelve months to November 2014. The Swan region ranked second highest across Western Australia and 8th nationally with 2,557 new dwelling approvals. The urban form of Perth housing continues to be mostly focussed on detached housing, with only 23% of new dwelling approvals being for multi-unit dwellings only Hobart shows a lower proportion at 11% . With home value growth slowing and both sales volumes and rents falling, buyers of new homes, particularly if they are buying for investment purposes, should be cautious. Despite recording the lowest number of dwelling approvals of any state or territory over the twelve months ending November 2014, dwelling approvals across Tasmania have been trending higher to reach their highest point since early 2012. The most significant level of approval activity over the twelve months to November last year was located in the north of the state at Launceston where 329 dwellings were approved for construction. 58% of Darwin dwelling approvals over the twelve months to November 2014 were for multi-unit dwellings, the highest proportion of apartment approvals outside of Sydney. The largest development pipeline, based on dwelling approvals over the twelve month period, was at Palmerston with 818 new dwelling approvals a majority of which were units. The annual number of dwelling approvals has been trending lower across the Australian Capital Territory since early 2014 as housing market conditions broadly soften across the national capital. The Gungahlin region remains the most popular location for dwelling approvals across the Territory, with 2,160 new dwelling approvals over the twelve month period ending November last year. That figure is almost three times higher than the next most popular SA3 location, Cotter-Namadji, where 762 dwellings were approved for construction. Buyers and developers of new stock should be cautious given that values, sales volumes and rental rates are currently falling in Canberra.

Melbourne house owners on track for another year of growth

Residential dwelling values in Melbourne returned to trend in January with a 2.7 per cent rise recorded by CoreLogic RP Data in the latest home value indices results read results here . This sets the Melbourne property market up for another stable year with moderate value increases likely, particularly in the detached house market. Melbourne home owners have seen stable growth in values for two years now and are more likely to record a profit when selling now. House values in the city grew the strongest with a 2.8 per cent rise compared to 1.7 per cent for units. This takes the growth in values over 12 months to 7.5 per cent for houses and 2.7 per cent for units. The rise in property values will be welcomed by vendors seeking to sell over the summer and in autumn as it suggests the poorer performance recorded in November and December last year was a consequence of high supply levels in spring and summer. Demand is not limitless and there is still some caution from buyers. Based on settled sales the median price of a house in the past three months was $613,000 and $480,000 for a unit. The performance of the auction market provides little indication of the markets health due to the very low auction numbers in January and their geographic diversity. Volumes are likely to rise strongly over the next few weeks. Melbourne continues to have the lowest rental yields in Australia with 3.2 per cent for houses and 4.2 per cent for units. This does not appear to have a negative impact on investors who are happy to wait for capital gains. Robert Larocca Victorian Housing Market Specialist CoreLogic RP Data

Low volume of capital city auctions this week

January has seen a fairly typical commencement to the auction market with only 419 auctions held. The market moves up a notch this week with 800 expected across Australia and 391 in capital cities. The volume of auctions in capital cities should rise to exceed 1,000 in the middle of February, as most real estate agents need to allow a reasonable marketing period for the property. It is also fairly typical to see the majority of auctions outside the capital cities and that is the case this week. The highest volume of auctions is expected in Adelaide with 97. There are 94 expected in Sydney, 80 in Melbourne, 72 in Brisbane, 24 in Perth and 21 in Canberra. Before the auction market increases significantly in volume it is useful to reflect on how 2014 ended. On a national basis there 101,444 auctions held in capital cities, the first time ever the volume has exceeded 100,000. Melbourne had the most auctions with 44,089 and just exceeded Sydney for the most sold. The most significant shift in 2014 was the growth in the Sydney auction market. If this is sustained this year it will be difficult for Melbourne to retain the title of the “auction capital”. The highest clearance rate for 2014, 74%, was recorded in Sydney. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Residential Property Listings – What’s happening and how does it compare to last year?

Each week, CoreLogic RP Data monitors residential properties coming to the market for sale through what is commonly known as ‘listing activity’. Listings are tracked across three different categories; houses, units and vacant land. Listing counts provide a comprehensive look at stock currently available for sale at a national level and across each state and territory. CoreLogic RP Data also tracks listing volumes across the combined capital cities as well as in each individual Australian capital city. One of the key benefits of this data set is that it can be used to monitor stock levels over time. The listings volumes are a key indicator of how the property market is tracking at any given time. Paired with the number of transactions, listings volumes help to provide a good indication of how balanced a market is, and what proportion of stock is available for sale or is being turned over. Similarly, listings can be paired with sales volumes to help us work out the effective supply across the market and how many months of stock are available at any one time. Over the four weeks ending 25 January 2015 there were 29,107 new listings added to the market and the total number of properties available for sale was 229,453. While not surprising, off the back of the end of year slow down, new listings are much lower than they were three months ago when over the four weeks ending 21 September 2014, 42,650 new listings were added to the market nationally. In comparison to the same time last year, we can see that new listings coming onto the market across Australia are currently -8.3 per cent lower, however, total stock levels are just -2.2 per cent lower. Similarly across the capital city markets, the total number of new listings that were added to the market over the four weeks ending 25 January 2015 16,352 were -6.6 per cent lower this year, compared to last year and total listings 89,521 are -4.1 per cent lower. What is interesting is that across the combined capital cities for the majority of 2014, total listings on a rolling four week basis remained lower than at the same time in 2013. However, new listings numbers were higher in comparison to the previous year for much of the first half of the year and a similar trend was seen in October and November. The fact that new listings were higher, but total listings were lower suggests that stock was being absorbed faster than it was in 2013. This can be further quantified by looking at sales volumes over the start of 2014. Between January and May, the total number of houses and units sold was higher on a month-by-month basis than the previous year, while sales volumes began to ease slightly towards the end of the year. Furthermore, the average time on market trended lower in 2014 further highlighting a more rapid rate of sale. As shown in the above graphs, we know from previous years that the number of homes available for sale will start to ramp up over the next few weeks and we will also see more activity begin to resume across the auction market which over the past six weeks has been relatively quiet. Similarly, we have also seen the CoreLogic RP Data Listings Index pick up after the seasonal slowdown, with the index up 31.6 per cent over the week ending 25 January 2015. This Index is a lead indicator for residential dwellings being prepared for sale, so the rise in the Index is clearly signifying the conclusion of the quiet end of year period.

Melbourne’s ‘Mega suburbs’!

Key points Reservoir is the largest suburb in Melbourne Gilderoy is the smallest suburb in Melbourne The are 12 suburbs in Melbourne with over 10,000 houses Most weeks when the highest volume of auctions are listed, the suburbs of Reservoir, Glen Waverly and Mount Waverly come out near the top. Auctions may well be a popular method of sale in these suburbs but their appearance in the list is more likely due to the fact that they are three of Melbourne’s largest areas. Melbourne’s progressive growth over the past 180 years has seen suburbs planned and developed in many different ways. Sometimes geography provides natural borders and sometimes the common ownership by one developer provided the impetus for the naming or borders. Sometimes names and borders have even moved. As a result Melbourne suburbs vary from 13,741 houses in Reservoir to 18 in Gilderoy. At more than 67km from the CBD the small ‘suburb’ of Gilderoy is more representative of it being a town than a considered decision to create a small suburb. There are 12 suburbs in total that have more than 10,000 houses. Each is bigger than medium-sized regional centres such as, Mildura, Shepparton and Warrnambool and without outlying suburbs. Those 12 suburbs are Reservoir, Frankston, Glen Waverly, Berwick, St Albans, Pakenham, Point Cook, Werribee, Mount Waverly, Hoppers Crossing, Craigieburn and Sunbury. Interestingly many of those were once separate towns which have now expanded considerably as they have become more proximate to the cities outer edge. As many of those are still being developed they are likely to grow further. The vagaries of place naming and suburb size become even more obvious when the case of Croydon is considered. On its own, Croydon is a large but not massive suburb with 7,293 houses. But once neighbouring Croydon North, South and Hills are considered, its size grows to 12,446 houses. When buying in larger suburbs it is therefore sensible to consider where specifically a home is as factors such as distance from a train station, park or school may vary considerably. The form of housing may vary as well. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

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The Federal Government is to shortly release a white paper on taxation reform. Plenty of recent inquiries and taxation documents have specifically noted that the taxation treatment of property should be reviewed and if ever there was a good time to look at changes to stamp duty it would be now. Given where the property market now stands any changes to stamp duty should be implemented sooner rather than later especially given home value growth is slowing and transaction volumes are trending lower. Of course, state governments are heavily reliant on stamp duty revenue and are therefore reluctant to have it removed although we will discuss how these issues can be overcome. Stamp duty is a tax which is payable when someone chooses to purchase a home. Home owners will generally move home because their current home is too big or too small for their needs or because they have changed jobs and need to move elsewhere to be closer to employment. The impost of stamp duty discourages people from moving to more appropriate accommodation. If you don’t yet own your home and are considering purchasing your first home, stamp duty is an additional upfront cost which can make purchasing a home even more difficult. The above chart tracks home sales over time and as you can see, after transaction activity peaked in the boom of 2001 to 2004 it has trended much lower ever since. Although home values have been increasing over the past two and a half years and sales volumes have increased, the rise has been moderate. When sales hit a low point in October 2011 there had been 409,582 house and unit sales nationally over the year. Transaction volumes rose to as high as 490,326 sales over the 12 months to July 2014 which represents an increase of 19.7 per cent. The recent peak in sales was -22.9% lower than the all-time peak of 635,661 sales over the 12 months to May 2002. While increasing home values may make home owners feel wealthier, when you buy your next home stamp duty is calculated based on the purchase price so you have to also pay a higher amount of stamp duty. Over the past, two and a half years, home values have increased by a total of 20.7% across the combined capital cities. Most of that growth has occurred in Sydney and Melbourne however, values have risen across all capital cities. What this means is that when people are buying homes the increase in value is also increasing the stamp duty burden for the next purchaser and subsequently providing additional taxation revenue to government. The impost of stamp duty is also a further barrier to market entry for first home buyers despite some states offering discounts and incentives to first time buyers. Furthermore, stamp duty is acting as a disincentive for home owners from moving eg. upgrading or downsizing to more suitable or appropriately located housing. Data released last year by the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS showed that across the state and territory governments there was almost $36 billion in taxation revenue from property note this is both residential and other property types over the 2012-13 financial year. Stamp duty was the second largest source of tax revenue at $12.841 billion with only municipal rates at $14.192 billion being higher. Over the year, as home values and sales rose, stamp duty revenue increased by 16.9%. Home values moved even higher during the 2013/14 financial year and sales rose further so it is reasonable to expect a further significant increase in stamp duty revenue. At CoreLogic RP Data we have noted a reduction in sales over recent months and the rate of capital city home value growth is slowing, while this may not be enough to impact stamp duty revenue in 2014/15 it will probably start having an impact by 2015/16 of course different states will see the impact at different times . The point is because stamp duty is a tax collected on the purchase of a home it is collected from a relatively small proportion of the population and is an unreliable source of tax reliant on demand for homes at any given time which can ebb and flow substantially. Although I am an advocate for stamp duties removal I do realise that state government will need to raise that revenue elsewhere. I am also not an advocate for more taxes however, a blanket land tax, paid by all home owners, would seem to make more sense. It is a way of guaranteeing revenue each year as well as broadening the tax base for this revenue rather than just relying on those purchasing properties. Over the 2012-13 financial year $12.841 million was collected in stamp duty, the ABS estimates that as at June 2013 there were 9,226,900 residential dwellings. Based on this dwelling count, land tax of $1,391.69 annually per residential dwelling would cover the cost of this foregone revenue. Keep in mind that stamp duty is collected from any property transaction so revenue would be higher when you include land sales and sales of other property types. This would potentially allow for a reduction in the overall land tax rate per household. By broadening the base of tax collection governments would provide themselves greater surety of revenue as well as assisting the housing market by reducing the costs associated with those who consider it necessary to move home. Given the concerns about investor activity in the market and considering they already reap the benefits of negative gearing perhaps a higher rate of land tax for investment properties should also be a consideration for any stamp duty reform. With home value growth slowing and sales volumes falling, now would seem like the right time to reform stamp duty. Although the impact of a slowing market won’t be felt straight away, no doubt that in years to come Governments will be left with a revenue hole as the effects of the housing market slowdown hit their tax revenue. Providing governments with a higher level of guaranteed revenue would seem like a good idea even if it unfortunately would mean an additional tax for everyone rather than for just those buying property. Note that the ACT is already going down the track of removing stamp duty. In last year’s budget the government announced a plan to phase out the tax over the next 20 years with rates gradually increasing to make-up for the revenue shortfall. Over the period stamp duty rates continue to fall. While the phasing out is commendable I still feel that now is the time to remove stamp duty across the board.

How buyers can use auction results to be better buyers

Key facts Attendence at auctions important for buyer research Clearance Rates – in 2014 these fell to 68.4% Auctions increased to take advantage of rising market In many respects the Melbourne auction market last year was better than in 2013. Auction volumes rose 19.7 per cent compared to last year, however the clearance rate fell a small degree from 69.2 per cent to 68.4 per cent. While there is a great degree of interest in data associated with the auction market, what exactly should buyers be looking at to help inform their judgement? Firstly, when undertaking market analysis it is important to get as much information as possible and understand the data in context, after all the sale of a new home means something different to the sale of an established one. Auctions can provide a rich source of information, even if you are not bidding. Auctions account for around one in five sales in capital cities and nearly one third in Melbourne. With that in mind there are three important things for buyers to look at from auctions; Number of Buyers: The number of active buyers is a slice of the people you are competing against in a given area. If you go to enough open houses and auctions you will get a feel about how strong demand is in an area and that will affect the price you need to pay.. Sale Price or passed in amount : Buyers will be able to compare the sale prices with their expectations of price, even if it is passed in. This information will help you make informed judgments about the market when bidding on the home you want. You can then see this data the day after, however it’s far better to turn up and see it live. Local Auction Conduct: Auctions can be a high-pressure event, as a result the more you attend the more used to the process you will get which in turn will help you stick to your budget and strategy. Attending auctions in the area you aim to buy in will allow you to become acquainted with the styles of different auctioneers and the level of competition in the area. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Boroondara sellers make $232m in three months

Key facts 35.7% of sellers made a 100% or higher profit Sellers in Boroondara made the highest total profit of $232m 98.6% of sellers in Knox made a profit The latest CoreLogic RP Data Pain and Gain Report compares the sale price with purchase price for all homes sold in the most recent quarter and for which there is comprehensive data available. Note: The report does not cover developer sales. The central message of the CoreLogic RP Data Pain & Gain Report is that owners are more likely to make a profit if they hold the property for a reasonable length of time, especially when the upfront impost of stamp duty and other transaction costs are taken into account. For example, nationally, 3.3 per cent of sellers made a 100 per cent profit selling within one year of buying and almost passed this mark by half after 10 years of ownership. In the September quarter last year, 6.5 per cent of sellers in Melbourne made a loss in nominal terms. This was a slight improvement on the 6.6 per cent in the June quarter and a substantial improvement on the 7.4 per cent a year ago. On a more local basis there are two ways of looking at the data; the proportion of sellers that made a profit and the gross profit made. Obviously the total profit made was higher in the more expensive municipalities. For example the highest profit was recorded in Boroondara at $232m. By comparison the total profit in Brimbank was $66m. The other way of assessing the data looks at the proportion of owners who made a profit. Of municipalities wholly within the metropolitan area Knox topped the list with 98.6 per cent. It was followed by Monash on 97.4 per cent, Casey with 96.6 per cent and both Glen Eira and Whitehorse with 96.4 per cent. Interestingly this demonstrates that through medium to long-term ownership a profit can be found in more than just the most expensive parts of Melbourne. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The 2014 Melbourne rental market

Key facts Median advertised rent for a house in Melbourne $448 Median rent for house rise 2.5 per cent in 2014, units 1.9 per cent Melbourne yields lowest of all capital cities Historically speaking, the performance of last year’s rental market in Melbourne was relatively moderate. In the last three months of 2014 the median advertised rent for a house in Melbourne increased by a minor 0.3 per cent to $448 per week, the opposite to the -0.3 per drop in the unit market. September’s result is reflective of the broader performance of the rental market over 2014 where low rental growth and low yields persisted. Over the course of 2014 house rents increased by 2.5 per cent and units increased by 1.9 per cent. For houses, 2014 was not dissimilar to the past five years. On a annualised basis, rents rose by 2.5 per cent in 2013, 1.3 per cent in 2012, 2.7 per cent in 2011. The only year that recorded a substantially different result was 2010 when rents grew 5.5 per cent. The unit market recorded similar results. In many respects the rental market is following the changes in value seen in the ownership market. With the exception of the unit market, the last two years were similar and 2010 saw boom-like conditions. Similar to the ownership market, the biggest question for 2015 is whether the growth in supply in the unit segment will further moderate advertised rents. Yields remained low. For both units 4.2 per cent and houses 3.3 per cent the yield in Melbourne is the lowest of all capital cities. This does not seem to concern investors who are clearly focused on the longer term prospects for capital gains. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Housing finance commitments start to ease in November 2014

The November 2014 housing finance data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS indicates that demand for mortgages is starting to wane. We would expect that this trend will continue over the coming year as APRA crack down on higher risk mortgage lending and focus on curtailing growth to the investment segment of the market. In November 2014, the total value of housing finance commitments fell by -1.0%. The total value of owner occupier housing finance commitments fell by -0.2% with owner occupier refinance commitments 0.1% higher while owner occupier new loan commitments fell by -0.3%. The investor segment of the market recorded a sharp fall in lending over the month down -2.2% following rises over the previous six months. Year-on-year housing finance commitments have increased by 7.3% which is their slowest rate of year-on-year growth since January 2013. The year on year increase in the value of housing finance commitments has decelerated from a peak of 26.6% in December 2013. Owner occupier refinance commitments rose 18.2%, owner occupier new loan commitments fell -1.8% and investment finance commitments rose 13.0%. Although lending to the housing investment segment is up 13.0% over the year, this represents the lowest year-on-year growth rate since December 2012. The first chart above shows the total value of housing finance commitments over time broken down by owner occupier refinances, owner occupier new loans and investors. While lending for home refinance and investment purposes have continued to trend higher over the past year there has been clear weakness in the new loans to owner occupiers segment. Investor commitments fell -2.2% in November and with APRA trying to slow the growth in lending to investors we would expect the investment segment will follow the lead of the owner occupier new loan segment over the coming year with growth continuing to slow. The total value of housing finance commitments in November 2014 was recorded at $29.0 billion. Over the month there was $11.8 billion in commitments to owner occupier new loans 40.5% , $5.5 billion in owner occupier refinances 19.1% and $11.7 billion in investment loans 40.4% . The proportion of lending to investors eased over the month however, if refinances are excluded the proportion of lending to this segment is still extremely high, accounting for 49.9% of lending commitments for housing. The third chart shows the rolling annual change in housing finance commitments excluding refinances versus the rolling annual change in combined capital city home values. Refinances are excluded because the data is used as a proxy for demand for new borrowings to purchase a home. As you can see there is a correlation between growth in housing finance commitments slowing and growth in home values slowing. Currently we are seeing growth in both housing finance commitments and home values trending lower and we expect that this trend will continue over the coming year. Demand for mortgages remains strong despite the fact that it has started to ease over recent months. With APRA writing to Australian banks, building societies and credit unions late last year reinforcing sound residential mortgage practices we would expect a further slowdown in mortgage demand in 2015. Consequently we would also anticipate that this will result in a slowdown in the rate of growth in home values as demand eases. We have already seen demand from the owner occupier market segment slow over the past year. With APRA advising Australia’s banking sector that they will be watching closely those that grow their investor mortgage book by materially more than 10% year-on-year, the investor segment may well follow suit in 2015.

Melbourne home values rise faster south of the Yarra in 2014

CoreLogic RP Data Melbourne Property Values report – 2014 The top 10 Melbourne suburbs ranked by growth in house values in 2014 were dominated by some of the cities most expensive suburbs and they were located south of the Yarra. Overall, the Melbourne housing market produced a near repeat of 2013 with house values rising by 8.4 per cent and units recorded a rise of 1.1 per cent as a result of high levels of supply; particularly in the inner city high rise market. Armadale, Caulfield North and Kew experienced the highest growth in house values and this is reflective of a number of factors including that the strongest rate of value growth being recorded in the middle and upper segments of the market. The appearance of Box Hill in the Top 10 highlights the continual popularity of the group of suburbs around Balwyn and Mont Albert. Over the last decade these suburbs have provided the best capital gains for owners. These suburbs have broad appeal for myriad reasons such as close proximity to local amenities such as parks, a range of transport choices, local shopping nodes and accessibility to the central business district. At a broader level, the fundamentals of the Melbourne property market remain sound. A major contributor to these fundamentals is the positive impact on housing market from supportive monetary policy in the form of a record low interest rate. Furthermore, ongoing strong overseas migration to Victoria and a record high influx of residents moving to the state from the rest of Australia also helps to support housing demand. House value growth slowed from 3.8% in the September 2014 quarter to just 1.1% over the final quarter of 2014. My big question for the summer and autumn markets is whether this was simply due to higher levels of supply or the start of a softer trend.

A record high number of dwelling approvals in November 2014

The November 2014 dwelling approvals data has been released and it makes for very positive reading. In November there were 18,245 dwelling approvals across the nation. The dwelling approvals data is published from July 1983 and from that month until November 2014 there has never been more approvals over a one month period. Dwelling approvals increased by 7.6% over the month and year-on-year they have increased by 10.1%. Looking at the approvals data, the 18,245 monthly approvals were comprised of 9,404 house and 8,841 unit approvals. House approvals were actually -0.2% lower over the month while unit approvals increased by 17.2%. As the chart above shows, unit approvals tend to be much more volatile than house approvals. Unit approvals are trending higher once again while house approvals are flat. Year-on-year, house approvals have increased by 3.6% compared to a much larger 18.0% increase in unit approvals. There is now a substantial pipeline of dwellings approved for construction. Over the 12 months to November 2014 there were 199,174 new dwellings approved for construction. The annual number of dwelling approvals is approaching 200,000 and is also at an all-time high. Over the past year there were 113,734 houses and 85,439 unit approvals. House approvals have increased by 15.5% and unit approvals have risen by 11.3%. To further highlight the significant number of approvals of late, over the past two years there have been 374,401 new dwellings approved for construction. If we assume the Census figure of 2.6 persons per household, that is enough housing approvals for 973,443 persons. Looking at the relationship between dwelling approvals and population growth we see there has been a significant improvement over the past year or so. Population growth is now trending lower while dwelling approvals are at record high levels. There still remains a significant gap between population growth and dwelling approvals, as has been the case for the past decade, but the gap between housing demand and housing supply is improving. Importantly, net overseas migration which creates more housing demand than natural increase is trending much lower. The population data is only currently published up until June 2014 however, if population growth continues to trend lower and overseas arrivals and departures data indicates that it will this bodes well for a better balance between population growth and approvals. It should also go some way to easing pressure on housing both from a purchase and rental perspective. The capital cities have also had a record month in November with an all-time high 14,816 dwelling approvals over the month. Capital city dwelling approvals were 1.4% higher over the month and have increased by 13.4% year-on-year. In November there were 6,207 capital city house approvals and 8,609 unit approvals. Unit approvals reached an all-time high and were 14.9% higher over the month while house approvals fell by -12.8% and were at their lowest level in five months. Year-on-year capital city house approvals have increased by 5.9% compared to a 19.5% rise in unit approvals. Similar to the national figures, the chart shows that unit approvals across the capital cities tend to be much more volatile than house approvals. The other trend to note is that how over recent years the number of unit approvals has regularly outnumbered house approvals. This reflects the growing appetite for unit product, particularly within inner city areas of the capital cities. Given some earlier concerns that dwelling approvals were starting to fall, this month’s result is quite encouraging. Of course, the rebound was driven by the volatile unit market which could just as easily reverse next month. Nevertheless, when you see a record number of monthly dwelling approvals and annual approvals are at an all-time high it is a positive result. Furthermore, with population growth slowing, if approvals can hold at or close to current levels, a better balance between population growth can be achieved. In-turn this would likely ease some of the value and rental growth pressures in the market. Overall it is a very good result and it would be economically beneficial to see approvals remain at these elevated levels over the next 12 months. Of course, with value growth already slowing across the capital cities and sales volumes trending lower it may start to become more difficult for some of these developers, particularly those of unit product, to achieve sufficient presales to commence construction. While the pipeline of approvals is very strong, it will be important to monitor just how many of these approvals ultimately make it to completion. Particularly given the number of unit approvals is at an unprecedented level.

Capital city auctions to exceed 100,000 for the first time

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 21 December 2014 There are 1,807 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,489 auctions expected compared to 1,332 for the same period last year. With one week to go, the combined capital cities clearance rate for 2014 is 67.9 per cent compared to 66.2 per cent last year. Once this week’s auctions are finalised, the number of auctions held in capital cities this year will exceed 100,000 for the first time. Excluding this week, there has been a 22 per cent rise on last year with 25 per cent more homes selling. Sydney’s auction market experienced the most significant improvement this year where the clearance rate and share of sales by auction increased. Adelaide and Canberra also had notable improvements. The likelihood of these improvements being repeated next year is largely dependent on the state of the broader economy. The use of auctions for residential sales also increased in five of the capital cities this year. Preliminary figures for Melbourne show that the proportion of homes sold by auction rose from 30 per cent last year to 31.3 per cent this year.There are 565 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,585 last week, and 531 this time last year. Sydney is expecting 562 auctions compared to 1,357 last week and 532 for this week last year. The use of auctions reached an all-time high with 27.6 per cent of all homes being sold by auction compared to 22 per cent last year. This increase was a result of real estate agents and vendors seeking to take advantage of the improved market. In Brisbane 160 auctions are expected after 252 were held last week. Compared to last year the use of auctions as a sales method remained stable at 5.7 per cent of all sales. Adelaide is expecting 111 auctions, compared to 171 last week. Last year Adelaide recorded 8.2 per cent of sales by auction and this year it has risen to 9.4 per cent. Canberra has 70 auctions scheduled compared to 69 last week. Canberra saw a significant rise in the use of auctions, from 13.4 per cent of sales last year to 17.3 per cent this year. Perth has 16 auctions compared to 51 last week. Auctions remain a very small part of the Peth market with only 1.6 of sales by auction this year compared to 1.5 per cent last year. There are 11 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Marrickville NSW with 13 expected. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 21 December, 2014

There are 565 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 531 for the same time last year. This is the last week for the year in which there are expected to be a substantial volume of auctions. Until early February next year there will be a small number of auctions weekly, mostly outside of the metropolitan area. With one week to go this year the auction market has seen more homes sold by more people. The clearance rate for 2014 is likely to be marginally lower, around 68.6 per cent, than 2013 when it was 69.2 per cent. With one week to go there have been 43,298 auctions held, 17.8 per cent more than last year and 29,632 homes selling. Weeks with over 1,000 auctions used to be a rarity but with 22 occurring this year they are now a regular feature of the market. In the private sale market conditions continue to be healthy for sellers. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was stable at 31 days over the last week and vendor discounting was also stable at -5 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 14 December: 68.6% Melbourne auctions expected week ending 21 December: 565 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 14 December: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 14 December: -5 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 1.3 per cent lower in month ending 14 December seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The economic factors to watch for in 2015 that may impact the housing market

The combined capital city housing markers have seen values increase by 7.0% over the first 11 months of 2014. Throughout the whole of 2013, capital city home values increased by 9.8% indicating that the rate of home value growth is likely to be lower this year than last. On an annualised basis, combined capital city home value growth peaked at 11.5% in April of this year and has slowed to 8.5% over the 12 months to November 2014. As we enter 2015 it is our expectation that the housing market will see another year of home value growth, but not likely at the same pace as experienced over the 2014 or 2013 calendar years. Although this is our base-case scenario, there will still be plenty of potential headwinds to watch out for that may impact on the housing market. Unemployment The national unemployment rate was recorded at 6.3% in November 2014 which is the highest unemployment rate since September 2002. The Mid Year Economic and Fiscal Update MYEFO was released earlier this week by the Federal Government. In the document the Government revised up its forecast of the unemployment rate to 6.5% at the end of the current and the next financial year. It isn’t just the high rate of unemployment which remains a concern. Over the past year, the majority of new employment has been part-time positions which have increased by 2.5% over the year compared to a 0.7% increase in full-time employment. The data also showed that in November 2014 the underemployment rate had increased to 8.6% which was its highest on record. This is reflective of the strong growth in part-time employment, many working part-time would probably like to be working more hours or in full-time employment. With comparatively high rates of unemployment and growing underemployment it has the potential to impact on housing demand. If employees become concerned about job security they will be less inclined to commit to purchasing a home. Furthermore, if employees can work as much as they like and subsequently earn as much as they’d like they may also not be able to purchase a home. New APRA steps to reinforce sound residential mortgage lending practices Last week APRA the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority wrote to all Australian authorised deposit-taking institutions ADIs . The letter highlighted further steps that will reinforce sound lending practices. Although the note didn’t indicate that any macroprudential tools would be formally implemented, the letter noted that APRA will be increasing supervisory surveillance to reinforce sound lending practices. This is in response to specific prudential concerns which are detailed below: Risk profile – higher risk lending such as high loan to income and high loan to valuation ratios, interest-only lending to owner occupiers for lengthy periods and long term lending are of specific concern. APRA is concerned about lenders undertaking larger than normal volumes of lending in these areas Investor lending – fast or accelerating credit growth in this space can be a key indicator of growing risk. APRA highlighted that annual investor credit growth that was materially above 10% per annum will be an indicator of increased risk. Serviceability assessments – APRA is of the view that mortgages should have a serviceability buffer of at least 2% above the loan product rate and with a minimum floor assessment rate of 7% Through these guidelines they have advised the ADIs of the lending environment they expect. Although there have been no blanket macroprudential tools, the letter is pointed and notes that ADIs that do not adhere to these rules will be under review to stricter lending limits. These guidelines are likely to have an impact on the residential housing market. Firstly the very strong growth in investor housing demand over the past two years will likely taper to a more moderate pace. Secondly, some borrowers who are stretching themselves financially to enter the market may find accessing home loans increasingly difficult due to the new serviceability guidelines. Household income growth While home values have increased by 8.5% over the 12 months to November 2014, real household incomes have increased by just 0.8%. One wonders how long home value growth can continue to outpace household income growth. Over the 10 years to September 2014 nominal home values have increased 52.4% compared to real household income growth of 36.4%. These two figures are not significantly different and real home value growth has actually been lower than growth in household incomes. This would seemingly suggest that the current surge in home values, which has started to slow, cannot continue all that much longer without income growth. Consumer sentiment According to the Westpac and Melbourne Institute’s monthly measure of consumer sentiment, consumers have been more pessimistic than optimistic for 10 consecutive months. To put that in perspective, consumers haven’t been this consistently gloomy since the depths of the financial crisis in 2008 and early 2009. Further highlighting the consumer gloom the data shows that when respondents were asked about the wisest place for savings 40.3% chose a banks, building societies and credit unions. This was the highest reading since September 2012. Over the past 15 years, an average of 27.5% of respondents have chosen this segment, highlighting the heightened sense of consumer anxiety. The level of consumer anxiety is more confronting when you consider that those with savings in a financial institution are currently earning virtually no interest with the cash rate sitting at 2.5%. Consumer sentiment is closely correlated with housing demand. If consumers are feeling less confident about the overall economic conditions, they are going to be much less likely to make high commitment decisions such as taking out a new mortgage. Housing finance commitments We have already highlighted that APRA is concerned with the heightened level of investment lending and have provided stricter guidelines for Australian ADIs regarding to this segment of the market. Housing finance data shows that investors are currently the primary driver of housing demand. In October 2014, there were $11.7 billion in housing finance commitments to owner occupiers for new loans, $5.4 billion to owner occupiers for refinancing purposes and $12.1 billion to investors. Year-on-year, owner occupier new loan commitments are 0.8% higher, owner occupier refinances have risen 18.1% and investment loan commitments are 19.8% higher. Owner occupier new loans and investor loans are a much larger driver than refinances. With the new APRA guidelines it looks as if lending to the investor cohort will slow in 2015. It is unlikely this can simply be replaced by lending to owner occupiers for new loans. In fact, new lending to owner occupiers has been trending lower since it peaked at $12 billion in lending in November 2013. If lending to investors slows as owner occupier lending is already doing, it seems that there will be less mortgage demand and subsequently less property transactions. In turn, this is likely to result in lower levels of capital growth across the housing market. Dwelling approvals Dwelling approvals have lifted significantly throughout the past two years, providing a significant pipeline of new construction. Although dwelling approvals have eased over recent months, over the 12 months to October 2014 there were 197,529 dwelling approvals which is hovering around the highest annual number on record. On a monthly basis dwelling approvals peaked in January 2014 and although they remain high, they have trended lower. An important feature of dwelling approvals is that the number of multi-unit dwellings being approved is at near record highs. There is growing demand for inner city units however, a unit development is typically a riskier development proposition than a detached house and ultimately multi-unit dwelling approvals are less likely to proceed into the construction phase. If growth in home values slows throughout 2015 along with a slowdown in housing transactions, we may see some of the pipeline of approvals, particularly unit approvals, not actually make it to construction. In order to commence construction developers typically require a certain level of pre-sales to begin. If sales slow, achieving a sufficient level of presales may become more difficult and may potentially jeopardise some of the progress of these projects. Recommendations for new foreign investment rules The House of Representatives Standing Committee on Economics recently released its findings and recommendations following a review of foreign investment. The four key findings of the report were: Recognising there is no accurate or timely data that tracks foreign investment in residential real estate, the Committee recommended the establishment of a national register of land title transfers that records the citizenship and residency status of all purchasers of Australian real estate. Improving the inner workings of the Foreign Investment Review Board FIRB . Bolstering the compliance and enforcement regime of the foreign investment rules. Recommending an application fee of $1500 for each approval application made to FIRB by non-resident foreign investors in order to fund improved administration and monitoring of the foreign investment rules undertaken by FIRB. The report also recommends the following civil penalties for breaches of the foreign investment framework: Financial penalties to be calculated as a percentage of the property value, rather than restricted to $85,000 as is currently the case; and The regime applies to both foreign investors and any third party who knowingly assists a foreign investor to breach the framework. Although these are just recommendations at this stage, one would hope that the committee’s recommendations do get implemented. More timely, accurate and reliable data about foreign buyers would certainly seem to be valuable and penalties for those who skirt the rules seems appropriate. Importantly, it is unlikely that any of these recommendations would act as a disincentive to foreign investment rather they would result in improved transparency about such investment. Australian dollar In Australia we generally like to compare our currency to the US dollar. After the end of month peak in the exchange rate of $1.08 in February 2012, the exchange rate has now fallen to $0.849 at the end of November. Importantly, most of the fall has occurred recently, six months earlier the exchange rate was $0.93. The fall in the trade weighted index TWI has not been as large as the fall relative to the US Dollar. The TWI was recorded at 68.2 at the end of November, down from 71.5 six month ago and a peak of 79.2 in February 2012. Nevertheless the Australian dollar has weakened. The lower dollar should provide some support for the Australian economy, making our exports more attractive and providing heightened demand for the struggling manufacturing sector. We suspect that demand from foreign buyers has grown over recent years. Furthermore, if the Australian dollar continues to depreciate, it is likely that Australian residential property will potentially become even more attractive for overseas buyers as the relative cost improves. Interest rates Official interest rates were recorded at 2.5% in December 2014, with no meeting of the Reserve Bank’s board in January they will remain at that level until at least February. The average standard variable mortgage rate is currently 5.95%, discounted variable rates are 5.1% as are three year fixed rates. The RBA has repeatedly stated that they believe a period of interest rate stability is the most prudent course. In an interview with the Australian Financial Review last week Glenn Stevens remarked that any change in interest rates would have to help boost confidence while a cut may do the opposite. Nevertheless, over recent months there have been a growing number of economists predicting the next movement in rates would be lower as the overall economic performance slows. The cash rate futures market is now also pricing in a 25 basis point rate cut to interest rates by June next year. A lower interest rate would seemingly make investment in housing even more attractive as returns on cash savings reduce further. Of course, if this were to occur it would likely take place in the face of slowing growth in housing demand and limits on just how much Australian ADIs can lend to the investment segment of the market. As the RBA has previously stated, there are limits to what monetary policy can do. Given this, a further 25 basis points cut to official interest rates may make little material difference to the residential property market….of course it could also make a substantial difference. Conclusion At CoreLogic we are of the view that home value growth will continue in 2015, albeit at a more moderate pace than what we have seen in 2014. As the above analysis shows there are plenty of factors which will impact on the housing market in 2015, not to mention potentially hundreds of other factors which could impact on the direction of the market. It will be important to keep track of the broader economic trends and consider how that may impact on your property in 2015.

Prahran joins million dollar club in Victoria

According to CoreLogic RP Data, Melbourne now has 52 suburbs with a median house value in excess of 1 million dollars – the data covers the 12 months ending in September. Melbourne’s most expensive suburb remains Toorak, with a median house value of $2.92m. The median sale price, which reflects the prices paid over the last year has for the first time, exceeded $3m. This indicates a slightly more expensive segment of Toorak has been selling over the last year. Toorak will clearly be the city’s first $3 million dollar suburb, its just a matter of when. There are three other suburbs with medians in excess of two million, Deepdene, Canterbury and Kooyong. From sales volumes perspective, the highest was in Brighton followed by Balwyn North, Kew, Glen Iris and Camberwell. Putting aside the cost, the million dollar suburb that proved the easiest to buy into was Deepdene were 14 per cent of houses sold in the last year. In contrast Fairfield was a tightly held suburb with only 2.8 per cent of houses selling. Two new suburbs in the list are Prahran and Williamstown. The median value of a house in Williamstown – the second suburb in the west to reach this level was $1.002m. Prahran’s median for a house is now $1m. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

2014 was a stronger year for auctions than 2013

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 14 December 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 65.2 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 63.7 per cent last week and 65.1 per cent this time last year. The market may have cooled since the start of spring but that won’t prevent the overall clearance rate for 2014 exceeding last year. In 2013 the capital cities clearance rate was 66.2 per cent and with one week to go this year it is 67.9 per cent. With the exception of Melbourne and Perth the clearance rate has risen in each capital city. More people have sold more homes at auction this year. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 71.2 per cent recorded compared to 66.1 per cent last week and 72.2 per cent last year. The Sydney auction market has delivered very good outcomes for sellers this year with a higher clearance rate and number of sales. The clearance rate for 2014 is likely to be close to 74.4 per cent, higher than 72.7 per cent last year. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 65.9 per cent was recorded compared to 66 per cent last week and 64.9 per cent this time last year. The clearance rate for 2014 is likely to be marginally lower, around 68.5 per cent, than 2013 when it was 69.2 per cent. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 47.3 per cent was recorded compared to 39.7 per cent last week. The overall clearance rate in Brisbane for 2014 is likely to be 45.8 per cent, higher than 41.5 per cent last year. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 57.5 per cent compared to 56.6 per cent last week. The overall clearance rate for 2014 is likely to be 61.9 per cent, higher than 56.5 per cent last year. In Canberra a clearance rate of 59.5 per cent was recorded. The overall clearance rate for 2014 is likely to be 55.9 per cent, higher than 52.3 per cent last year. In Perth a clearance rate of 33.3 per cent was recorded. The overall clearance rate for 2014 is likely to be 41.1 per cent, lower than 46.5 per cent last year. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

2014 housing market review and outlook for 2015

Combined capital city dwelling values fell by -0.3 per cent in November 2014 according to the CoreLogic RP Data Home Value Index. Over the month, values increased in four cities and fell across the remaining four. Values were higher over the month in Sydney, Brisbane, Perth and Hobart and were lower elsewhere. Over the first 12 months of the year, combined capital city home values have increased by 7.0 per cent. As a result, it looks as if home value growth in 2014 will be lower than the 9.8 per cent increase in 2013. Over the three months to November 2014, combined capital city home values rose by 0.8 per cent. The results over this period show that the growth in the market is quite narrow with only Sydney 3.1% , Brisbane 1.7% and Perth 0.4% recording value rises. Elsewhere, values fell over the three months by -1.6 per cent in Melbourne, -0.5 per cent in Adelaide, -2.5 per cent in Hobart, -2.1 per cent in Darwin and -3.3 per cent in Canberra. The rate of home value growth over the 12 months to November 2014 has continued to slow. After the annual rate of home value growth across the combined capitals peaked at 11.5 per cent in April it has slowed to a rate of 8.5 per cent in November. The 8.5 per cent growth over the year to November is the slowest rate of annual growth since November of last year. Sydney continues to be the key driver of capital growth with home values up 13.2 per cent over the past year. Melbourne has been the second strongest performer with values up 8.3 per cent and Brisbane home values are 6.0 per cent higher. Elsewhere, values have risen by 2.8 per cent in Adelaide, 1.4 per cent in both Perth and Darwin, 5.2 per cent in Hobart and 1.7 per cent in Canberra. The annual rate of home value growth is now lower than the recent peak across all capital cities other than Hobart. Houses have recorded a superior rate of value growth compared to units across the combined capital cities over the past year. Over the 12 months to November, capital city house values are 8.9 per cent higher compared to a 5.9 per cent rise in unit values. Across each capital city annual value growth for houses has been greater than that for units over the last year. Combined capital city home values are now 10.8 per cent higher than they were at their previous cyclical peak in October 2014. Between October 2010 and May 2012, combined capital city home values fell by a total of -7.7 per cent. From their low point in May 2012, combined capital city home values have increased by 19.6 per cent however, the value increases have been narrowly based. The greatest rises in values over the current growth phase have occurred in Sydney 31.2% , Melbourne 17.6% , Darwin 17.5% and Perth 15.5% . Growth across the remaining capital cities has been much more moderate with values rising 10.6 per cent in Brisbane, 7.4 per cent in Adelaide, 5.2 per cent in Hobart and 4.8 per cent in Canberra. As the data shows, Sydney has been the primary driver of value growth followed by Melbourne, Darwin and Perth albeit their growth has been somewhat lower than Sydney’s. CoreLogic estimates that over the third quarter of 2014 there were 53,962 capital city houses and 24,124 capital city units sold across the country. The number of home sales over the most recent three months is -2.8 per cent lower than over the same period in 2013. House sales are actually 1.0 per cent higher than a year ago while unit sales are -10.3 per cent lower. Importantly with so many off –the-plan sales taking place final numbers upon settlement of these projects may revise higher. Within the individual capital cities, sales over the last three months were lower than a year ago in Sydney, Perth and Canberra but still higher elsewhere. Selling conditions are still quite favourable in the market however, stock levels are starting to rise and there are variations across the cities. Discounting levels across the combined capital cities sat at 5.5 per cent while the average time on market is at an all-time low of 36 days. Remember that the stronger markets of Sydney and Melbourne are having a much greater impact on these figures. The number of new properties listed for sale across the combined capital cities is now 0.4 per cent higher than a year ago. Total listings are -2.4 per cent lower than they were a year ago however, they are currently at their highest level since the middle of December last year. With stock on market rising it will be very interesting to see what happens to time on market and discounting levels over the next few months. Value growth on an annual basis remains much stronger than rental growth however, the more recent weaker capital growth conditions have seen the decline in gross rental yields stall. Over the past 12 months, combined capital city rental rates have increased by just 1.9 per cent. House rents have increased by 1.8 per cent and unit rents are 2.3 per cent higher. Although rental growth is slow, rental rates have risen over the year in all capital cities except Perth, Darwin and Canberra. With a strong pipeline of dwellings both under construction and due for commencement it seems likely that the rate of rental growth will remain soft for the foreseeable future. Gross rental yields across the combined capital cities sit at 3.7 per cent for houses and 4.5 per cent for units. At the same time a year ago they were recorded at 4.0 per cent and 4.7 per cent however, yields have been on hold for the past four months for both houses and units. As always, there is likely to be a continued variance in performances from city to city and region to region. Much of the growth over the past two and a half years has occurred in Sydney and Melbourne and this appears to be continuing with the rise in values only moderate outside of these cities. Note that the annual rate of value growth in both Sydney and Melbourne has been slowing over recent months. Subsequent purchasers and investors are the main drivers of the market currently spurred by the low mortgage rate environment. From an investor’s perspective the best opportunity to enter the Sydney, Melbourne or Perth markets has likely passed, especially considering the strong value growth over the past year is now moderating and rental yields are low. The RBA has also flagged that they are concerned with the level of investment lending taking place in both Sydney and Melbourne and APRA has recently announced greater surveillance of mortgage lending, specifically investor and higher risk lending by the banks. It will be interesting to see whether investors start to turn their attention away from cities such as Sydney and Melbourne and towards higher yielding markets that are earlier in their value growth phase such as Brisbane and potentially Adelaide where value growth is now becoming more evident and the cost of housing is significantly lower than in Sydney and Melbourne. Of course, with APRA announcing that banks need to limit their growth in investment lending to around 10% per annum we would expect this will have a significant impact on investor demand for mortgages over the coming year. As a result of these changes and slowing home value growth, investors may potentially start looking at other asset classes. RP Data anticipates that the rate of capital growth, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne will continue to moderate over the coming year. We believe that home values will continue to increase over the coming year however, the rate of growth will continue to slow and markets such as Perth, Darwin and Canberra look susceptible to value falls over the coming year. ENDS. While you’re here… Watch the latest national housing market update, released December 2014, click on the following: Full version 8 minutes Short version 2 minutes Sydney, NSW Melbourne, VIC Brisbane, QLD Perth, WA Adelaide, SA

National Auction Preview; Week ending 14 December, 2014

Notable improvement in conditions for Sydney buyers There are 3,781 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,995 auctions expected, compared to 3,548 for the same period last year. A softening Sydney auction market has exacerbated the now typical reduction in the clearance rate as Christmas approaches. Improving conditions for buyers continue this week in Sydney, which has its 8th week with over 1,000 auctions. Compared to a month ago there is a lower clearance rate in all capital cities with the exception of Adelaide. There are 1,324 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,733 last week and 1,616 this time last year. Last week was the second largest weekend for auctions in the city’s history. The Sydney market is showning signs of excess supply with the clearance rate last week hitting a 18-month low of 66.1 per cent.. In Sydney, CoreLogic RP Data is expecting 1,166 auctions compared to 1,294 last week and 1,396 for this week last year. Mosman has the highest volume of auctions with 26 expected. In Brisbane 223 auctions are expected after 189 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 154 auctions, compared to 131 last week. Canberra has 64 auctions scheduled compared to 87 last week. Perth has 50 auctions compared to 57 last week There are 24 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Reservoir VIC which has 33 expected. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 14 December 2014

There are 1,324 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,616 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions will be in Reservoir which has 33 expected. Last week was the second largest weekend for auctions in the city’s history with 1,733 auctions compared to 1,837 in late October. The clearance rate dropped from 71 to 66 per cent; this comparison between the two almost identical weeks provides a very clear summary of the change in the market over two months. There are only 2 weekends for auctions now until Christmas. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale contracted from 32 to 31 days over the last week and vendor discounting eased slightly to -5 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 7 December: 66% Melbourne auctions expected week ending 14 December: 1,324 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 7 December: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 7 December: -5% houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.4 per cent higher in month ending 7 December seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Investment lending continues to surge in October, no wonder APRA are concerned

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS published housing finance data for October earlier today. The data release coincided with the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA sending Australian Authorised Deposit-taking Authorities ADIs a letter on Tuesday afternoon. The letter highlighted that APRA was going to increase surveillance on risky lending and have a specific focus in growth in investor lending by ADIs. The October housing finance data showed that the proportion of lending to investors had grown to fresh record highs while owner occupier lending is slowing. The value of housing finance commitments continues to become much more important than the headline number of commitments. The reason being that the number of commitments only coves owner occupier commitments, excluding investors completely which are the key driver of the current market. Furthermore, with APRA now focused on ADIs not growing housing credit to investors too fast, a focus on the value of lending becomes even more important. The above chart uses raw not seasonally adjusted data and uses a 12 month average to smooth the volatility of the data. The chart shows an ongoing decline in demand from owner occupier first home buyers and more recently a dip in commitments by owner occupiers that already own a home. Across the four borrower types listed you can see that investors now account for the greatest proportion of borrowings from ADIs. With values continuing to rise across capital city markets clearly they are a key driver of this growth. The second chart shows the monthly value of housing finance commitments across owner occupier new loans excluding refinances owner occupier refinances and investment loans. Over the month, owner occupier refinance commitments increased by 3.7%, owner occupier new loan commitments fell by -0.1%, while investment commitments rose by 1.0%. Year-on-year, the increases have been recorded at 18.1% for owner occupier refinances, 0.8% for owner occupier new loans and 19.8% for investment loans. With $5.4 billion in commitments for owner occupier refinance commitments in October, activity in this space continues to trend higher. Investment lending is also trending higher reaching a record high $12.1 billion in October. Meanwhile, owner occupier new loan commitments have actually pulled back a little of late. After monthly commitments sat at a record high $12.0 billion in November 2013, they have pulled back to $11.7 billion in October 2014. For only the second month on record, the value of investment loans was greater than the value of owner occupier new loans in October 2014. As a proportion of the value of all housing finance commitments, investors were steady at a record-high 41.4% in October. Owner occupier new loans accounted for 40.2% a new all-time low and owner occupier refinances accounted for 18.5% of lending, its greatest proportion since August 2012. If we just look at new lending, excluding refinances, investment lending reached a new all-time high of 50.8% of total lending in October, more than one in every two loans. The capital city housing market has been rising since hitting a low point in May 2012 and at that time investor housing finance commitments totalled $6.9 billion and 33.9% of all housing finance commitments. Clearly there has been a substantial surge in demand from this segment, recorded at $12.1 billion in October 2014 and 41.4% of all borrowings. The headline result that gets reported on each month is the number of owner occupier loans. Although it is a very valuable statistic, it should be read with caution because it is missing a significant proportion of the market, those represented by investors. As the above chart shows, much like the data on the value of commitments, the number of owner occupier new loan commitments is now trending lower while refinance commitments trend higher at a moderate pace. In October, the number of refinance commitments rose 3.6% while new loan commitments fell by -1.4%. Year-on-year, refinances are 7.5% higher while new loan commitments are -4.2% lower. The number of new loan commitments most recently peaked at 35,568 in November 2013 and has since fallen by -5.5% to 33,597 commitments in October 2014. There were 18,123 refinance commitments in October 2014, the highest monthly volume since February 2008. As investor activity has risen, there has been a sharp drop-off in the number of loans to first home buyers. Although there is no data to support it, there are plenty of anecdotal suggestions that many first home buyers are choosing to purchase investment properties rather than homes for owner occupation. Unfortunately, the ABS data only captures those homes purchased by first home buyers for owner occupation. Owner occupier first home buyer numbers continue to languish at near record low levels. The proportion of total owner occupier housing finance commitment to first home buyers hit a record low 11.6% in October 2014. The number of loans actually rose, up 1.2% over the month however, year-on-year first home buyer commitments are -7.8% lower. The Reserve Bank RBA has already highlighted a number of times that they have some concerns with the heightened level of investment activity, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne. With the proportion of loans to investors hitting a new record high in September it will further re-iterate those concerns. Just yesterday APRA wrote to ADIs highlighting some concerns about lending practices and providing a set of guidelines to ensure prudential standards are maintained. With investor activity continuing to rise in October, it seems the concerns are well found. We may see a further increase in the November data next month however, it is likely that growth in the value of investment finance commitments should start to ease thereafter. Of course, owner occupier lending demand is already slowing and if/when investment lending follows suit, demand for mortgages should ease and we would expect that it will also continue to contribute to a further slowing of home value growth. It will be interesting to see how the slowing of demand plays out from a new housing perspective. With the RBA hopeful that a heightened level of housing construction can help assist the economy as it transitions away from resource investment, as value growth slows some of these projects may be in jeopardy. Given most developers are private businesses, they generally need growing demand for housing and some increase in home values to allow enough pre-sales for the project to go ahead. We are already seeing sales volumes and home values trending lower, so if demand for mortgages softens further we will potentially see a fall in dwelling commencements despite the fact that there is such a strong pipeline of development in place. It will be interesting to see how this plays out in 2015.

Clearance rate remains lower than when spring started

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 7 December 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 66.6 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 63.7 per cent last week and 64.5 per cent this time last year. High auction volumes and a market where value growth is moderating explain why the capital city auction clearance rate has remained below 70 per cent for the past 10 weeks. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 71.7 per cent recorded compared to 70.6 per cent last week and 73.8 per cent last year. The market in Sydney may have eased from the perspective of the clearance rates however a longer term view shows the remarkable increase in homes offered at auction. Compared to the same recent 4 week period the number of auctions is up 22.6 per cent on last year and 90 per cent on 2012. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 67.1 per cent was recorded compared to 63 per cent last week and 63.3 per cent this time last year. This week was the second largest on record with the 1,823 auctions missing the previous high in late October by 14. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 35.2 per cent was recorded compared to 37.8 per cent last week. Not unlike other capital cities the Brisbane auction market is showing a lower clearance rate as we get closer to Christmas. In Adelaide a preliminary clearance rate of 68 per cent compared to 62.3 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 62.1 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 38.1 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

High yield, high capital gains in the Melbourne market

Investment decisions in property are often presented as choices between yield and capital gains. In Melbourne, there is a small selection of suburbs where both objectives can be met; they have above average capital gains and a yield higher than the citywide one. As past performance is not a guarantee of future performance in the property market these are not suburbs investors should automatically buy into, rather it shows that with some astute property hunting strong investment outcomes may be found. Over the past decade the compounding annual growth rate for a house in Melbourne was 5.77 per cent and 5.16 per cent for a unit. The gross rental yield over the last year for a house was 3.6 per cent and 4.1 per cent for a unit. In the unit market there were 34 suburbs that recorded capital growth and with yields in excess of the citywide outcome, and five of those stood out. In the market for houses there were 33 suburbs. The five standouts in the unit market, predominantly because of reasonable sales volumes providing opportunities for buyers, were Ferntree Gully, Brunswick West, Chelsea, Mount Martha and Boronia. In the market for houses the five that stood out were Bayswater, Altona North, Boronia, Collingwood and Mooroolbark. In it interesting to note that many suburbs in the outer eastern suburbs, around the base of Mount Dandenong, have recorded above average yields and capital gains over the past decade. The other area of Melbourne that has multiple suburbs with good capital gains and yield is in the inner east. Obviously the skill for an investor is not just finding the right suburb but the right property and that can take time and requires both research and a strong understanding of the local market. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

High volumes after new national auction record

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 7 December 2014 Last week saw the highest volume of auctions ever recorded in capital cities with 3,908 auctions held, 10 per cent more than the previous high of 3,548 in December last year. Volumes remain high this week. There are 3,851 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 3,226 auctions expected, compared to 3,213 for the same period last year. There are 1,570 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,635 last week and 1,535 this time last year. The trend of improved buyer conditions is strengthening after last week saw the lowest clearance rate in 6 months and the second highest volume of auctions on record. The trend was also reflected in the recent home value index that recorded a fall in house values fell of 2.8 per cent In Sydney, CoreLogic RP Data is expecting 1,204 auctions compared to 1,631 last week and 1,139 for this week last year. Once the final auction results were included last week was the largest auction week in Sydney’s history with 9 per cent more auctions than the previous high in April this year. In Brisbane 172 auctions are expected after 294 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 127 auctions, compared to 179 last week. Canberra has 82 auctions scheduled compared to 94 last week. Perth has 56 auctions compared to 62 last week There are 15 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Mosman NSW which has 39 expected. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

How does the current growth cycle compare to the 2001 to 2004 boom?

In this week’s blog we take a look at how current housing market conditions compare with the boom in home values between 2001 and early 2004. Immediately a point to note is that the current housing market upswing came off the back of dwelling values falling over the previous two years. If we assume that the previous boom period began at the start of 2001, there had actually been no home value falls prior to its commencement, rather the increase in home values had been more moderate at 6.6% over the 2000 calendar year. The previous boom ran from the beginning of 2001 until October 2004 across the combined capital cities. Over that 46 month period, home values rose by a total of 68.1% across the combined capital cities. This is a monthly rate of value growth over that period of almost 1.5%.The current rise in capital city home values commenced in June 2012 and up until November 2014 values had been trending higher for 30 months. Over this 30 month period combined capital city home values have increased by 19.6% or a monthly rate of growth of 0.7%. Again it is also important to consider that the current growth phase occurred off the back of values having fallen by -7.4% between October 2010 and May 2012. After 30 months of growth in the 2001 to 2004 growth period, combined capital city home values were 52.1% higher. The combined capital city growth really only tells part of the story though. The capital city housing market isn’t homogenous and growth periods begin and end over different lengths of time. Because Sydney and Melbourne are the largest cities by some way and given our Home Value Index is weighted to reflect that, the capital city results are influenced much more by these two cities than the other capital cities. Given there were no home value falls prior to the growth between 2001 and 2004, if we assume that the growth phase stared in January 2001 we see that the growth ran for varying lengths of time. In fact in most capital cities, home values continued to rise following October 2004 albeit the rate of growth was more moderate than it had previously been. Looking at home value growth across the cities from January 2001 to October 2004 you can see that the rate of growth varied greatly. It is interesting to note that Sydney and Melbourne’s rate of value growth over that period was much more moderate than in all other capital cities except Darwin. Furthermore, the growth in home values commenced much later and ran for longer in most other capital cities. Taking a look at the level of value growth over the current growth phase there are quite a few points of note. Firstly growth has been more moderate than what was recorded over the previous growth phase. Secondly, while Sydney and Melbourne were two of the weaker growth performers previously, they have been the standout performers across the current growth phase. Sydney and Melbourne have been the strongest growth performers, value growth has been moderate elsewhere but particularly weak in Adelaide 3.6% , Hobart 0.0% and Canberra 4.6% . To look at the results another way and by way of direct comparison, we should look at the rate of value growth per month. To determine this I have divided total value growth by the number of months and the results make for some interesting reading. Between January 2001 and October 2004, the rate of monthly growth across the cities was recorded at: 1.3% in Sydney and Melbourne, 2.3% in Brisbane, 2.0% in Adelaide, 1.4% in Perth, 3.0% in Hobart, 0.7% in Darwin and 2.1% in Hobart. Looking to the current growth phase, monthly value rises have been recorded at: 1.1% in Sydney, 0.6% in Melbourne, 0.4% in Brisbane and Darwin, 0.1% in Adelaide, 0.5% in Perth, 0.0% in Hobart and 0.2% in Canberra. Clearly the growth in home values has been more moderate over the most recent growth phase. While growth has been more moderate, so too have the number of homes selling. In both growth phases the number of sales has increased however, in the current market the rise in sales has been much more modest than the rise in 2001-04. Over the period from January 2001 to October 2014 there was a total of 1,402,217 capital city house and unit sales or a monthly average of 30,481. In comparison, over the period from June 2012 to September 2014 there have been 716,908 house and unit sales or a monthly average of 25,604 sales. Monthly sales volumes over the current growth phase have been -16% lower than they were between 2001 and 2004 despite a high rate of population growth and development of new housing stock. Across the individual capital cities the number of monthly sales is lower than over the 2001 to 2004 boom period. In Sydney monthly sales are -14% lower and elsewhere the differentials are recorded at: -8% in Melbourne, -28% in Brisbane, -12% in Adelaide, -16% in Perth, -35% in Hobart, -4% in Darwin and -31% in Canberra. So not only has value growth been slower in each capital city this time around, so too has transaction activity. The lower rate of sales can probably be attributed to the low level of first home buyer participation in the market as well as household savings being much higher than what was recorded between 2001 and 2004. Looking at some of the broader economic conditions suggest some sizeable differences between the 2001-04 boom and current market conditions. At the beginning of 2001 standard variable mortgage rates were recorded at 8.05%. By the end of the year they had fallen to 6.05% which was the low point for the cycle. By the time home value growth began to fall standard variable mortgage rates had climbed to 7.05%. Over the current growth phase, standard variable mortgage rates were 6.85% in June 2012 having fallen from 7.05% the previous months. From that level they have fallen to 5.95% and have been on hold at that level for the past 16 months. Given this for the past 16 months standard variable mortgage rates have been lower than they ever were during the 2001 to 2004 boom. Housing credit advanced by a total of 89.1% over the period from January 2001 to October 2004 at a rate of 1.9% a month. Over that period, investor credit expanded at a rate of 2.4% a month, outpacing the 1.7% monthly expansion in owner occupier credit. Over the current growth period, housing credit has expanded by 13.4% at a rate of 0.5% a month. Over the period, owner occupier credit has risen by 0.4% a month compared to 0.6% a month for investor credit. The rate of credit growth really does only tell part of the story because much more is lent for housing now than it was back in the previous boom so you would expect the growth rate to be lower now. It is important to remember that the cost of housing was also lower at that time so the typical mortgage was much lower than it is today. Finally, because the data looks at credit outstanding, if repayment of that credit is being made at a faster pace it will also impact on these figures. Throughout the 2001 to 2004 boom housing credit expanded at a rate of $6.4 billion a month with owner occupier credit up $4.0 billion a month and investor credit rising $2.4 billion a month. Over the current growth phase, housing credit is expanding at a rate of $5.7 billion a month with owner occupier credit rising $2.9 billion a month compared to a $2.8 billion monthly increase in investor credit. This seems to suggest that housing credit is increasing by only a slightly lower amount currently than it was back in the 2001 to 2004 boom. As mentioned before, the biggest influence on this is likely to be the cost of housing now as opposed to then especially when you consider how much lower sales transactions are currently. Looking at the supply of housing, over the 2001 to 2004 period, an additional 654,253 dwellings were approved for construction at a rate of 14,223 per month. Over the current phase there have been 436,130 dwelling approvals at a rate of 15,039 per month. In the current phase the pipeline of approvals has grown at a faster rate of course, the national population is higher so this is certainly a positive outcome. Unfortunately population growth data is only available each quarter. Each month we do receive overseas arrivals and departures data which correlates strongly with net overseas migration data. The other component of population growth, natural increase, does not have as big of an impact on housing demand as overseas migration. Over the 2001 to 2004 boom period, there were 603,550 net long-term and permanent arrivals to Australia at a rate of 13,121 per month. Over the current growth phase there have been 880,120 net long-term and permanent arrivals to Australia at a rate of 31,433 per month. The data shows that net migration to Australia has been much stronger over the current growth phase compared to the previous phase which creates additional housing demand. Household finance data highlighting selected ratios from the RBA is only available each quarter but is worthwhile to analyse. Between December 2000 and September 2004, the ratio of housing debt to household disposable income increased from 78.8% to 118.0%. Subsequently, household debt to household disposable incomes rose from 95.2% to 137.2% and housing assets to household disposable income rose from 333.4% to 448.3%. From June 2012 to June 2014, housing debt to disposable income rose from 130.4% to 137.7% and household debt to disposable incomes rose from 145.2% to 151.1%. Meanwhile, housing assets to disposable income increased from 393.7% to 433.6%. In summary, the comparison between the 2001 and 2004 growth phase and the current one shows: Growth in home values has been much more moderate over the current phase than in what was recorded over the housing boom of 2001-04 and this is also the case across all capital cities. The 2001 to 2004 growth phase was broad occurring in all capital cities where the current phase is characterised as being quite narrow, focussed mainly on Sydney and Melbourne. Importantly, the growth trend in the previous growth phase started in Melbourne and Sydney before rippling to the other capital cities. Transaction volumes for houses and units have been significantly lower over the current growth phase compared to the previous phase despite a larger population and higher overseas migration . Standard variable mortgage rates have typically been much lower over the current growth phase than they were in 2001 to 2004 with rates consistently at record lows for the past 16 months. The rate of growth in housing credit has been much more moderate over the current growth phase compared to the 2001-04 boom phase. Although the rate of credit growth is slower now than before, so too is the value of housing credit increases albeit the gap between 2001 and 2004 and the current phase is much narrower. On a monthly basis we are currently approving more dwellings for construction than we were in 2001 to 2004. Keep in mind that we are also approving a lot more units than we were in 2001 to 2004 and unit approvals have proven to be less likely to ultimately be constructed than houses. Net long-term and permanent arrivals have been significantly greater over the current growth phase than they were between 2001 and 2004. The 2001 to 2004 boom period coincided with a significant rise in housing and household leverage along with a jump in housing assets. Whilst each of these factors have also increased over the current growth phase the slope of the increase has been much more moderate. Furthermore over the current phase the ratio of housing assets to household income has increased by a greater amount than household and housing debt to disposable income while in 2001 to 2004 it increased at a slower pace. Debate around the sustainability of home value growth over the current growth cycle is healthy and warranted, however some lessons can be learnt from how the housing market performed during an even stronger and longer growth phase over the period from 2001 to 2004. As interest rates rose, housing market exuberance was gradually quelled. Values didn’t plummet, but they did retreat in Sydney and growth rates flattened out in most other cities. Australian households are now more sensitive to the cost of debt, with the ratio of disposable income to household debt at record highs which means the market will probably respond even more swiftly to any perception of interest changes ahead. Importantly we are already seeing the housing market move through the peak rate of growth. The CoreLogic RP Data Home Value Index peaked in April this year and the rolling annual rate of capital gain has been drifting lower since that time. Transaction numbers have also levelled, as has the average selling time of a home, the rate of vendor discounting and growth in housing credit. Our expectations looking forward are that growth rates will continue to drift lower, at least at a macro level due to natural affordability pressures, compressed rental yields and further warnings on speculative investment from the RBA.

Combined capital city dwelling approvals reach an all-time high in October 2014

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released building approvals data for October 2014 on Tuesday of this week. The headline data showed that there were 17,062 total dwelling approvals in October 2014. Total dwelling approvals increased by 11.4% over the month and were 2.5% higher year-on-year. Although there was quite a strong rebound in monthly approvals, they remain -3.7% lower than their recent monthly peak of 17,721 approvals in January 2014. The large increase in dwelling approvals over the month was driven by the much more volatile unit approvals. In October, there were 9,478 houses and 7,584 units approved for construction. House approvals were -0.3% lower over the month while unit approvals were 30.4% higher. Year-on-year, house approval have increased by 12.2% while unit approvals have fallen by -7.4%. As the second chart shows, the six month trend indicates a slowing of dwelling approval numbers. The slowing trend in approvals is much more apparent for units whereas house approvals appear to have reached a plateau. It is also important to remember that a multi-unit development of units is more risky than developing a single house and ultimately less likely to ultimately be constructed. Looking at dwelling approvals across the combined capital cities, there were 14,635 approvals in October which was an all-time high. Capital city dwelling approvals have increased by 18.5% over the month and are 4.5% higher year-on-year. You only have to visit any of the major capital cities to see that there has been a significant surge in construction activity of new homes over recent years. The approvals data indicates that the dwelling construction pipeline in these regions is continuing to grow. One factor that sets apart the capital city market from the national market is the much greater prevalence of unit approvals. In fact, over the past two years there have generally been more capital city units approved each month than houses. In October, there were 7,139 capital city houses and 7,496 capital city units approved for construction. The 7,139 house approvals were the highest number of approvals over any month since November 1999. Monthly unit approvals were at their highest level since October 2013. Over the month, capital city house approvals increased by 6.8% while unit approvals rose 32.4%. Year-on-year, house approvals were up 15.7% while unit approvals are -4.3% lower. Looking at dwelling approvals across the major capital cities, you can see that approvals are higher than they were a year ago in most cities. Dwelling approvals were lower in October 2014 than they were in October 13 in Sydney -1.6% , Darwin -42.3% and Canberra -43.9% . Across the remaining capitals, the year-on-year increase in approvals has been recorded at: 5.3% in Melbourne, 5.6% in Brisbane, 16.3% in Adelaide, 23.4% in Perth and 66.1% in Hobart. In Melbourne and Perth dwelling approvals currently sit at near record highs. House approvals are trending higher across each of the major capital cities. Although the trend is towards more house approvals year-on-year approvals are now lower in Adelaide -17.3% and Darwin -1.6% . Across the remaining cities, the year-on-year increase in house approvals have been recorded at: 28.3% in Sydney, 23.8% in Melbourne, 28.4% in Brisbane, 4.5% in Perth, 26.3% in Hobart and 3.8% in Canberra. Across the major capital cities, the above chart shows that nowadays a much greater number and subsequently proportion of units are being approved for construction. It is interesting to note that unit approvals are trending sharply lower in Sydney lately while elsewhere they continue to trend higher. Also note that for most of the past six years Melbourne has been approving a greater number of units than Sydney. As mentioned earlier the unit data tends to be much more volatile than the house approvals data and is reflected in the year-on-year change in approvals to October 2014. Over the period, the change in approvals across the cities have been recorded at: -15.3% in Sydney, -6.1% in Melbourne, -8.3% in Brisbane, +84.4% in Adelaide, +117.8% in Perth, +520% in Hobart, -52.6% in Darwin and -58.4% in Canberra. If we look over the past 12 months, half of all capital city dwelling approvals were for houses. In fact, the result is only really driven down by the fact that in Adelaide, Perth and Hobart so few units relative to houses have been approved. In each of the remaining capitals more than 50% of approvals have been for units. Units have historically been less likely to ultimately reach completion than houses. Given the high number of unit approvals over the past two years and the fact that home value growth is now slowing you do wonder just how many of these units that are approved will actually be constructed in the current cycle. Dwelling approvals remain at a very high level and with the rate of population growth slowing it is encouraging to see that supply has responded on the back of low interest rates and some rises in buyer demand and home values. As the rate of value growth slows along with sales activity, it will be interesting to see how much of this stock which is approved will commence and ultimately make it to completion. Furthermore, we know that much of the unit stock which is now so prevalent in inner city areas is being purchased by investors. With capital growth slowing and rental growth slow this may also impact on some of the future construction of these approved units. The Reserve Bank has also flagged that they, along with banking regulators, are looking to curb higher risk lending to investors. We don’t yet know what these curbs may be but once implemented they may act as a further deterrent to investors and put into jeopardy some of these inner city unit approvals coming to fruition.

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 7 December, 2014

There are 1,570 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,535 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions will be found in Mount Waverley where there are 26 expected. The November CoreLogic RP Data November Home Value Index showed that house values fell by 2.8 per cent and unit values fell by 1.5 per cent. The market in Melbourne clearly slowed in November as volumes rose and the clearance rate dropped resulting in a reduction in property values. Over the year the Melbourne property market has showed healthy growth. With one month left in 2014 house values have risen by 6.5 per cent and units by 1.6 per cent. Viewed in conjunction with what has been a small rise in transactions compared to last year these results show a moderate and not booming market. The clearance rate for November was 66.8 per cent and there were 5,722 auctions held with 3,819 selling. This is lower than the 68.2 per cent recorded last year Volumes look set to remain high until the end of the year and this will be welcomed by buyers, especially as the clearance rate has been edging lower. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale rose from 31 to 32 days over the last week and vendor discounting eased slightly to -4.9 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 30 November: 63 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 7 December: 1,570 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 30 November: 32 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 30 November: -4.9 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.5 per cent higher in month ending 30 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Capital cities record a clearance rate of 66.6% from the weekend

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 30 November 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 66.6 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 65.7 per cent last week and 66.9 per cent this time last year. Conditions for buyers at auction are improving as we get closer to Christmas with volumes remaining at historical highs and demand easing, particularly in Melbourne. In Sydney auction volumes are very high and the number of active buyers seem to be rising in line with supply. A preliminary clearance rate of 75.2 per cent recorded compared to 71.8 per cent last week and 72.7 per cent last year. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 63.7 per cent was recorded compared to 66.1 per cent last week and 67.9 per cent this time last year. The state election has had no impact on results that are on trend with the mild easing in demand seen over November. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 45.9 per cent was recorded compared to 43.3 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded an above trend clearance rate of 66.7 per cent compared to 61.2 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 63.3 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 21.7 per cent was recorded. In Tasmania 8 auction sales were recorded and no homes were passed in. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Where owners are queuing to sell in Melbourne

The residential property market differs from suburb to suburb in many different ways. Some suburbs are tightly held, some are in high demand from buyers and in others, sellers are seeking to capitalise on improved local conditions. It is in these suburbs that CoreLogic RP Data has recorded a substantial increase in the number of houses listed for sale compared to a year ago. In undertaking this analysis only those suburbs within a 30 km of the CBD have been considered as outside of this, development suburbs become more prevalent and that affects the outcome. In those suburbs the high rate of listings is a factor of developers’ centralised decision-making as opposed to the individual decisions of 100’s of owners. The suburb where owners have been seemingly queuing up to sell is Doncaster. Compared to a year ago there has been a 41 per cent rise in listings. Over the same time the median sale price has grown by 15.5 per cent, well in excess of the citywide 9.7 per cent. This suggests that sellers have been motivated by high buyer demand. Second on the list is Heidelberg Heights with a 33.3 per cent rise in listings. Not unlike Doncaster, sellers have been rewarded for their decision with the median sale price rising by 14 per cent. Third on the list is Burwood East where those seeking to sell have increased by 30.9 per cent. It is followed by Sunshine, Forest Hill, Preston, Parkdale, Vermont South, Glen Iris and Altona North. The common factor in each case is an above average rise in the median selling price. Now of course there are exceptions to this, for instance Bayswater has seen a 17 per cent fall in listings and 11.5 per cent rise in the median selling price but the in the majority of circumstances strong local markets encourage owners to sell. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Four more weekends of auctions until Christmas

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 30 November 2014 There are 3,977 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 3,351 auctions expected, compared to 3,472 for the same period last year. So far this month the auction clearance rate for capital cities has dropped from 68.2 per cent in October to 66.5 per cent and this is largely due to the Melbourne market. Unlike the horse racing or AFL the state election this Saturday has had no impact on volumes. There are 1,426 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,433 last week and 1,598 this time last year. With one weekend remaining this month the November clearance rate is 67.5 per cent, down from 70.5 per cent in October. In Sydney, CoreLogic RP Data is expecting 1,374 auctions compared to 1,337 last week and 1,402 for this week last year. In line with the national trend the clearance rate has also softened in Sydney. The reduction is minor, from 73.8 to 72.1 per cent. In Brisbane 254 auctions are expected after 219 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 154 auctions, compared to 147 last week. Canberra has 80 auctions scheduled compared to 97 last week. The auction market appears to be strengthening with the clearance rate so far in November up to 59 per cent from 47.4 per cent in October. Perth has 55 auctions compared to 55 last week There are 10 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Reservoir VIC and Richmond Vic each of which has 23 expected. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 30 November 2014

There are 1,426 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,598 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions will be in Reservoir and Richmond, each are expecting 23 auctions. The state election may be on this Saturday but it does not have a significant affect on the market, buyers are able to vote and bid with ease as polling places are open from 8am to 6pm. With only four weeks to go for auctions this year one of the features of the year – more auctions – is clearly apparent. So far this year there have been more homes sold at auction, 26,402, than there was over the whole of 2013. In 2013 there were 25,350 home sold at auction. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was stable at a very low 31 days over the last week and vendor discounting eased slightly to -4.8 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 23 November: 66.1 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 30 November: 1,426 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 23 November: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 23 November: -4.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.5 per cent higher in month ending 23 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

National clearance rate of 67.7% recorded over the weekend

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 23 November 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 67.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 68.5 per cent last week and 65.4 per cent this time last year. There are 4 weeks left for auctions this year and there have been 26.5 per cent more auctions than last year with 88,402 auctions compared to 66,908 at the same stage last year. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 74.3 per cent recorded compared to 73.1 per cent last week and 74 per cent last year. With just 4 weeks for auction remaining this year there have already been over 4,000 more homes sold at auction than for the whole of last year. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 64.9 per cent was recorded on the 19th week with over 1,000 auctions this year. This compares to 68.9 per cent last week and 65.1 per cent this time last year. Below trend results continue to be recorded as high auction volumes are a weekly feature of the market. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 52.2 per cent was recorded compared to 45.8 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded an above trend clearance rate of 64.3 per cent compared to 55.4 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 69.8 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 66.7 per cent was recorded. In Tasmania 3 auction sales were recorded and 8 homes were passed in. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

APRA data shows investment lending continues to outpace growth on owner occupier loans

The Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA released their quarterly Authorised Deposit-taking Institution ADI Property Exposures data for September 2014 earlier today. The data always provides a valuable insight into current and historic mortgage lending by domestic ADIs and this quarter’s release was no different. Based on the value of all outstanding mortgages by households to Australian ADI’s, there was $825.0 billion outstanding to owner occupiers 66.0% of all housing loans at the end of September 2014 and $425.4 billion to investors 34.0% . Over the 12 months to September 2014, the total value of outstanding mortgages to owner occupiers has increased by 7.6% compared to an 11.9% rise in outstanding credit to investors. This represents the greatest annual increase in owner occupier lending since June 2012 and the greatest rise in investor lending since December 2010. Much like other data received more regularly, the chart indicates that there is significantly more momentum in the investor lending space than that for owner occupiers where growth is more moderate. At the end of September 2014, a record high 36.8% of loans outstanding had an offset facility, up from 34.2% a year earlier. Also a record high was the 36.8% of all outstanding mortgages which were interest-only, up from 34.6% a year earlier. Just 0.2% of all outstanding mortgages were reverse mortgages and 2.7% were low documentation which was down from 3.6% a year earlier and at a record low proportion. Other non-standard loans accounted for just 0.1% of all outstanding mortgages. It seems that more and more mortgagees are accessing offset accounts in order to reduce the interest payable on their mortgages and maximise repayments of the principal while interest rates are so low. The data also indicates that a high proportion of lenders are accessing interest-only mortgages which seems somewhat counterintuitive at a time when interest rates are so low. The average balance on all outstanding mortgages at the end of September 2014 was $238,700. The average balance has increased by 3.0% over the past year. Loans with an offset facility $284,600 and interest-only mortgages $308,400 have much higher average outstanding loan balances. It is interesting to note that the annual growth in average outstanding loan balances has been much more moderate for mortgages with an offset and interest-only mortgages at 2.0% and 2.1% respectively. Encouragingly, the data also indicates that outstanding balances are reducing for low documentation and other non-standard loans as they become less common. Over the past year the average balance has fallen by -3.1% for low-documentation loans and by -6.5% for other non-standard loans. With mortgage rates low and fewer of these loan types being written it seems those that have these types of loans are continuing to pay down these mortgages. Turning the focus to new loans written over the September quarter, 62.6% of the total value of new lending was to owner occupiers and 37.4% was to investors. The proportion of new lending to investors has fallen from a record high of 37.9% in the June 2014 quarter. Based on this data it suggests that growth in demand for both owner occupier and investment lending may have peaked. Although after having trended lower over the previous two quarters, the annual change in new owner occupier and investment lending bounced in September, recorded at 6.9% and 21.4% respectively. Over the September 2014 quarter, 0.7% of new loans approved were low-documentation, 42.5% were interest-only, 0.1% were other non-standard loans, 43.2% were third party originated loans and 3.5% were loans approved outside of serviceability. The 42.5% of new loans which were interest only was down from a record high of 44.0% over the previous quarter. The data also seems to reflect the slowing of growth in investment demand, remember that interest only loans tend to be but not always reflective of lending for investment purposes. The ADIs seem to be increasing the usage of their broker channels with the 43.2% of loans originated by third parties the highest proportion since June 2008. With 3.5% of new mortgages approved outside of serviceability over the September 2014 quarter, this was down from a record high 3.7% over the previous quarter. Looking at the loan to value ratios LVR of loans written over the September 2014 quarter, 25.2% of new loans had an LVR of less than 60%, 41.8% of loans had an LVR of between 60% and 80%, 20.9% had an LVR of between 80% and 90% and 12.1% had an LVR of 90% or more. The 12.5% of new loans with an LVR of more than 90% is the lowest proportion since June 2011. The 25.2% of mortgages with an LVR lower than 60% was the highest proportion in a year. This falling proportion of loans above 90% LVR suggests there are proportionally less high-risk mortgages being written. The data indicates that overall interest-only lending is continuing to rise however, new lending of this type has eased of late. Investment lending remains high and continues to ramp-up however, the rate of growth in new lending to investors does appear to have slowed. Keep in mind that the December data will probably tell us much more given it encapsulates more of the spring selling season. Furthermore, after the RBA flagged that they and other regulators are looking at ways to cool investor exuberance with an announcement expected in December we may actually see a run on investor lending over the coming quarter. It is of course important to remember that although investment lending has ramped up sharply over the past year, there is little to suggest that lending to investors is more risky than lending to owner occupiers. Bill Evans provided some insight into Westpac’s investment lending late last week. He noted: Compared to owner–occupier applicants, investment applicants are older 75% over 35 years ; have higher incomes and higher credit scores. 65% of investment loan customers are ahead on their repayments and 90+ days delinquencies are 0.37% compared to 0.47% for the full housing portfolio. Westpac has an interest rate buffer approach to lending linking loan approvals to serviceability at a rate at least 180 basis points above the standard mortgage rate 5% . All investment loans are full recourse and specific policies apply to holiday apartments and single industry towns. Our concern about the high level of investment lending remains over the fact that investors are targeting the residential property asset class because of its superior returns. While these returns remain superior demand is likely to persist. The concern then arises when other investment classes start to show superior returns will these owners exit the residential property class or remain in it for the long-term? As the above chart shows, investor activity is heavily concentrated within the capital city inner-city unit market. Were many investors to exit the market at a similar time in search of superior returns that could have some serious repercussions for the inner city unit market and potentially the wider housing market too.

Strength of the auction market eases as end of year approaches

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 23 November 2014 There are 3,240 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,700 auctions expected, compared to 2,716 for the same period last year. The strength of the auction market has clearly eased over the past two months with the national clearance rate remaining in the 60’s. The softer clearance rate needs to be viewed in the context of volumes, as this is the third consecutive week with over a 1,000 auctions in both Sydney and Melbourne. The clearance rate over the past few weeks has provided further confirmation that the Melbourne market is healthy but not booming. There are 1,187 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,504 last week and 1,172 this time last year. This is the 19th week with more than 1,000 auctions this year. In Sydney, CoreLogic RP Data is expecting 1,036 auctions compared to 1,417 last week and 1,060 for this week last year. This is the 11th week with more than 1,000 auctions this year, well in excess when compared to 2013 where there were just 7 weeks in which over 1,000 auctions took place across the city. The highest volume of auctions is again in Mosman with 22 expected followed by 18 in Randwick. In Brisbane 200 auctions are expected after 142 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 132 auctions, compared to 152 last week. Canberra has 87 auctions scheduled compared to 78 last week. Perth has 49 auctions compared to 57 last week There are 22 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Reservoir VIC which has 24 expected. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist

CoreLogic RP Data Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 23 November, 2014

There are 1,187 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,172 for the same time last year. The most auctions are expected in Reservoir with 24 expected followed by 23 in both Bentleigh East and Glen Waverley. The clearance rate over the past few weeks has provided further confirmation that the market is healthy but not booming. This is also obvious when the home values are both corrected for inflation and then compared to the previous peaks. At the end of September house values in Melbourne were 3 per cent below their peak in real terms and units 5.4 per cent lower. In many parts of Melbourne buyers have better purchasing power than they did in 2010. Clearance rates may have dropped but the private sale market continues to tighten. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was stable at a very low 31 days over the last week and vendor discounting dropped to -4.7 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 16 November: 68.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 23 November: 1,187 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 16 November: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 16 November: -4.7 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.3 per cent higher in month ending 16 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Why the economy desperately needs more than just a housing market recovery

According to the CoreLogic RP Data Home Value Index results in October 2014, combined capital city home values have increased by 8.9% over the past year. The rate of growth is now decelerating after reaching a peak annual growth rate of 11.5% in April 2014. The two cities which have been the real driver of value growth, Sydney and Melbourne, are also now seeing the rate of value growth slowing. The RBA has previously stated that as the economy transitions away from mining investment that it was specifically looking for a pick-up in residential property. To date there has been a pick-up, in buyer demand, as well as home values and dwelling construction however, with value growth having peaked and dwelling approvals now -15% lower than their recent monthly peak will the pick-up in the residential segment of the economy be enough to offset mining? It is beginning to look increasingly unlikely. As we have showed, the residential housing sector is still quite strong but is slowing from its peak. Although approvals have dropped there remains a strong pipeline of housing construction which should continue over the coming years however, the spike in construction could be somewhat short-lived overall. If we look at the other sectors of the economy, economic data appears to be increasingly turning more negative than positive. According to Westpac and the Melbourne Institute, consumer sentiment has been mired in higher levels of pessimism than optimism for the past nine months. The last time pessimism had outweighed optimism for this long was in the middle of the financial crisis. Last week we learned that wage growth remains benign. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS the wage price index has increased by just 2.6% over the year to September 2014. With inflation recorded at 2.3% there is very little real growth in wages at the moment. With wage growth so low, we are also seeing the highest unemployment rate the country has seen in more than decade. According to ABS data, the unemployment rate was recorded at 6.2% in October and sits at a level not seen since early 2003. If employees can’t negotiate a decent pay rise it is not as if businesses are actively seeking employees. Commodities, which were previously a key driver of the Australian economy have seen prices drop significantly over the past year. According to the Reserve Bank’s RBA monthly index of commodity prices, Australian commodity prices are -16.9% lower over the past year and -38% lower than their July 2011 peak. Earlier this year Australia had recorded international trade surpluses for three consecutive months. The monthly trade surplus reached as much $1.4 trillion however, in September the trade deficit had sunk to $2.3 trillion. This $2.3 trillion figure was the largest monthly trade deficit since November 2012. According to the National Australia Bank, business conditions have improved sharply. Their index of business conditions rose by an all-time high 12 points in October to reach its highest level since February 2008. Although business conditions may be up, confidence across the business sector continues to fall. In October business confidence fell by a point to its lowest level since August of last year. Retail trade recorded a somewhat surprising bounce of 1.2% in September. Although this was the strongest monthly increase since February last year it comes following relatively light increases of 0.7%, 0.4% and 0.1% over the previous three months. One wonders if it is an outlier. In fact Westpac and the Melbourne Institute asked respondents to their consumer sentiment survey about their spending intentions this Christmas. The survey results indicated that 38% of respondents were going to spend less and 50% were going to spend the same. Westpac reported that the net balance more minus less of -26% was the worst since 2008 in the middle of the financial crisis. The latest read on population growth shows that population growth is slowing. Although growth in the number of new Australians remains strong, population growth over the year to March 2014 was at its lowest level since the year to June 2012. Furthermore, the more up-to-date overseas arrivals and departures shows that net long-term and permanent arrivals over the 12 months to September 2014 were at their lowest level since the 12 months to October 2011. This data would indicate a further slowing of net overseas migration, particularly within the mining states where the slowdown in both overseas and interstate migration has been the most substantial. The strong rate of population growth has been a significant driver of gross domestic product. Over the 12 months to June 2014, the Australian economy grew by a quite healthy 3.1%. Although this headline figure is quite good, on a per capita basis the economy grew by a much lower 1.6%. With population growth slowing we would expect GDP per capital to also slow. While there are a lot of negatives here one of the positives recently has been the declining Australian dollar. At the end of October 2014 the exchange rate with the $US was 88 cents which is much lower than it has been of late. A lower Australian dollar should help our manufacturers, exporters and tourism however, that will take a while to flow through. With the housing market and housing approvals seemingly topping out we need some other industries to help with the heavy lifting as commodity prices remain low and the pipeline of larger infrastructure projects related to the resources sector continue to taper away. We aren’t sure who or what these industries are but a further devaluation of the Australian dollar would certainly help some of the prime candidates such as tourism, manufacturing and education for overseas students. The Reserve Bank has stated that monetary policy has largely done all it can to assist and now it’s up to the Government to manage fiscal policy in such a way that can assist the transitioning economy. In my mind this can’t come quick enough because the economy is softening and the housing market needs help to manage this transistion.

Is there an oversupply in Melbourne?

The question of supply levels is a vexed one, after all a high level of supply can be great for buyers as it can dampen price growth, but as most buyers are sellers too it is not that simple. The question is also hard to comprehensively answer, as there are a wide range of data sets and stages in the development cycle to compare. At a citywide level the volume of homes on the market at any given time is a good measure. In the month ending on the 9th of November there were 4.5 per cent more homes newly listed for sale and 6.6 per cent fewer overall homes for sale in Melbourne. Given values have been rising that suggests that there is not oversupply of homes for sale, buyers are buying the new homes and the older stock is also reducing. But what of the unit market? A casual glance at the Melbourne skyline shows a lot of new high rise residential towers being constructed. Our data shows that those units are finding buyers. The number of units listed for sale is marginally, 2.4 per cent lower than a year ago, and the overall number of units on the market is 3.3 per cent higher. That suggests that the supply is exceeding demand to a greater extent than is the case in the houses market. That is not necessarily a bad thing. Over the past decade the state government’s policies to address housing affordability concerns have been centred on increased supply in the inner city unit market and outer suburbs. The data shows that it is working. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist This was originally published on www.propertyobserver.com.au

Capital cities record a clearance rate of 66.6% from the weekend

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 30 November 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 66.6 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 65.7 per cent last week and 66.9 per cent this time last year. Conditions for buyers at auction are improving as we get closer to Christmas with volumes remaining at historical highs and demand easing, particularly in Melbourne. In Sydney auction volumes are very high and the number of active buyers seem to be rising in line with supply. A preliminary clearance rate of 75.2 per cent recorded compared to 71.8 per cent last week and 72.7 per cent last year. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 63.7 per cent was recorded compared to 66.1 per cent last week and 67.9 per cent this time last year. The state election has had no impact on results that are on trend with the mild easing in demand seen over November. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 45.9 per cent was recorded compared to 43.3 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded an above trend clearance rate of 66.7 per cent compared to 61.2 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 63.3 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 21.7 per cent was recorded. In Tasmania 8 auction sales were recorded and no homes were passed in. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Where owners are queuing to sell in Melbourne

The residential property market differs from suburb to suburb in many different ways. Some suburbs are tightly held, some are in high demand from buyers and in others, sellers are seeking to capitalise on improved local conditions. It is in these suburbs that CoreLogic RP Data has recorded a substantial increase in the number of houses listed for sale compared to a year ago. In undertaking this analysis only those suburbs within a 30 km of the CBD have been considered as outside of this, development suburbs become more prevalent and that affects the outcome. In those suburbs the high rate of listings is a factor of developers’ centralised decision-making as opposed to the individual decisions of 100’s of owners. The suburb where owners have been seemingly queuing up to sell is Doncaster. Compared to a year ago there has been a 41 per cent rise in listings. Over the same time the median sale price has grown by 15.5 per cent, well in excess of the citywide 9.7 per cent. This suggests that sellers have been motivated by high buyer demand. Second on the list is Heidelberg Heights with a 33.3 per cent rise in listings. Not unlike Doncaster, sellers have been rewarded for their decision with the median sale price rising by 14 per cent. Third on the list is Burwood East where those seeking to sell have increased by 30.9 per cent. It is followed by Sunshine, Forest Hill, Preston, Parkdale, Vermont South, Glen Iris and Altona North. The common factor in each case is an above average rise in the median selling price. Now of course there are exceptions to this, for instance Bayswater has seen a 17 per cent fall in listings and 11.5 per cent rise in the median selling price but the in the majority of circumstances strong local markets encourage owners to sell. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Four more weekends of auctions until Christmas

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 30 November 2014 There are 3,977 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 3,351 auctions expected, compared to 3,472 for the same period last year. So far this month the auction clearance rate for capital cities has dropped from 68.2 per cent in October to 66.5 per cent and this is largely due to the Melbourne market. Unlike the horse racing or AFL the state election this Saturday has had no impact on volumes. There are 1,426 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,433 last week and 1,598 this time last year. With one weekend remaining this month the November clearance rate is 67.5 per cent, down from 70.5 per cent in October. In Sydney, CoreLogic RP Data is expecting 1,374 auctions compared to 1,337 last week and 1,402 for this week last year. In line with the national trend the clearance rate has also softened in Sydney. The reduction is minor, from 73.8 to 72.1 per cent. In Brisbane 254 auctions are expected after 219 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 154 auctions, compared to 147 last week. Canberra has 80 auctions scheduled compared to 97 last week. The auction market appears to be strengthening with the clearance rate so far in November up to 59 per cent from 47.4 per cent in October. Perth has 55 auctions compared to 55 last week There are 10 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Reservoir VIC and Richmond Vic each of which has 23 expected. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 30 November 2014

There are 1,426 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,598 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions will be in Reservoir and Richmond, each are expecting 23 auctions. The state election may be on this Saturday but it does not have a significant affect on the market, buyers are able to vote and bid with ease as polling places are open from 8am to 6pm. With only four weeks to go for auctions this year one of the features of the year – more auctions – is clearly apparent. So far this year there have been more homes sold at auction, 26,402, than there was over the whole of 2013. In 2013 there were 25,350 home sold at auction. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was stable at a very low 31 days over the last week and vendor discounting eased slightly to -4.8 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 23 November: 66.1 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 30 November: 1,426 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 23 November: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 23 November: -4.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.5 per cent higher in month ending 23 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

National clearance rate of 67.7% recorded over the weekend

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 23 November 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 67.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 68.5 per cent last week and 65.4 per cent this time last year. There are 4 weeks left for auctions this year and there have been 26.5 per cent more auctions than last year with 88,402 auctions compared to 66,908 at the same stage last year. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 74.3 per cent recorded compared to 73.1 per cent last week and 74 per cent last year. With just 4 weeks for auction remaining this year there have already been over 4,000 more homes sold at auction than for the whole of last year. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 64.9 per cent was recorded on the 19th week with over 1,000 auctions this year. This compares to 68.9 per cent last week and 65.1 per cent this time last year. Below trend results continue to be recorded as high auction volumes are a weekly feature of the market. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 52.2 per cent was recorded compared to 45.8 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded an above trend clearance rate of 64.3 per cent compared to 55.4 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 69.8 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 66.7 per cent was recorded. In Tasmania 3 auction sales were recorded and 8 homes were passed in. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Housing Market Specialist

APRA data shows investment lending continues to outpace growth on owner occupier loans

The Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA released their quarterly Authorised Deposit-taking Institution ADI Property Exposures data for September 2014 earlier today. The data always provides a valuable insight into current and historic mortgage lending by domestic ADIs and this quarter’s release was no different. Based on the value of all outstanding mortgages by households to Australian ADI’s, there was $825.0 billion outstanding to owner occupiers 66.0% of all housing loans at the end of September 2014 and $425.4 billion to investors 34.0% . Over the 12 months to September 2014, the total value of outstanding mortgages to owner occupiers has increased by 7.6% compared to an 11.9% rise in outstanding credit to investors. This represents the greatest annual increase in owner occupier lending since June 2012 and the greatest rise in investor lending since December 2010. Much like other data received more regularly, the chart indicates that there is significantly more momentum in the investor lending space than that for owner occupiers where growth is more moderate. At the end of September 2014, a record high 36.8% of loans outstanding had an offset facility, up from 34.2% a year earlier. Also a record high was the 36.8% of all outstanding mortgages which were interest-only, up from 34.6% a year earlier. Just 0.2% of all outstanding mortgages were reverse mortgages and 2.7% were low documentation which was down from 3.6% a year earlier and at a record low proportion. Other non-standard loans accounted for just 0.1% of all outstanding mortgages. It seems that more and more mortgagees are accessing offset accounts in order to reduce the interest payable on their mortgages and maximise repayments of the principal while interest rates are so low. The data also indicates that a high proportion of lenders are accessing interest-only mortgages which seems somewhat counterintuitive at a time when interest rates are so low. The average balance on all outstanding mortgages at the end of September 2014 was $238,700. The average balance has increased by 3.0% over the past year. Loans with an offset facility $284,600 and interest-only mortgages $308,400 have much higher average outstanding loan balances. It is interesting to note that the annual growth in average outstanding loan balances has been much more moderate for mortgages with an offset and interest-only mortgages at 2.0% and 2.1% respectively. Encouragingly, the data also indicates that outstanding balances are reducing for low documentation and other non-standard loans as they become less common. Over the past year the average balance has fallen by -3.1% for low-documentation loans and by -6.5% for other non-standard loans. With mortgage rates low and fewer of these loan types being written it seems those that have these types of loans are continuing to pay down these mortgages. Turning the focus to new loans written over the September quarter, 62.6% of the total value of new lending was to owner occupiers and 37.4% was to investors. The proportion of new lending to investors has fallen from a record high of 37.9% in the June 2014 quarter. Based on this data it suggests that growth in demand for both owner occupier and investment lending may have peaked. Although after having trended lower over the previous two quarters, the annual change in new owner occupier and investment lending bounced in September, recorded at 6.9% and 21.4% respectively. Over the September 2014 quarter, 0.7% of new loans approved were low-documentation, 42.5% were interest-only, 0.1% were other non-standard loans, 43.2% were third party originated loans and 3.5% were loans approved outside of serviceability. The 42.5% of new loans which were interest only was down from a record high of 44.0% over the previous quarter. The data also seems to reflect the slowing of growth in investment demand, remember that interest only loans tend to be but not always reflective of lending for investment purposes. The ADIs seem to be increasing the usage of their broker channels with the 43.2% of loans originated by third parties the highest proportion since June 2008. With 3.5% of new mortgages approved outside of serviceability over the September 2014 quarter, this was down from a record high 3.7% over the previous quarter. Looking at the loan to value ratios LVR of loans written over the September 2014 quarter, 25.2% of new loans had an LVR of less than 60%, 41.8% of loans had an LVR of between 60% and 80%, 20.9% had an LVR of between 80% and 90% and 12.1% had an LVR of 90% or more. The 12.5% of new loans with an LVR of more than 90% is the lowest proportion since June 2011. The 25.2% of mortgages with an LVR lower than 60% was the highest proportion in a year. This falling proportion of loans above 90% LVR suggests there are proportionally less high-risk mortgages being written. The data indicates that overall interest-only lending is continuing to rise however, new lending of this type has eased of late. Investment lending remains high and continues to ramp-up however, the rate of growth in new lending to investors does appear to have slowed. Keep in mind that the December data will probably tell us much more given it encapsulates more of the spring selling season. Furthermore, after the RBA flagged that they and other regulators are looking at ways to cool investor exuberance with an announcement expected in December we may actually see a run on investor lending over the coming quarter. It is of course important to remember that although investment lending has ramped up sharply over the past year, there is little to suggest that lending to investors is more risky than lending to owner occupiers. Bill Evans provided some insight into Westpac’s investment lending late last week. He noted: Compared to owner–occupier applicants, investment applicants are older 75% over 35 years ; have higher incomes and higher credit scores. 65% of investment loan customers are ahead on their repayments and 90+ days delinquencies are 0.37% compared to 0.47% for the full housing portfolio. Westpac has an interest rate buffer approach to lending linking loan approvals to serviceability at a rate at least 180 basis points above the standard mortgage rate 5% . All investment loans are full recourse and specific policies apply to holiday apartments and single industry towns. Our concern about the high level of investment lending remains over the fact that investors are targeting the residential property asset class because of its superior returns. While these returns remain superior demand is likely to persist. The concern then arises when other investment classes start to show superior returns will these owners exit the residential property class or remain in it for the long-term? As the above chart shows, investor activity is heavily concentrated within the capital city inner-city unit market. Were many investors to exit the market at a similar time in search of superior returns that could have some serious repercussions for the inner city unit market and potentially the wider housing market too.

Strength of the auction market eases as end of year approaches

CoreLogic RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 23 November 2014 There are 3,240 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,700 auctions expected, compared to 2,716 for the same period last year. The strength of the auction market has clearly eased over the past two months with the national clearance rate remaining in the 60’s. The softer clearance rate needs to be viewed in the context of volumes, as this is the third consecutive week with over a 1,000 auctions in both Sydney and Melbourne. The clearance rate over the past few weeks has provided further confirmation that the Melbourne market is healthy but not booming. There are 1,187 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,504 last week and 1,172 this time last year. This is the 19th week with more than 1,000 auctions this year. In Sydney, CoreLogic RP Data is expecting 1,036 auctions compared to 1,417 last week and 1,060 for this week last year. This is the 11th week with more than 1,000 auctions this year, well in excess when compared to 2013 where there were just 7 weeks in which over 1,000 auctions took place across the city. The highest volume of auctions is again in Mosman with 22 expected followed by 18 in Randwick. In Brisbane 200 auctions are expected after 142 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 132 auctions, compared to 152 last week. Canberra has 87 auctions scheduled compared to 78 last week. Perth has 49 auctions compared to 57 last week There are 22 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Reservoir VIC which has 24 expected. Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Auction Market Specialist

CoreLogic RP Data Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 23 November, 2014

There are 1,187 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,172 for the same time last year. The most auctions are expected in Reservoir with 24 expected followed by 23 in both Bentleigh East and Glen Waverley. The clearance rate over the past few weeks has provided further confirmation that the market is healthy but not booming. This is also obvious when the home values are both corrected for inflation and then compared to the previous peaks. At the end of September house values in Melbourne were 3 per cent below their peak in real terms and units 5.4 per cent lower. In many parts of Melbourne buyers have better purchasing power than they did in 2010. Clearance rates may have dropped but the private sale market continues to tighten. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was stable at a very low 31 days over the last week and vendor discounting dropped to -4.7 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 16 November: 68.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 23 November: 1,187 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 16 November: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 16 November: -4.7 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.3 per cent higher in month ending 16 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

CoreLogic RP Data Melbourne Auction Market preview; Week ending 23 November, 2014

There are 1,187 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,172 for the same time last year. The most auctions are expected in Reservoir with 24 expected followed by 23 in both Bentleigh East and Glen Waverley. The clearance rate over the past few weeks has provided further confirmation that the market is healthy but not booming. This is also obvious when the home values are both corrected for inflation and then compared to the previous peaks. At the end of September house values in Melbourne were 3 per cent below their peak in real terms and units 5.4 per cent lower. In many parts of Melbourne buyers have better purchasing power than they did in 2010. Clearance rates may have dropped but the private sale market continues to tighten. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was stable at a very low 31 days over the last week and vendor discounting dropped to -4.7 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 16 November: 68.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 23 November: 1,187 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 16 November: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 16 November: -4.7 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.3 per cent higher in month ending 16 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca CoreLogic RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Why the economy desperately needs more than just a housing market recovery

According to the CoreLogic RP Data Home Value Index results in October 2014, combined capital city home values have increased by 8.9% over the past year. The rate of growth is now decelerating after reaching a peak annual growth rate of 11.5% in April 2014. The two cities which have been the real driver of value growth, Sydney and Melbourne, are also now seeing the rate of value growth slowing. The RBA has previously stated that as the economy transitions away from mining investment that it was specifically looking for a pick-up in residential property. To date there has been a pick-up, in buyer demand, as well as home values and dwelling construction however, with value growth having peaked and dwelling approvals now -15% lower than their recent monthly peak will the pick-up in the residential segment of the economy be enough to offset mining? It is beginning to look increasingly unlikely. As we have showed, the residential housing sector is still quite strong but is slowing from its peak. Although approvals have dropped there remains a strong pipeline of housing construction which should continue over the coming years however, the spike in construction could be somewhat short-lived overall. If we look at the other sectors of the economy, economic data appears to be increasingly turning more negative than positive. According to Westpac and the Melbourne Institute, consumer sentiment has been mired in higher levels of pessimism than optimism for the past nine months. The last time pessimism had outweighed optimism for this long was in the middle of the financial crisis. Last week we learned that wage growth remains benign. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS the wage price index has increased by just 2.6% over the year to September 2014. With inflation recorded at 2.3% there is very little real growth in wages at the moment. With wage growth so low, we are also seeing the highest unemployment rate the country has seen in more than decade. According to ABS data, the unemployment rate was recorded at 6.2% in October and sits at a level not seen since early 2003. If employees can’t negotiate a decent pay rise it is not as if businesses are actively seeking employees. Commodities, which were previously a key driver of the Australian economy have seen prices drop significantly over the past year. According to the Reserve Bank’s RBA monthly index of commodity prices, Australian commodity prices are -16.9% lower over the past year and -38% lower than their July 2011 peak. Earlier this year Australia had recorded international trade surpluses for three consecutive months. The monthly trade surplus reached as much $1.4 trillion however, in September the trade deficit had sunk to $2.3 trillion. This $2.3 trillion figure was the largest monthly trade deficit since November 2012. According to the National Australia Bank, business conditions have improved sharply. Their index of business conditions rose by an all-time high 12 points in October to reach its highest level since February 2008. Although business conditions may be up, confidence across the business sector continues to fall. In October business confidence fell by a point to its lowest level since August of last year. Retail trade recorded a somewhat surprising bounce of 1.2% in September. Although this was the strongest monthly increase since February last year it comes following relatively light increases of 0.7%, 0.4% and 0.1% over the previous three months. One wonders if it is an outlier. In fact Westpac and the Melbourne Institute asked respondents to their consumer sentiment survey about their spending intentions this Christmas. The survey results indicated that 38% of respondents were going to spend less and 50% were going to spend the same. Westpac reported that the net balance more minus less of -26% was the worst since 2008 in the middle of the financial crisis. The latest read on population growth shows that population growth is slowing. Although growth in the number of new Australians remains strong, population growth over the year to March 2014 was at its lowest level since the year to June 2012. Furthermore, the more up-to-date overseas arrivals and departures shows that net long-term and permanent arrivals over the 12 months to September 2014 were at their lowest level since the 12 months to October 2011. This data would indicate a further slowing of net overseas migration, particularly within the mining states where the slowdown in both overseas and interstate migration has been the most substantial. The strong rate of population growth has been a significant driver of gross domestic product. Over the 12 months to June 2014, the Australian economy grew by a quite healthy 3.1%. Although this headline figure is quite good, on a per capita basis the economy grew by a much lower 1.6%. With population growth slowing we would expect GDP per capital to also slow. While there are a lot of negatives here one of the positives recently has been the declining Australian dollar. At the end of October 2014 the exchange rate with the $US was 88 cents which is much lower than it has been of late. A lower Australian dollar should help our manufacturers, exporters and tourism however, that will take a while to flow through. With the housing market and housing approvals seemingly topping out we need some other industries to help with the heavy lifting as commodity prices remain low and the pipeline of larger infrastructure projects related to the resources sector continue to taper away. We aren’t sure who or what these industries are but a further devaluation of the Australian dollar would certainly help some of the prime candidates such as tourism, manufacturing and education for overseas students. The Reserve Bank has stated that monetary policy has largely done all it can to assist and now it’s up to the Government to manage fiscal policy in such a way that can assist the transitioning economy. In my mind this can’t come quick enough because the economy is softening and the housing market needs help to manage this transistion.

Is there an oversupply in Melbourne?

The question of supply levels is a vexed one, after all a high level of supply can be great for buyers as it can dampen price growth, but as most buyers are sellers too it is not that simple. The question is also hard to comprehensively answer, as there are a wide range of data sets and stages in the development cycle to compare. At a citywide level the volume of homes on the market at any given time is a good measure. In the month ending on the 9th of November there were 4.5 per cent more homes newly listed for sale and 6.6 per cent fewer overall homes for sale in Melbourne. Given values have been rising that suggests that there is not oversupply of homes for sale, buyers are buying the new homes and the older stock is also reducing. But what of the unit market? A casual glance at the Melbourne skyline shows a lot of new high rise residential towers being constructed. Our data shows that those units are finding buyers. The number of units listed for sale is marginally, 2.4 per cent lower than a year ago, and the overall number of units on the market is 3.3 per cent higher. That suggests that the supply is exceeding demand to a greater extent than is the case in the houses market. That is not necessarily a bad thing. Over the past decade the state government’s policies to address housing affordability concerns have been centred on increased supply in the inner city unit market and outer suburbs. The data shows that it is working. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist This was originally published on www.propertyobserver.com.au

Housing supply increases again after lowest clearance rate in 21 weeks

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 16 November 2014 There are 3,575 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,907 auctions expected compared to 2,814 for the same period last year. Last week the national clearance rate was the lowest for 21 weeks and it was the third consecutive week in which it fell. This trend is not unique and it happened last year as stock levels rose through November and December. Buyers looking for a home and buying at auction will welcome both the increased stock levels and lower clearance rate. There are 1,338 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,139 last week and 1,270 this time last year. It is interesting to note that the clearance rate has now fallen more than 10 points in the past two months. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 1,152 auctions compared to 1,261 last week and 1,099 for this week last year. Last week was the lowest clearance rate in Sydney in 21 weeks and provides a clear indication that the high stock levels are having an impact. Mosman has the highest volume of auctions for the second week in a row with 25 expected. In Brisbane 128 auctions are expected after 188 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 143 auctions, compared to 131 last week. Canberra has 68 auctions scheduled compared to 141 last week. Perth has 47 auctions compared to 65 last week There are 7 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Bentleigh East VIC which has 29 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 16 November, 2014

There are 1,338 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,270 for the same time last year. The most auctions will be found in Bentleigh East with 29. Auctions are generally more popular in the most expensive segment of the market and some suburbs have been recording multiple sales in the ultra expensive category. A review of suburbs ranked by the number of sales valued at more than $2m over the last year shows that three had more than 100; Brighton, Toorak and Kew. Camberwell, Canterbury, Balwyn, Hawthorn and Malvern had between 50 and 100. Outside of the leafy inner east there were some interesting results in Hampton, Elwood, Ivanhoe and Richmond had between 10 and 20 sales over $2m. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was stable at a very low 31 days over the last week and vendor discounting remained stable at -4.8 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 9 November: 65.5 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 16 November: 1,338 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 9 November: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 9 November: -4.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.3 per cent higher in month ending 9 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Bentleigh soon to become a million dollar suburb…

The most recent update to the list of million dollar suburbs in Melbourne has seen 50 reach or exceed that mark. This is an increase of one on last month with Caulfield East joining the list. The median value of a house in that suburb is now $1,002,366. Prior to Caulfield East the other recent additions were Fairfield and Aberfeldie. Those additions meant that Melbourne now has million dollar suburbs in the north, east, south and west of the city. The list is headed by the usual suspects; Toorak, Deepdene, Canterbury, Kooyong and East Melbourne. The median house value in Toorak is now $2.85m and unlike the majority of million dollar suburbs this number has fallen over the last year. The suburbs next in line do not contain many surprises but can also tell us a lot about housing values in Melbourne. The suburbs that are within $20,000 of the million dollar mark are Prahran, Carlton North, Port Melbourne, Williamstown and Bentleigh. Bentleigh is quite typical of the next group of suburbs that will join the list. It would have been quite surprising a few years ago to think of Bentleigh houses costing this much but with 97 selling for over a million in the last twelve months it now a regular feature of the area. A cursory glance at the ‘for sale’ advertisements shows a suburb undergoing significant change with an increase in multi unit dwellings replacing the older homes on what are now large blocks. These homes coexist with a mixture of styles that are clearly proving to be very popular with buyers. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The proportion of investment lending hits a record high in September

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS published housing finance data for September earlier this week. The data showed that the proportion of lending to investors hit a record high in September. At the same time the data indicates that demand from owner occupiers is starting to slow. Over recent years the data on the value of housing finance commitment has, to my mind, become much more important to focus on. The main reason being that this is the only data from the ABS that tracks the level of investment lending. The above chart uses raw not seasonally adjusted data and uses a 12 month average to smooth the volatility of the data. Nevertheless you can see the ongoing decline in demand from owner occupier first home buyers and more recently a dip in commitments by owner occupiers that already own a home. Across the four borrower types listed you can see that investors now account for the greatest proportion of borrowings from Australian Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions ADIs . Seasonally adjusted data for September 2014 showed that the value of owner occupier refinance commitments was 0.6%, owner occupier commitments excluding refinances rose 1.8% and investor commitments were 3.7% higher. Year-on-year, owner occupier refinance commitments are 13.7% higher, owner occupier commitments excluding refinances are 3.4% higher and investor finance commitments are 25.4% higher. The above chart highlights a couple of important things. Firstly, while owner occupier refinances and new loans those excluding refinances have flattened over recent months it seems as if there has been a resurgence in investor demand. Secondly, this is the first time ever that the value of monthly investment loans $11.9 billion has been greater than the value of owner occupier new loans $11.8 billion . The seasonally-adjusted data for September showed that investor finance commitments accounted for an all-time high proportion of lending by Australian ADIs. Comparing lending to investors against owner occupier refinances and owner occupier new loans investors accounted for 41.4% of lending, owner occupier new loans were 40.8% and owner occupier refinances were 17.9%. The proportion of lending to investors is at a record high while the proportion of lending for owner occupier new loans is at a record low. Of course, there is only a certain amount that can be borrowed each month but it is clear demand is strongest from the investment segment. In fact, if you exclude refinances, a record high 50.2% of new loans written are to investors. The headline result that gets reported on each month is the number of owner occupier loans. Although it is a very valuable statistic, it should be read with caution because it is missing a significant proportion of the market, those represented by investors. Over the month, there were 51,465 owner occupier housing finance commitments, the lowest number since January 2014. Month-on-month the number of loans for refinancing of established dwellings was -2.9% lower while non-refinances increased by 0.5%. Like the value growth chart presented earlier, the above chart indicates that the number of loans to owner occupiers has flattened over recent months. As investor activity has risen, there has been a sharp drop-off in the number of loans to first home buyers. Although there is no data to support it there are plenty of anecdotal suggestions that many first home buyers are choosing to purchase investment properties rather than homes for owner occupation. Unfortunately, the ABS data only captures those homes purchased by first home buyers for owner occupation. Owner occupier first home buyer numbers continue to languish at near record low levels. In September, first home buyers accounted for 12% of all owner occupier finance commitments however the number of loans actually rose by 4.7%. As mentioned earlier, the value of investment loans is at a record high, the previous peak was October 2003 and at that time investors accounted for a slightly higher 13.6% of all owner occupier housing finance commitments. What is more alarming is the drop off in volumes over recent years with that 13.6% actually being 8,481 finance commitments. The Reserve Bank RBA has already highlighted a number of times that they have some concerns with the heightened level of investment activity, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne. With the proportion of loans to investors hitting a new record high in September it will further re-iterate those concerns. The RBA has already flagged that themselves along with other regulators are already looking at ways to curb the level of investment however, they flagged in early September that any announcement would likely come by December. In the meantime, it looks like investor finance commitments have got another leg up and over the coming months we may see a further flurry of activity as investors look to enter the market prior to the implementation of any macroprudential curbs. With investor focus to-date very much on Sydney and Melbourne, it will be interesting to see if this remains the case when the lending finance data for September is released on Wednesday. If so, you do have to ask yourself what some of these investors are thinking. The housing markets in Sydney and Melbourne have been recording value growth since June 2012 and over that time value have increased by 29.8% and 20.7% respectively. Gross rental yields have fallen from 4.5% to 3.7% in Sydney and from 3.8% to 3.3% in Melbourne. I understand that investors need a return and aren’t getting that from keeping their cash in the bank but after almost two and a half years of value growth and a significant compression of rental yields you wonder how much value growth is left in these markets. Furthermore, with yields so low if there is little or no growth investors will be left with an asset that provides very little rental return.

National clearance rate of 63.7% recorded

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 9 November 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 63.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 68.7 per cent last week and 68.3 per cent this time last year. It is interesting to note that due to an increase in the popularity of auctions more homes have been sold in Sydney at auction this year than Melbourne. This is the first time this has occurred. After this week there have been 24,590 auction sales in Sydney and 24,336 in Melbourne. In Sydney market a preliminary clearance rate of 69 per cent recorded compared to 75.6 per cent last week and 76 per cent last year. After a fortnight of mild improvement the ongoing high volumes are clearly having an impact with a lower clearance rate this week. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 63.8 per cent recorded compared to 69.6 per cent last week and 68.1 per cent this time last year. The market is shifting in favor of buyers at the right time of the year with a high volume of auctions expected between now and Christmas. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 45 per cent was recorded compared to 45.3 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 61.3 per cent compared to 57.4 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 50.6 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 56.3 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne home values rise in October

Last month saw a new record week for auctions in Melbourne and an improvement in the whole residential market. In October there was a clearance rate of 70.5 per cent, down slightly from the same time last year when it was 71.5 per cent. The overall number of homes sold rose by 7.6 per cent with 3,551 selling compared to 3,300 in October last year. The performance of the auction market mirrored the broader one as shown in the RP Data CoreLogic Home Value Index for October. October was a relatively good month for sellers with the growth in home values increasing more strongly than in August and September. The index showed that Melbourne house values rose by 2.1 per cent over the month and by 1.8 per cent over the last three months. Units saw a small rise of 0.5 per cent in the month and 2.2 per cent in the quarter. More important, the longer term house value index outpaced units with a 9.5 per cent rise over this year compared to 3.1 per cent. Melbourne houses continued to return better capital gains based on strong supply in the more affordable unit markets. The Melbourne median house price was $615,000 based on the sales settled in the last three months. The unit median price was $472,000. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Why would deflation of our largest asset class be a good thing?

Balancing an economy is undoubtedly a tough ask for anyone. Our inflation targeting Reserve Bank looks to maintain inflation within a range of 2% to 3% on an annual basis over the cycle. Too much inflation is not ideal, nor is deflation, so the RBA tries to tweak monetary policy to stimulate the economy in order to see some inflation but not too much. If inflation runs too high consumption slows down as consumers simply can’t afford to purchase goods and services because they don’t have enough buying power. If deflation occurs consumers are also likely to stop spending because the value of any debt they have increases as opposed to reduces when there is inflation . Consumer buying power may increase during times of deflation; however the weak economic conditions that have caused prices to deflate are likely to also result in higher unemployment, a contraction in the number of jobs and a pessimistic consumer mindset. With the currently high levels of inflation in housing prices it stands to reason that the purchasing power of many consumers has diminished. When you think about the Australian housing market as a whole I don’t think anyone could argue that shelter in Australia is particularly affordable. In fact over the last two decades home values have increased at a rate much higher than inflation meaning that some in the community don’t have enough buying power to purchase shelter. As a result, many of these people are likely to rent. I am constantly surprised about articles and comments which seem to believe that a significant decline in Australian home values would be the preferred cure to housing affordability and a good outcome for the economy. If we look purely at the inflation and deflation argument some people would say we have had too much inflation of home values however, the solution to that problem is not to aim for deflating current home values. The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS estimated that as at June 2014, the total value of Australia’s dwelling stock was $5.2 trillion and there were an estimated 9,366,800 dwellings across the country note that RP Data we estimate the total value of residential dwellings to be somewhat higher at $5.5 trillion as at June 2014 . To put this $5.2 trillion in dwellings into perspective, over the 12 months to June 2014, GDP, or the total output of the national economy, was recorded at $1.57 trillion. What this means is that the value of residential dwellings was more than three times greater than the annual output of the economy. According to data released by the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA , Australian authorised deposit-taking institutions ADIs held $1.225 trillion in loans against these dwellings across 5,079,800 mortgages. So what do these figures tell us? 54.2% of dwellings across Australia have a mortgage to an Australian ADI and 23.6% of the total value of Australian dwellings is outstanding to Australian ADIs. The ratio of debt held against the total value of the housing asset class is very low however, this ratio includes all dwellings not just those where a mortgage is held . In the event of a downturn those with high leverage are likely to be much more significantly impacted. It also probably reflects that quite a lot of dwellings have no mortgage the 2011 Census indicated that roughly one third of Australia dwellings were owned outright while a proportion will also have mortgages sourced from non ADI lenders or offshore banks. Australian’s choose to hold a large proportion of their wealth in residential property; this is highlighted by the $5.2 trillion total value of residential dwellings. Data published quarterly by the Reserve Bank shows that while the typical household’s ratio of housing debt to disposable income in 137.1%, the typical household’s ratio of housing assets to disposable income is a much larger 433.6% making up 54% of the typical households assets. Over the past couple of decades Australian ADIs have shown a preference for lending to housing as opposed to lending for personal loans or to business. Of course, the ADIs have had good reason to preference housing lending; it has generally performed well with low mortgage arrears, the return on equity is strong, earnings from mortgages are consistent, higher risk loans are generally insured via lender’s mortgage insurance LMI , home values have generally trended higher and Australian’s tend to prioritise repayments of their mortgage. But this does not mean that home owners and the economy could withstand a significant deflation in home values. Nor does it mean that a significant deflation in housing values would be a tonic for those that can’t afford to own a house to finally achieve home ownership. Why would deflation in an asset which is more than three times larger than the annual output of the economy play out any better than deflation in an economic sense? In fact, were home values to deflate it could be argued that the whole economy would suffer as consumers stopped consuming. As consumers stop spending unemployment would likely rise, ADIs would stop lending and there is a high likelihood the Australian economy would enter a recession. Remember, it isn’t only those with a mortgage which would face the prospect of unemployment, so too would all those people who are yet to purchase a home waiting for the collapse to enter into the market at rock bottom prices. A more desirable solution to improve housing affordability in my opinion is to look for a more moderate level of growth in home values while improving both the supply and demand side of the equations. A sustained period in which home values grow at a rate below inflation would be an ideal way in which to improve affordability rather than a large-scale bust. Interestingly, as we showed in last week’s blog a number of cities have recorded value growth below the rate of inflation over a number of years now although this hasn’t been the case in Sydney and Melbourne . Housing booms make it harder for prospective home owners to enter into home ownership, however I would argue that busts are much worse. Furthermore the level of exposure to the housing market by ADIs and residents would mean a housing bust has much more far reaching repercussions for the economy. Although stress tests indicate that most ADIs could cope with a significant decline in home values the impact on households and the Australian economy as a whole would likely send Australian into a recession. This is why rapid deflation in home values is just as, if not more undesirable than rapid inflation and why the goal should be moderate growth in home values with a growth rate that broadly trends in line with household income growth over the cycle. If we want to reduce the cost of housing from its current level with minimal overall economic damage, home value appreciation below the rate of inflation for a number of years is what I see as an ideal solution. Of course achieving this means that governments need to address the factors that drive a high level of housing demand and those which constrain the overall supply of housing and drive the cost of this new supply higher.

This weekend’s national auction preview sees record auctions in Canberra

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 9 November 2014 There are 3,174 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,607 auctions expected compared to 2,548 for the same period last year. Canberra will have a record number of auctions this week, becoming the second capital city to post a record in the past few weeks. There are 999 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 220 last week and 1,123 this time last year. In October the clearance rate was 70.5 per cent, down slightly from the same time last year when it was 71.5 per cent. The overall number of homes sold rose by 7.6 per cent with 3,551 selling compared to 3,300 in October last year. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 1,112 auctions compared to 1,259 last week and 1, 043 for this week last year. After what had been a lackluster October, with 5.4 per cent fewer sales at auction than in September, vendors intending to sell over the next few weeks will have been pleased to see the moderate improvement last week. In Brisbane 174 auctions are expected after 246 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 119 auctions, compared to 127 last week. Canberra has 136 auctions scheduled compared to 89 last week. This is the first time in history that the national capital has seen more than 100 auctions in a week. The previous high was 93 auctions in late November last year. The highest number of auctions will be found in Kambah and MacGregor, both of which have 8 scheduled. Perth has 60 auctions compared to 34 last week. There are 16 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Mosman NSW which has 32 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 9 November, 2014

There are 999 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,123 for the same time last year. The most auctions will be found in Mount Waverley with 20 followed by 19 in St Kilda and 16 in Glen Waverley. With just under two months remaining in the year it is worth noting that October was a relatively good month for sellers with the growth in home values increasing more strongly than in August and September. The release this week of the RP Data CoreLogic Home Value Index showed that Melbourne house values rose by 2.1 per cent over the month and by 1.8 per cent over the last three months. Units saw a small rise of 0.5 per cent in the month and 2.2 per cent in the quarter. Over the more important longer term, the house value index outpaced units with a 9.5 per cent rise over this year compared to 3.1 per cent. Auction market conditions are similar to those in the private sale market. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale tightened again from 33 days to 31 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting remained stable at -4.8 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 2 November: 69.6 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 9 November: 999 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 2 November: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 2 November: -4.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 5.2 per cent higher in month ending 2 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Auction volumes rise 14% on 2013

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 16 November 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 69 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 63.5 per cent last week and 67.4 per cent this time last year. Auction volumes were 14 per cent higher than this time last year due to increased listings in both Sydney and Melbourne. Higher stock levels are providing increased opportunities for buyers in capital cities, especially in Melbourne. In Sydney the auction market returned to trend after the second highest volume this year. A preliminary clearance rate of 75.2 per cent recorded compared to 68.1 per cent last week and 75.3 per cent last year. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 66.7 per cent was recorded compared to 65.5 per cent last week and 69 per cent this time last year. Lower clearance rates have certainly been observed over the last three weeks. Analysis shows that they have returned to trend after what was in retrospect a strong early spring. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 45.3 per cent was recorded compared to 43.1 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 60.7 per cent compared to 57.4 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 66 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 66.7 per cent was recorded. In Tasmania 4 auction sales were recorded and 3 homes were passed in. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Housing supply increases again after lowest clearance rate in 21 weeks

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 16 November 2014 There are 3,575 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,907 auctions expected compared to 2,814 for the same period last year. Last week the national clearance rate was the lowest for 21 weeks and it was the third consecutive week in which it fell. This trend is not unique and it happened last year as stock levels rose through November and December. Buyers looking for a home and buying at auction will welcome both the increased stock levels and lower clearance rate. There are 1,338 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,139 last week and 1,270 this time last year. It is interesting to note that the clearance rate has now fallen more than 10 points in the past two months. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 1,152 auctions compared to 1,261 last week and 1,099 for this week last year. Last week was the lowest clearance rate in Sydney in 21 weeks and provides a clear indication that the high stock levels are having an impact. Mosman has the highest volume of auctions for the second week in a row with 25 expected. In Brisbane 128 auctions are expected after 188 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 143 auctions, compared to 131 last week. Canberra has 68 auctions scheduled compared to 141 last week. Perth has 47 auctions compared to 65 last week There are 7 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Bentleigh East VIC which has 29 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 16 November, 2014

There are 1,338 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,270 for the same time last year. The most auctions will be found in Bentleigh East with 29. Auctions are generally more popular in the most expensive segment of the market and some suburbs have been recording multiple sales in the ultra expensive category. A review of suburbs ranked by the number of sales valued at more than $2m over the last year shows that three had more than 100; Brighton, Toorak and Kew. Camberwell, Canterbury, Balwyn, Hawthorn and Malvern had between 50 and 100. Outside of the leafy inner east there were some interesting results in Hampton, Elwood, Ivanhoe and Richmond had between 10 and 20 sales over $2m. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale was stable at a very low 31 days over the last week and vendor discounting remained stable at -4.8 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 9 November: 65.5 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 16 November: 1,338 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 9 November: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 9 November: -4.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.3 per cent higher in month ending 9 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Bentleigh soon to become a million dollar suburb…

The most recent update to the list of million dollar suburbs in Melbourne has seen 50 reach or exceed that mark. This is an increase of one on last month with Caulfield East joining the list. The median value of a house in that suburb is now $1,002,366. Prior to Caulfield East the other recent additions were Fairfield and Aberfeldie. Those additions meant that Melbourne now has million dollar suburbs in the north, east, south and west of the city. The list is headed by the usual suspects; Toorak, Deepdene, Canterbury, Kooyong and East Melbourne. The median house value in Toorak is now $2.85m and unlike the majority of million dollar suburbs this number has fallen over the last year. The suburbs next in line do not contain many surprises but can also tell us a lot about housing values in Melbourne. The suburbs that are within $20,000 of the million dollar mark are Prahran, Carlton North, Port Melbourne, Williamstown and Bentleigh. Bentleigh is quite typical of the next group of suburbs that will join the list. It would have been quite surprising a few years ago to think of Bentleigh houses costing this much but with 97 selling for over a million in the last twelve months it now a regular feature of the area. A cursory glance at the ‘for sale’ advertisements shows a suburb undergoing significant change with an increase in multi unit dwellings replacing the older homes on what are now large blocks. These homes coexist with a mixture of styles that are clearly proving to be very popular with buyers. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The proportion of investment lending hits a record high in September

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS published housing finance data for September earlier this week. The data showed that the proportion of lending to investors hit a record high in September. At the same time the data indicates that demand from owner occupiers is starting to slow. Over recent years the data on the value of housing finance commitment has, to my mind, become much more important to focus on. The main reason being that this is the only data from the ABS that tracks the level of investment lending. The above chart uses raw not seasonally adjusted data and uses a 12 month average to smooth the volatility of the data. Nevertheless you can see the ongoing decline in demand from owner occupier first home buyers and more recently a dip in commitments by owner occupiers that already own a home. Across the four borrower types listed you can see that investors now account for the greatest proportion of borrowings from Australian Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions ADIs . Seasonally adjusted data for September 2014 showed that the value of owner occupier refinance commitments was 0.6%, owner occupier commitments excluding refinances rose 1.8% and investor commitments were 3.7% higher. Year-on-year, owner occupier refinance commitments are 13.7% higher, owner occupier commitments excluding refinances are 3.4% higher and investor finance commitments are 25.4% higher. The above chart highlights a couple of important things. Firstly, while owner occupier refinances and new loans those excluding refinances have flattened over recent months it seems as if there has been a resurgence in investor demand. Secondly, this is the first time ever that the value of monthly investment loans $11.9 billion has been greater than the value of owner occupier new loans $11.8 billion . The seasonally-adjusted data for September showed that investor finance commitments accounted for an all-time high proportion of lending by Australian ADIs. Comparing lending to investors against owner occupier refinances and owner occupier new loans investors accounted for 41.4% of lending, owner occupier new loans were 40.8% and owner occupier refinances were 17.9%. The proportion of lending to investors is at a record high while the proportion of lending for owner occupier new loans is at a record low. Of course, there is only a certain amount that can be borrowed each month but it is clear demand is strongest from the investment segment. In fact, if you exclude refinances, a record high 50.2% of new loans written are to investors. The headline result that gets reported on each month is the number of owner occupier loans. Although it is a very valuable statistic, it should be read with caution because it is missing a significant proportion of the market, those represented by investors. Over the month, there were 51,465 owner occupier housing finance commitments, the lowest number since January 2014. Month-on-month the number of loans for refinancing of established dwellings was -2.9% lower while non-refinances increased by 0.5%. Like the value growth chart presented earlier, the above chart indicates that the number of loans to owner occupiers has flattened over recent months. As investor activity has risen, there has been a sharp drop-off in the number of loans to first home buyers. Although there is no data to support it there are plenty of anecdotal suggestions that many first home buyers are choosing to purchase investment properties rather than homes for owner occupation. Unfortunately, the ABS data only captures those homes purchased by first home buyers for owner occupation. Owner occupier first home buyer numbers continue to languish at near record low levels. In September, first home buyers accounted for 12% of all owner occupier finance commitments however the number of loans actually rose by 4.7%. As mentioned earlier, the value of investment loans is at a record high, the previous peak was October 2003 and at that time investors accounted for a slightly higher 13.6% of all owner occupier housing finance commitments. What is more alarming is the drop off in volumes over recent years with that 13.6% actually being 8,481 finance commitments. The Reserve Bank RBA has already highlighted a number of times that they have some concerns with the heightened level of investment activity, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne. With the proportion of loans to investors hitting a new record high in September it will further re-iterate those concerns. The RBA has already flagged that themselves along with other regulators are already looking at ways to curb the level of investment however, they flagged in early September that any announcement would likely come by December. In the meantime, it looks like investor finance commitments have got another leg up and over the coming months we may see a further flurry of activity as investors look to enter the market prior to the implementation of any macroprudential curbs. With investor focus to-date very much on Sydney and Melbourne, it will be interesting to see if this remains the case when the lending finance data for September is released on Wednesday. If so, you do have to ask yourself what some of these investors are thinking. The housing markets in Sydney and Melbourne have been recording value growth since June 2012 and over that time value have increased by 29.8% and 20.7% respectively. Gross rental yields have fallen from 4.5% to 3.7% in Sydney and from 3.8% to 3.3% in Melbourne. I understand that investors need a return and aren’t getting that from keeping their cash in the bank but after almost two and a half years of value growth and a significant compression of rental yields you wonder how much value growth is left in these markets. Furthermore, with yields so low if there is little or no growth investors will be left with an asset that provides very little rental return.

National clearance rate of 63.7% recorded

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 9 November 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 63.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 68.7 per cent last week and 68.3 per cent this time last year. It is interesting to note that due to an increase in the popularity of auctions more homes have been sold in Sydney at auction this year than Melbourne. This is the first time this has occurred. After this week there have been 24,590 auction sales in Sydney and 24,336 in Melbourne. In Sydney market a preliminary clearance rate of 69 per cent recorded compared to 75.6 per cent last week and 76 per cent last year. After a fortnight of mild improvement the ongoing high volumes are clearly having an impact with a lower clearance rate this week. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 63.8 per cent recorded compared to 69.6 per cent last week and 68.1 per cent this time last year. The market is shifting in favor of buyers at the right time of the year with a high volume of auctions expected between now and Christmas. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 45 per cent was recorded compared to 45.3 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 61.3 per cent compared to 57.4 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 50.6 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 56.3 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne home values rise in October

Last month saw a new record week for auctions in Melbourne and an improvement in the whole residential market. In October there was a clearance rate of 70.5 per cent, down slightly from the same time last year when it was 71.5 per cent. The overall number of homes sold rose by 7.6 per cent with 3,551 selling compared to 3,300 in October last year. The performance of the auction market mirrored the broader one as shown in the RP Data CoreLogic Home Value Index for October. October was a relatively good month for sellers with the growth in home values increasing more strongly than in August and September. The index showed that Melbourne house values rose by 2.1 per cent over the month and by 1.8 per cent over the last three months. Units saw a small rise of 0.5 per cent in the month and 2.2 per cent in the quarter. More important, the longer term house value index outpaced units with a 9.5 per cent rise over this year compared to 3.1 per cent. Melbourne houses continued to return better capital gains based on strong supply in the more affordable unit markets. The Melbourne median house price was $615,000 based on the sales settled in the last three months. The unit median price was $472,000. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Why would deflation of our largest asset class be a good thing?

Balancing an economy is undoubtedly a tough ask for anyone. Our inflation targeting Reserve Bank looks to maintain inflation within a range of 2% to 3% on an annual basis over the cycle. Too much inflation is not ideal, nor is deflation, so the RBA tries to tweak monetary policy to stimulate the economy in order to see some inflation but not too much. If inflation runs too high consumption slows down as consumers simply can’t afford to purchase goods and services because they don’t have enough buying power. If deflation occurs consumers are also likely to stop spending because the value of any debt they have increases as opposed to reduces when there is inflation . Consumer buying power may increase during times of deflation; however the weak economic conditions that have caused prices to deflate are likely to also result in higher unemployment, a contraction in the number of jobs and a pessimistic consumer mindset. With the currently high levels of inflation in housing prices it stands to reason that the purchasing power of many consumers has diminished. When you think about the Australian housing market as a whole I don’t think anyone could argue that shelter in Australia is particularly affordable. In fact over the last two decades home values have increased at a rate much higher than inflation meaning that some in the community don’t have enough buying power to purchase shelter. As a result, many of these people are likely to rent. I am constantly surprised about articles and comments which seem to believe that a significant decline in Australian home values would be the preferred cure to housing affordability and a good outcome for the economy. If we look purely at the inflation and deflation argument some people would say we have had too much inflation of home values however, the solution to that problem is not to aim for deflating current home values. The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS estimated that as at June 2014, the total value of Australia’s dwelling stock was $5.2 trillion and there were an estimated 9,366,800 dwellings across the country note that RP Data we estimate the total value of residential dwellings to be somewhat higher at $5.5 trillion as at June 2014 . To put this $5.2 trillion in dwellings into perspective, over the 12 months to June 2014, GDP, or the total output of the national economy, was recorded at $1.57 trillion. What this means is that the value of residential dwellings was more than three times greater than the annual output of the economy. According to data released by the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA , Australian authorised deposit-taking institutions ADIs held $1.225 trillion in loans against these dwellings across 5,079,800 mortgages. So what do these figures tell us? 54.2% of dwellings across Australia have a mortgage to an Australian ADI and 23.6% of the total value of Australian dwellings is outstanding to Australian ADIs. The ratio of debt held against the total value of the housing asset class is very low however, this ratio includes all dwellings not just those where a mortgage is held . In the event of a downturn those with high leverage are likely to be much more significantly impacted. It also probably reflects that quite a lot of dwellings have no mortgage the 2011 Census indicated that roughly one third of Australia dwellings were owned outright while a proportion will also have mortgages sourced from non ADI lenders or offshore banks. Australian’s choose to hold a large proportion of their wealth in residential property; this is highlighted by the $5.2 trillion total value of residential dwellings. Data published quarterly by the Reserve Bank shows that while the typical household’s ratio of housing debt to disposable income in 137.1%, the typical household’s ratio of housing assets to disposable income is a much larger 433.6% making up 54% of the typical households assets. Over the past couple of decades Australian ADIs have shown a preference for lending to housing as opposed to lending for personal loans or to business. Of course, the ADIs have had good reason to preference housing lending; it has generally performed well with low mortgage arrears, the return on equity is strong, earnings from mortgages are consistent, higher risk loans are generally insured via lender’s mortgage insurance LMI , home values have generally trended higher and Australian’s tend to prioritise repayments of their mortgage. But this does not mean that home owners and the economy could withstand a significant deflation in home values. Nor does it mean that a significant deflation in housing values would be a tonic for those that can’t afford to own a house to finally achieve home ownership. Why would deflation in an asset which is more than three times larger than the annual output of the economy play out any better than deflation in an economic sense? In fact, were home values to deflate it could be argued that the whole economy would suffer as consumers stopped consuming. As consumers stop spending unemployment would likely rise, ADIs would stop lending and there is a high likelihood the Australian economy would enter a recession. Remember, it isn’t only those with a mortgage which would face the prospect of unemployment, so too would all those people who are yet to purchase a home waiting for the collapse to enter into the market at rock bottom prices. A more desirable solution to improve housing affordability in my opinion is to look for a more moderate level of growth in home values while improving both the supply and demand side of the equations. A sustained period in which home values grow at a rate below inflation would be an ideal way in which to improve affordability rather than a large-scale bust. Interestingly, as we showed in last week’s blog a number of cities have recorded value growth below the rate of inflation over a number of years now although this hasn’t been the case in Sydney and Melbourne . Housing booms make it harder for prospective home owners to enter into home ownership, however I would argue that busts are much worse. Furthermore the level of exposure to the housing market by ADIs and residents would mean a housing bust has much more far reaching repercussions for the economy. Although stress tests indicate that most ADIs could cope with a significant decline in home values the impact on households and the Australian economy as a whole would likely send Australian into a recession. This is why rapid deflation in home values is just as, if not more undesirable than rapid inflation and why the goal should be moderate growth in home values with a growth rate that broadly trends in line with household income growth over the cycle. If we want to reduce the cost of housing from its current level with minimal overall economic damage, home value appreciation below the rate of inflation for a number of years is what I see as an ideal solution. Of course achieving this means that governments need to address the factors that drive a high level of housing demand and those which constrain the overall supply of housing and drive the cost of this new supply higher.

This weekend’s national auction preview sees record auctions in Canberra

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 9 November 2014 There are 3,174 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,607 auctions expected compared to 2,548 for the same period last year. Canberra will have a record number of auctions this week, becoming the second capital city to post a record in the past few weeks. There are 999 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 220 last week and 1,123 this time last year. In October the clearance rate was 70.5 per cent, down slightly from the same time last year when it was 71.5 per cent. The overall number of homes sold rose by 7.6 per cent with 3,551 selling compared to 3,300 in October last year. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 1,112 auctions compared to 1,259 last week and 1, 043 for this week last year. After what had been a lackluster October, with 5.4 per cent fewer sales at auction than in September, vendors intending to sell over the next few weeks will have been pleased to see the moderate improvement last week. In Brisbane 174 auctions are expected after 246 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 119 auctions, compared to 127 last week. Canberra has 136 auctions scheduled compared to 89 last week. This is the first time in history that the national capital has seen more than 100 auctions in a week. The previous high was 93 auctions in late November last year. The highest number of auctions will be found in Kambah and MacGregor, both of which have 8 scheduled. Perth has 60 auctions compared to 34 last week. There are 16 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Mosman NSW which has 32 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 9 November, 2014

There are 999 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,123 for the same time last year. The most auctions will be found in Mount Waverley with 20 followed by 19 in St Kilda and 16 in Glen Waverley. With just under two months remaining in the year it is worth noting that October was a relatively good month for sellers with the growth in home values increasing more strongly than in August and September. The release this week of the RP Data CoreLogic Home Value Index showed that Melbourne house values rose by 2.1 per cent over the month and by 1.8 per cent over the last three months. Units saw a small rise of 0.5 per cent in the month and 2.2 per cent in the quarter. Over the more important longer term, the house value index outpaced units with a 9.5 per cent rise over this year compared to 3.1 per cent. Auction market conditions are similar to those in the private sale market. On a citywide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale tightened again from 33 days to 31 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting remained stable at -4.8 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 2 November: 69.6 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 9 November: 999 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 2 November: 31 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 2 November: -4.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 5.2 per cent higher in month ending 2 November seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Sydney leads way from the weekend’s auction market results

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 2 November 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 71.1 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 69.3 per cent last week and 70.3 per cent this time last year. With volumes low in Melbourne due to the Melbourne Cup the main activity in the auction market was in Sydney which had its eighth week with over 1,000 auctions for the year and continued to record above trend results. The Sydney market continues to strengthen with a preliminary clearance rate of 78.5 per cent recorded compared to 74.8 per cent last week and 75 per cent last year. The improving trend is apparent over the medium term as well with a citywide clearance rate the first ten months of the year of 75.1 per cent compared to 72.5 per cent a year ago. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 68.2 per cent recorded compared to 71 per cent last week and 70.8 per cent this time last year. From a clearance rate perspective the Melbourne market is marginally down on a year ago with a year to date clearance rate of 68.9 per cent compared to 69.6 per cent. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 47.3 per cent was recorded compared to 46.3 per cent last week. The Brisbane auction market is stronger than a year ago with a clearance rate of 46.3 per cent compared to 41.2 per cent. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 61.5 per cent compared to 56.5 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 70.6 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 46.7 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Growth in Sydney volumes after records in Melbourne

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 2 November 2014 There are 2,380 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,830 auctions expected compared to 1,668 for the same period last year. National auction numbers are lower this week – all due to the break for Tuesday’s Melbourne Cup horse race. There are 175 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,837 last week and 196 this time last year. After final results were collected last week’s 1,837 auctions broke the previous record by 13.5 per cent. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 1,159 auctions compared to 961 last week and 1,105 for this week last year. This is the first weekend of the spring selling season with more than 1,000 auctions and the eighth for the year. The fact that at this stage last year there had been none provides another example of how volumes have risen this year. Auction volumes are increasing in Brisbane with 216 auctions expected after 211 were held last week. They are also well up on last year when there was only 133. The highest volume of auctions this week is expected in Ascot, which has 9. Adelaide is expecting 159 auctions, compared to 127 last week. Canberra has 77 auctions scheduled compared to 56 last week. Perth has 23 auctions compared to 34 last week There are 16 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Maroubra which has 22 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Inflation adjusted home values have only risen over recent years in Sydney, Melbourne, Darwin and Canberra

Earlier this month the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released its quarterly Consumer Price Index CPI or inflation figures. The data showed that over the September 2014 quarter, inflation was recorded at 0.5% and over the 12 months to September 2014 it was recorded at 2.3%. The Reserve Bank has a target range for annual inflation of 2% to 3% and inflation is currently at the lower end of this range. It is important to note that inflation appears to be slowing, recorded at an annualised rate of just 1.8% over the past six months. With the release of CPI data we can also get a picture of what is happening with home values when adjusted for the effects of inflation. Over the 12 months to September 2014, combined capital city home values have increased by 9.3% in nominal terms according to the RP Data CoreLogic Home Value Index, in ‘real’ terms home values have risen by 6.8% over the past 12 months. The impact of inflation is important to consider, as you will note from the above chart. For example in nominal terms home values recorded no annualised falls from September 1998 until December 2008. In real terms, values were falling from December 2004 to December 2005. Of course when you adjust for inflation, real growth in home values is more moderate than in nominal terms. Across the combined capital cities, home values have increased by 9.3% over the past year, 3.8% pa over the past five years, 4.7% pa over the past decade and 7.4% pa over the past 15 years in nominal terms. Adjusting for inflation shows that real gains have been significantly lower. Over the past year real capital city home values are 6.8% higher, over the past five years they are 1.2% pa, over the decade they have risen by 1.9% pa and over the past 15 years they are up 4.3% pa. Home values rose at a rate well above inflation between 1999 and 2004 and again over the past 12 months however over the past five and 10 years overall home value growth has been less than 2% greater than the rate of inflation. Sydney and Melbourne have been the strongest capital cities for value growth over the past year and consistently over recent years. In nominal terms, values have increased by 14.3% and 8.1% respectively over the past year. As the above chart shows, when you adjust the growth in values for the effects of inflation, the level of growth is lower. Note that real home values have still increased in each capital city except for Canberra over the past year. Although, outside of Sydney, Melbourne and Darwin the rate of growth has been 4.0% or less in all cities. As we have already highlighted, real home value falls are much more frequent than falls in nominal terms. This is also the case across the individual capital city markets. As you can note from the above chart, outside of Sydney and Melbourne, real increases in home values over the past two years have been minor. Combined capital city home values began to recover from the financial crisis at the beginning of 2009 after reaching a low point in December 2008. Since that time, nominal home values have increased by 34.0% across the combined capitals, largely driven by increases of 51.2% in Sydney and 44.9% in Melbourne. Notably, Brisbane 6.0% , Adelaide 10.9% , Perth 14.5% and Hobart -1.6% have all recorded nominal gains of less than 15% since December 2008. In real terms, between December 2008 and September 2014, combined capital city home values have increased by a much lower 16.5%. Across the individual capital cities, real changes in home values between December 2008 and September 2014 have been recorded at: 31.6% in Sydney, 26.1% in Melbourne, -8.0% in Brisbane, -3.7% in Adelaide, -0.6% in Perth, -14.7% in Hobart, 11.0% in Canberra and 5.1% in Darwin. The next time you hear someone talk of the booming national housing market remember these statistics. Yes combined capital city home values are rising and this is due to the influence of the Sydney and Melbourne housing markets where values are rising. Real home values in Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth and Hobart are still lower than they were before the financial crisis and have seen no real growth in more than six years. The data also seemingly indicates that low interest rates are not necessarily the driving factor behind the current growth in the housing market. If this was the case we would more than likely be seeing a more broad-based rise in home values. The growth in home values has been contained to Sydney and Melbourne and to a lesser degree Darwin and Canberra. No wonder the Reserve Bank has flagged that monetary policy has largely done all it can and now fiscal policy has to do some of the heavy lifting. Lower interest rates have encouraged rises in values in Sydney and Melbourne accompanied by a substantial lift in activity by investors. However, outside of Sydney and Melbourne the housing market response, in terms of value growth, has been quite muted. Supply is responding across most cities which is certainly a desirable outcome. Yet despite real value falls over a number of years in Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth and Hobart, low mortgage rates and increasing new supply has not yet resulted in an ongoing rise in home values. Of course this is not necessarily a bad thing but is somewhat surprising given the experience in Sydney and Melbourne. I think what we are seeing is a case whereby our largest capital cities are further separating themselves from the rest of the pack. Sydney has pretty much always been the most expensive capital city market and this remains the case but we are now also seeing Melbourne separate itself from the remaining cities. Another factor driving the rising demand are potentially a greater number of overseas buyers investing in our two largest cities unfortunately data capture is such that we don’t really know for sure . Furthermore both New South Wales and Victoria are experiencing a much lower outflow of residents to other states than they have in the past. Finally, the economies of Sydney and Melbourne are much more diversified economies than those of the other capital cities which tend to be much more narrowly focussed. This is likely to be a key driver of higher housing demand and stronger value growth in these cities compared to the other capitals with a greater variety of job options available in these cities. As home values continue to rise in Sydney and Melbourne lower income families and first home buyers may find it more difficult to enter the market. This may result in some buyers looking to other capital cities in which to purchase homes. Of course, if the purchase is for owner occupation, the narrower economies may make it more difficult for these home owners to find appropriate employment in their new cities.

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 2 November, 2014

There are 175 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 196 for the same time last year. The low volumes are a result of the Melbourne Cup on Tuesday and ensure that the week’s auction results will not be a useful auction market indicator. Last week’s record volume of auctions and sales provides a clear indication that the remaining 7 weeks should provide healthy outcomes for sellers. On a city wide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale tightened again from 36 days to 33 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting remained stable at -4.8 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 26 October: 71 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 2 November: 175 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 26 October: 33 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 26 October: -4.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.7 per cent higher in month ending 26 October seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne auctions providing growth in transactions

Melbourne property market transaction numbers are marginally higher on what they were this time last year with the growth largely coming through auction sales. Comparing the months with the vast majority of settled sales, from January to July, the results show a rise of 3.7 per cent compared to a year ago. On a month by month basis, the majority of the growth occurred in March and April when in excess of 1,000 auctions were recorded across 5 consecutive weeks. This same occurrence also took place between 2012 and 2013. In 2013 there were 9,738 more home sales in Melbourne than in 2012 and there were 10,175 extra sales by auction. The growth in volumes was completely accounted for through the use of auctions. The same seems to be the case this year. Based on the first seven months of the year, there have been 1,725 more home sales and at the same time 3,248 more sales by auction. These numbers highlight one of the key characteristics about auctions and where they work well when there is competition between buyers. Competition such as this can arise through many means; there may be an inadequate number of homes on the market or something unique about the property in question. This is why auctions are rarely used in the outer suburbs and more frequently used in the inner city. When making the decision of how to sell, owners would be well advised to keep this factor in mind and listen to the advice of their real estate agent. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Records broken in auction market

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 26 October 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 70.5 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 68.6 per cent last week and 71.8 per cent this time last year. This was a strong week for auctions nationally and results suggest that the remaining eight weeks should provide good outcomes for sellers and plenty of choice for buyers. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 78.1 per cent was recorded compared to 72 per cent last week and 79.7 per cent last year. After two lackluster weeks the Sydney market has returned to trend. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 70.6 per cent recorded compared to 71.7 per cent last week and 71.9 per cent this time last year. Not only were there a record number of auctions but a record number of homes sold at auction with the previous high of 1,163 from a year ago surpassed. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 50.6 per cent was recorded compared to 46 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 55.6 per cent compared to 53.3 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 58.3 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 28.6 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Record volumes in Melbourne as national auctions exceed 3,000 mark

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 26 October 2014 There are 3,434 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,883 auctions expected compared to 2,941 for the same period last year. With a record volume expected in Melbourne this week it is interesting to reflect on the highest volumes in other capital cities. Sydney’s record was 1,496 in April this year, in Adelaide the record of 188 was posted in April 2011, in Brisbane it was 245 in December last year, Canberra saw 93 auctions in November last year and in Perth it was 79 in early December last year. There are 1,641 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,167 last week and 1,619 this time last year. This will be a new all time record for the number of auctions in a week in Melbourne, exceeding the previous record set last year Based on the past fortnight, the Sydney auction market appears to have softened marginally. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 859 auctions compared to 929 last week and 927 for this week last year. The most auctions will be found in Randwick where 14 are expected Brisbane is expecting 184 auctions after 159 were held last week Adelaide is expecting 115 auctions, compared to 103 last week Canberra has 52 auctions scheduled compared to 55 last week Perth has 22 auctions compared to 23 last week There are 13 auctions scheduled in Tasmania Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Brighton Vic and Richmond Vic each of which has 27 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 26 October, 2014

There are 1,641 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,619 for the same time last year. This is an all time record for the Melbourne auction market. This highest volume of auctions will be found in Brighton and Richmond where 27 are expected followed by 25 in Hawthorn, 24 in Reservoir and 23 in both Brunswick and St Kilda. Prior to this week, the previous record number of auctions was the same week last year. Over the past few years this week in October has regularly featured the peak number of auctions for each of the years as sellers avoid the following week due to Derby Day and the Melbourne Cup. On a city wide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale tightened from 37 days to 36 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting fell from -4.9 per cent to -4.8 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 19 October: 71.2 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 26 October: 1641 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 19 October: 36 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 19 October: -4.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.7 per cent higher in month ending 19 October seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Record interstate migration to Victoria, while mining states are at or approaching record low interstate migration flows

The speed of population growth into Australia has been winding down since reaching a recent annual peak in December 2012 when the national population grew by 1.78% over the year. With overseas migration moderating and a slowdown in the rate of natural increase, the annual rate of population growth across the country has slipped to 1.69% over the year ending March 2014. The more timely overseas arrivals and departures data indicates that net overseas migration to Australia is continuing to slow down, so we should expect the rate of population growth to continue tapering over the near term. Across the states there is a third component of population growth; interstate migration flows. The trends of migration flows between the states has been changing over the past few years with the mining states demonstrating a sharp slowdown in both overseas migration flows as well as less net migration across the state borders. Conversely, the non-mining states are seeing a pick-up in interstate migration flows as workers ‘bounce’ back from resources sector jobs that are no longer there. The following dashboards highlight the interstate migration flows for each state; what are the overall interstate migration trends, where are the migrants coming from and where are they going to? Across NSW interstate migration remains in negative territory in fact there hasn’t been a single period over the ABS historical series where net interstate migration has moved into positive territory in NSW . With a net interstate migration figure of -1,036 over the twelve months ending March 2014, this is the smallest net loss of interstate migrants for NSW on record. The improved interstate migration figures are largely being driven by an improvement in net migration between Queensland where the net rate of interstate migration was at a record low of -4,786 over the year to March 2014. To provide some context, in 2003 the net interstate migration deficit between NSW and Qld was just under 26,000. Victoria is now the national leader for interstate migration, taking the title away from Queensland since the September quarter last year based on annual net migration figures. Net interstate migration into Victoria is currently at a record high with a net 2,468 more residents moving to the state from other regions of Australia. Net migrants from NSW were the most substantial interstate contributors to Victorian population growth; however the trend of interstate arrivals from the mining states to Victoria is at record levels and trending higher. Queensland is no longer attracting the largest number of net interstate migrants, falling to second position after Victoria since the September quarter last year. Over the year to March 2014 the state of Queensland attracted an additional 5,772 net interstate migrants which is only slightly higher than the previous all-time low of 5,384 net interstate migrants recorded over the year ending December 2010. Net interstate migration into South Australia hasn’t changed a great deal over recent years with the quarterly rate of net migrants typically bouncing between -1,500 and -500 over the past decade. The largest portion of state residents are lost to Victoria, where over the year ending March 2014 there was a net interstate loss of 1,827 residents to Victoria. Western Australia still lays claim to the title of ‘fastest growing state’ with an annual population growth rate of 2.5%, there has been a consistent moderation in the rate of growth since a recent annual peak of 3.72% over the year ending September 2012. WA is still attracting a positive net interstate migration rate, however there were only 256 net interstate migrants to WA over the March quarter, down from a recent high of 3,395 over the March quarter of 2012. Net interstate migration into Tasmania has remained in negative territory since late 2010, however the trend is showing some constancy and is now approaching a neutral rate of interstate migration. The last time net interstate migration was substantially positive into Tasmania was between 2003 and 2004 when housing markets were booming.

Fairfield joins group of suburbs with million dollar median

The RP Data CoreLogic Home Value Index for September showed a minor easing in Melbourne dwelling values over the month and a moderate rise in the quarter. Dwelling values in Melbourne dropped by 0.8 per cent in the month of September. This will be welcomed by those looking to buy this spring and summer. The traditional rise in supply is clearly helping to address buyer demand. Over the quarter a 3.8 per cent rise has been recorded in house values and 7.2 per cent this year. Growth in values was concentrated in the first two months of the quarter. Analysis of property values by suburb over the quarter showed that the strongest growth in house values were in the inner east. Armadale saw a 25.4 per cent rise over the last year and similar growth was recorded in nearby Malvern East, Glen Iris and Camberwell. It is often the case that in an improving market the most expensive segment records the strongest increase in values. It was also interesting to note that Fairfield joined neighbouring suburb, Alphington, as a suburb with a median house value of in excess of a million dollars. Buyers who can’t afford Mont Albert or Balwyn are gravitating north of the Yarra. Unit values were stable with a 0.1 per cent rise in the month but they still showed very low growth this year with a 2.6 per cent rise in 2014 so far. Over 1,000 more homes were sold at auction this quarter than in the September quarter last year. The clearance rate was stable, 71.6 per cent compared to 71.4 per cent last year but there was a 17.6 per cent rise in auctions and 18 per cent rise in homes sold. Similar to the growth in values over the last year, this reflects an improving market and increased use of auctions. See full list of HOUSE results See full list of UNIT results Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Is this the biggest week ever in Melbourne real estate history?

This week will be a record for the Melbourne auction market with 1,641 auctions scheduled. This exceeds the previous record of 1,619 on the same weekend last year. Will it be the biggest auction week ever? That may depend on your perspective. After all, is ‘big’ defined as the volume of auctions, the number sold or the clearance rate? In the past 6 years there have been 45 weeks with more than 1,000 auctions while the vast majority in the past few years, for instance in both 2008 and 2009, there were just two. In recent times, the symbolic barrier of 1,000 has been regularly exceeded, 1,500 auctions is probably a more useful indicator of very high listings; it was only exceeded five times before this weekend. That occurred in the following instances; 1,619, in week ending 27 October 2014 1,616, in week ending 15 December 2014 1,598, in week ending 1 December 2013 1,535, in week ending 8 December 2013 1,530, in week ending 13 April 2014 A high volume of auctions is an interesting market indicator but for many the number sold is probably more important. In that case there has only been five weeks with more than 1,000 home sold at auction, they were; 1,163, in week ending 27 October 2013 1,085, in week ending 1 December 2013 1,050, in week ending 15 December 2013 029, in week ending 23 February 2014 1,021, in week ending 2 March 2014 The final statistic that may prove useful in analysing this week’s auctions is the top 5 clearance rates over the 45 weeks with more than 1,000 auctions. All are likely to be higher than what is recorded this week. 7% in week ending 28 March 2010 from 1,111 auctions 8% in week ending 28 February 2010 from 1,124 auctions 4% in week ending 13 December 2009 from 1,189 auctions 6% in week ending 29 November 2009 from 1,185 auctions 6% in week ending 2 March 2014 from 1,334 auctions Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

On trend result in capital city auctions

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 19 October 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 68.5 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 67.8 per cent last week and 70.4 per cent this time last year. This result is consistent with the years trend. The year to date clearance rate for capital cities was 68.3 per cent before this week In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 75.5 per cent was recorded compared to 71.9 per cent last week and 79.5 per cent last year. Despite the clearance rate not being higher than a year ago the auction market has improved with more homes being sold. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 68 per cent recorded compared to 70 per cent last week and 68.6 per cent this time last year. Concerns the auction market was beginning to weaken have not been added to this week. Next week will prove an interesting test with a record of around 1800 auctions scheduled. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 50.5 per cent was recorded compared to 48.8 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 50 per cent compared to 55.8 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 50 per cent was recorded and in Perth a clearance rate of 60 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Where to find falling rents in Melbourne

Growth in advertised median rents remains low across Melbourne but with significant localised variations. In the current market this makes it important for renters to shop around as much as possible. In the last year the median advertised rent on a weekly basis for a house in Melbourne has increased by 2.8 per cent to $447. In the last quarter it actually fell by a minor 0.1 per cent. In dollar terms, as many renters will assess the matter, the increase has been $13 per week. Over the last two years it has been $21 per week. To put this into context, over the same time in 2010 median advertised rents increased by $25 in one year alone. Pressure in the rental market has clearly eased and the market has shifted in favour of renters. At a suburban level, rents have fallen in many areas. Over the last year the largest falls in rents was recorded in our most expensive suburbs. For instance advertised rents in Middle Park have dropped 11.4 per cent, in Brighton by 10.5 per cent and Sandringham by 9.1 per cent. With median house rents of more than $700 per week that does not affect a large number of renters. Looking around the middle of the rental market for houses, between $400 and $500 per week, advertised rents have also fallen in many suburbs, but by a smaller amount. Eltham, Ascot Vale, Box Hill and Burwood are good examples. No increase has been recorded in Wantirna South, Thornbury, Oakleigh or Doncaster. Advertised rents have increased, but by less than the metropolitan wide number in Brunswick, Seddon and Blackburn South. At the other end of the spectrum, rents have risen in some suburbs. In Newport, Kensington, Chadstone, Flemington, Ashburton and Glen Waverly increases of 4 per cent or more have been recorded over the past 12 months. In the unit market the rapidly increasing supply restraining growth in values is also affecting the rental market. In the last year the median advertised rent on a weekly basis for a unit in Melbourne has increased 2.1 per cent to $398. In the middle of the unit market rents have fallen in Clifton Hill, Brunswick East, Windsor and Richmond. Clearly it is worth shopping around if you are renting. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Small rise in national clearance rate over last 4 weeks

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 19 October 2014 There are 2,638 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,209 auctions expected compared to 2,370 for the same period last year. With the exception of Adelaide, Canberra and Tasmania capital city clearance rates strengthened or remained stable across Australia when compared to the past 4 weeks and rest of the year. This improvement is generally small – for instance nationally the clearance rate rose from 68.2 per cent to 69.1 per cent. There are 1,043 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 1,123 last week and 1,124 this time last year. Based on settled sales this year the proportion of homes sold at auction has increased from 25 per cent a year ago to 30.8 per cent this year. Melbourne is on track for the highest overall volume and proportion of homes sold at auction ever. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 856 auctions compared to 918 last week and 913 for this week last year. The highest volume of auctions will be in Paddington with 18 expected, followed by Randwick and Strathfield with 14. Brisbane is expecting 134 auctions after 167 were held last week. Adelaide is expecting 98 auctions, compared to 115 last week. After a comparatively strong September the auction market has cooled in October, but still remains above trend for the year. Canberra has 47 auctions scheduled compared to 55 last week. Perth has 18 auctions compared to 25 last week There are 12 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in St Kilda Victoria with 23 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Mortgage demand still strong but easing

New data was released by the ABS last week on housing finance commitments which showed an ongoing slowdown in the pace of housing finance growth. The slower pace of growth in mortgages is another sign that housing market conditions are starting settle down. Excluding refinance loans, the number of owner occupier housing finance commitments was only 1.9% higher in August this year compared with August last year. The annual pace of owner occupier mortgage growth actually peaked in November last year at 16.1%. The slowdown in mortgage demand is also evident across the stronger investment sector of the mortgage market. Unfortunately, the ABS only publishes investor related housing finance data based on value rather than volume; however the slowdown is still evident. Growth in the value of investment loans has fallen to 27.6% from a recent high of 40% which was recorded in December last year. The value of owner occupier loans increased by a much lower 10.3% over the year, down from a recent peak of 20.3% in February this year. Growth of 27.6% over the past year for investment loans clearly still indicates that investor demand is racing along, however the downwards trend in the rate of growth should provide some reassurance that investor exuberance is slowly starting to dissipate.

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 19 October, 2014

There are 1,043 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1,124 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions is in St Kilda with 23 expected followed by Reservoir with 22 and Kew with 19. In the auction market the increased volume has shifted the market in favor of buyers with a lower clearance rate resulting from the almost 2,000 auctions held over the past fortnight. In the private sale market however sellers are seeing a peak in demand with lower days on market and reduced discounting prevalent. On a city wide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale tightened from 40 days to 37 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting fell from -5.1 per cent to -4.9 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 12 October: 70 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 19 October: 1,043 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 12 October: 37 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 12 October: -4.9 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.3 per cent higher in month ending 12 October seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Volumes rise, auction market improves

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 12 October 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 68.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 66.9 per cent last week and 72.5 per cent this time last year. Volumes are rising and are projected to reach a high in the last week of October in what will be a significant test for the market, especially in Melbourne with a new record likely to be set. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 75.8 per cent was recorded compared to 76.4 per cent last week. It is interesting to note that there have been 43 per cent more auctions this year than was the case last year, remarkably the clearance rate has not been significantly affected. It is also interesting to note than in another record, 27 per of homes sold this year have been at an auction compared to 17 per cent a year ago. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 67.2 per cent recorded compared to 69.1 per cent last week and 74 per cent this time last year. This was the 15th week with in excess of 1,000 auctions. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 54.2 per cent was recorded compared to 47.4 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 58.7 per cent compared to 53.7 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 56.4 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 33.3 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

In June quarter Boorandara sellers made $331m in profit

Over the second quarter of 2014 RP Data recorded 70,357 residential property re-sales nationally; of these, 9.0 per cent recorded a gross loss from the original purchase price. In Melbourne sellers recorded better results than those nationally. The report shows that 6.6 per cent of Melbourne homes re-sold over the June 2014 quarter sold at a loss, down from 8.4 per cent at the same time a year ago and lower than the 7.5 per cent recorded a quarter ago. This is due to two reasons, the impact of the Global Financial Crisis is reducing as it becomes more distant and secondly, the market is in a rising part of the cycle. For sellers the best news is that more than a third, 36.8 per cent, sold their home for at least double what they paid. In regional Victoria this was lower, at 28.4 per cent. The best outcomes for sellers were found in different parts of Melbourne. A stunning 97.9 per cent of sellers in the City of Whitehorse sold at a profit. On the other side of the city, in Hobsons Bay 97.4 per cent sold at a profit, followed by 97.1 per cent in the City of Monash, 97 per cent in the City of Knox and 96.8 per cent in Bayside. On the city’s fringe a remarkable statistic was uncovered, in Murrindindi every single seller made money in nominal terms. Of course the largest aggregate profit on the sales was made in the inner east due to the highest underlying land values. In the City of Boroondara owners made a total of $331m in profit over the June quarter. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Investor owned dwellings are heavily concentrated within the inner city apartment markets

A large proportion of housing demand is currently being driven by investment. Unfortunately in Australia we only receive information on owner occupier and investment ownership of properties every five years with the Census. Because of this RP Data’s Analytics team have built a set of rules to determine the probability that a home is owned by either an investor, owner occupier or the Government. The Reserve Bank has specifically noted that they have concerns with the high level of speculative investor activity, specifically in Sydney and Melbourne. The following thematic maps show the capital cities and measure the proportion of homes owned by investors across each region. The geographic trends in investor activity are very clear from these maps; investors are heavily concentrated within the inner city apartment markets. The below maps clearly highlight that investors overwhelmingly focus their attention on inner city unit markets. When the Reserve Bank raised concerns that there is too much investor activity taking place, it is also clear that the concentration risk is very much centred geographically within these inner city unit markets. If we did see investors pulling out the market ‘en masse’ or investor demand dry up for one reason or another over a short frame of time, then there is a heightened risk of declines in market value.

Sydney on track for above trend result

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 12 October 2014 There are 2,679 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,177 auctions expected compared to 2,229 for the same period last year. After this week there are only 10 weekends left this year for auctions. Of the capital cities it is clear that Sydney will exceed the national trend from a clearance rate perspective, Melbourne is in line with the national trend and the other capital cities are below trend. This broadly reflects the overall performance of their residential markets this year. There are 992 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week, compared to 912 last week and 1008 this time last year. Last week the lowest clearance rate in 9 weeks was recorded and provides evidence that the market is strong but not booming. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 850 auctions compared to 473 last week and 884 for this week last year. The use of auctions continues to rise in Sydney with 27 per cent of all residential sales by auction this year compared to 17 per cent last year. Brisbane is expecting 150 auctions after 117 were held last week. Paddington has the highest number of auctions with 7 expected, followed by Bardon and Sunnybank, each with 5. Adelaide is expecting 100 auctions, compared to 63 last week. Canberra has 53 auctions scheduled compared to 50 last week. Perth has 19 auctions compared to 23 last week. There are 5 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be in Mount Waverly Victoria with 19 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 12 October, 2014

There are 992 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 1008 for the same time last year the fourteenth week with over 1,000 auction this year . The highest volume of auctions will be in Mount Waverly with 19 expected. After a few weeks where sellers were holding the upper hand, last week showed that they still need to ensure that their sale price expectations are not too high. While the Melbourne market is healthy, it is recording more moderate growth that in the two previous upswings in 2007 and 2010. September quarter property values showed that the strongest growth in house values on a suburb basis were in the inner east. Armadale saw a 25.4 per cent rise over the last year and similar growth was recorded in nearby Malvern East, Glen Iris and Camberwell. It is often the case that in an improving market the most expensive segment records the strongest increase in values. It was also interesting to note that Fairfield joined its neighbor, Alphington, as a suburb with a median house value of in excess of a million dollars. Buyers who can’t afford Mont Albert or Balwyn are gravitating north of the Yarra. On a city wide basis, the time on market results for houses sold at private sale rose from 39 days to 40 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting fe;; from -5.3 per cent to -5.1 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 5 October: 69.1 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 12 October: 992 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 5 October: 40 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 5 October: -5.1 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.9 per cent higher in month ending 5 October seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

RP Data National Auction Comment; Week ending 5 October, 2014

A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 65.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 70.9 per cent last week and 69.3 per cent this time last year. From an overall perspective this year’s market is clearly stronger than last year. So far this year there have been 68,651 auctions, 30.5 per cent more than this time last year. Over the same time an additional 12,274 homes have been sold at auction, 35.5 per cent more. Despite a stronger overall performance and more recently, five very strong weeks, the national clearance rate fell this week, primarily due to softening in demand in Melbourne. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 77.4 per cent was recorded compared to 76.9 per cent last week. Volumes took a temporary drop this week due to the long weekend and NRL Grand Final. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 65.6 per cent recorded compared to 77.3 per cent last week and 71.3 per cent this time last year. This weeks result provides more evidence that the Melbourne market does have limits and sellers cannot have unrealistic expectations. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 52 per cent was recorded compared to 48.9 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 63.4 per cent compared to 65.6 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 25 per cent was recorded. In Perth a clearance rate of 16.7 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

1900 auctions expected across Australia this week

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 5 October 2014 There are 1,900 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,455 auctions expected compared to 1,501 for the same period last year. Volumes are again affected by sporting events, this time in Sydney. The impact is less than in Melbourne last week as the grand final for the NRL is not on a Saturday afternoon. If a national clearance rate in excess of 70 per cent is achieved this week it will the first time there have been six consecutive weeks over 70 per cent in the last year. Prior to that the last time that was the case was in 2009. This reflects the healthy selling conditions in the main auction markets nationally. There are 812 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week compared to 112 last week and 866 this time last year. Over 1,000 more homes were sold at auction than in the September quarter last year. The clearance rate was stable, 71.6 per cent compared to 71.4 per cent last year but there was a 17.6 per cent rise in auctions and 18 per cent rise in homes sold. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 410 auctions compared to 933 last week and 398 for this week last year. The highest volume of auctions will be in Maroubra where 10 are expected, followed by 8 in Bellevue Hill. Brisbane is expecting 92 auctions after 179 last week. Adelaide is expecting 61 auctions, compared to 73 last week. Canberra has 49 auctions scheduled compared to 51 last week. Perth has 22 auctions compared to 6 last week. There are 11 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, highest volume of auctions will be in St Kilda Victoria with 19 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

August 2014 building approvals

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released building approvals data for August 2014 earlier today. At a headline level, dwelling approvals were 3.0% higher over the month and are now 14.5% year on year. With 16,810 approvals over the month there is clearly a strong level of residential development activity with monthly approvals just -5.0% lower than their recent peak. Of the 16,810 dwelling approvals in recorded over the month of August, 9,401 were for houses and the remaining 7,409 were mulit-unit dwellings typically apartments . Over the month, house approvals fell by -1.4% while unit approvals rose by 9.2%. Year-on-year, house approvals are 12.6% higher while unit approvals are up 17.1%. As the chart shows, the six month trend indicates a slowing of dwelling approval numbers and it also shows that monthly movements in unit approvals tend to be much more volatile. Also remember that a multi-unit development is more risky than developing a single house and ultimately less likely to ultimately be constructed. Focussing on dwelling approvals on an annual basis we have seen more house and unit approvals than ever before over the 12 months to August 2014. Over the 12 month period there were 197,571 dwelling approvals, of which 111,020 were for houses and 86,552 were units. The annual number of approvals has increased by 19.2% over the past year. Although approvals have surged, as the chart shows it is largely due to a significant lift in unit approvals. Although the number of unit approvals over the past year was at a record high, house approvals are still -6.8% lower than their previous peak over the year to July 2010 and -21.2% lower than their all-time high of 140,832 over the year to April 1989. Historically, units have been much less likely to move from approval to construction. Units also tend to be much more likely to be owned by investors than houses. With the Reserve Bank flagging that deliberations are ongoing into the introduction of macroprudential policies to slow the level of investor activity in the housing market, there is potentially an even bigger than normal risk that these units won’t make it to completion. Across the combined capital cities, there was an all-time high of 147,122 dwellings approved for construction over the 12 months to August 2014. The number of capital city dwelling approvals has increased by 21.9% over the past year. Over the year there were, 71,662 approvals for houses and 75,460 unit approvals with house approvals up 20.6% and unit approvals 23.2% higher. Much like the national results you can see that unit approvals are at their higher levels while house approvals are only just approaching their previous peak levels. Across the individual capital cities, Brisbane has recorded the greatest increase in dwelling approvals over the year 41.8% followed by: Perth 24.9% , Adelaide 24.0% and Sydney 23.3% . Dwelling approvals are lower over the year in Darwin -6.8% and Canberra -6.4% while Melbourne 16.3% and Hobart 19.4% have recorded only moderate rises in dwelling approvals. Despite certain cities recording significant rises in dwelling approvals, Sydney and Melbourne have accounted for more than 57% of all capital city dwelling approvals over the past year. With 26,123 dwelling approvals over the past year, approvals in Perth are at a record high while Brisbane approvals are just shy of their record high. A key driver of the overall increase in dwelling approvals has been the rising prominence of the unit market. Over the past year, the increase in unit approvals has been greater than the increase in house approvals in Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth. Although unit approvals have recorded greater increases in these cities, there has been a substantial decline in unit approvals across Hobart and falls in both Darwin and Canberra. With more than half of all capital city dwelling approvals for units as opposed to houses, all individual capital cities except for Adelaide 31.8% , Perth 25.9% and Hobart 7.0% are seeing a majority of approvals for units. In Sydney, 67.7% of dwelling approvals were for units over the past year, elsewhere 53.0% were for units in Melbourne, 55.9% in Brisbane, 63.2% in Darwin and 57.9% in Canberra. Sydney has consistently approved more units than houses since 1993 and Darwin has consistently approved more units than houses since 2003, while across the other cities it is a relatively new phenomenon. Melbourne has only been approving more units than houses since mid-2012, in Brisbane it has occurred since mid-2013 and in Canberra since mid-2010. Of course there is increasing levels of demand for units but particularly in Melbourne and Brisbane the number of units in the pipeline is largely untested in the market. Furthermore, units tend to be more appealing to the investor market rather than owner occupiers. While demand may currently be strong it remains to be seen whether there is enough investor demand to satisfy all of the supply in the pipeline. Dwelling approvals remain at a very high level and with the rate of population growth slowing it is encouraging to see that supply is finally responding. With their lower price point compared to houses and superior rental returns no doubt we are seeing a rising level of demand for units, particularly in inner city markets. Of course the RBA has raised concerns about the level of investment lending which is most prominent for inner city units. If controls are introduced to slow the level of investment there may be an adverse impact on demand and subsequently values of inner city units, particularly new inner city units which are a strong target from the investment segment of the market.

Small drop in values gives Melbourne buyers breathing room

The RP Data CoreLogic Home Value Index for September showed a minor easing in Melbourne dwelling values that did not change the trend for 2014. Dwelling values in Melbourne dropped by 0.8 per cent in September.This will be welcomed by those looking to buy this spring and summer. The traditional rise in supply is clearly helping to address buyer demand. The trend for 2014 is still strong with a 6.7 per cent rise in dwelling values making Melbourne second only to Sydney across capital cities. House values fell by 1 per cent tempering the very strong rises in some recent months at just the right time for many active in the market. Over the quarter a 3.8 per cent rise has been recorded and 7.2 per cent this year. The median price of a house based on sales settled so far in the September quarter is $590,000. Unit values were stable with a 0.1 per cent rise in the month but they still showed very low growth this year with a 2.6 per cent rise in 2014 so far. Over 1,000 more homes were sold at auction than in the September quarter last year. The clearance rate was stable, 71.6 per cent compared to 71.4 per cent last year but there was a 17.6 per cent rise in auctions and 18 per cent rise in homes sold. Similar to the growth in values over the last year this reflects an improving market and increased use of auctions. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

RP Data Auction Market, Melbourne; Week ending 5 October, 2014

There are 812 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 866 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions will be in St Kilda with 19 followed by Glen Waverley and Mount Waverley, both with 17. This week will see the busiest period of the annual auction market begin. The high volumes do have an impact on the market. Last year there were 13,658 auctions held between the end of September and Christmas and a lower clearance rate was recorded than in the preceding 8 months. On a city wide basis the time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell from 41 days to 39 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting rose from -5.2 per cent to -5.3 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 28 September: 77.2 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 5 October: 812 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 28 September: 39 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 28 September: -5.3 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.4 per cent higher in month ending 28 September seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Top 5 for Ballarat residential real estate sales during 2013-2014 financial year

With the vast majority of homes sold in the last financial year now settled, it is possible to calculate some of the key numbers in the Ballarat market. Over the year a total of $639m was spent on houses in the City of Ballarat and $68m on units across 1,942 house sales and 281 unit sales. There were 12 million dollar house sales – the median value of a house was $301,001. The median house value rose by 7.1 per cent compared to 7.9 per cent in Melbourne. Largest growth in median house values by suburb; Golden Point, Soldiers Hill, Black Hill, Redan and Mount Pleasant Most house sales by suburb; Wendouree, Sebastopol, Alfredton, Ballarat East and Delacombe Most expensive suburbs by median house values; Lake Wendouree, Lake Gardens, Invermay Park, Mount Helen and Buninyong Most affordable suburbs by median house values; Sebastopol, Wendouree, Redan Mount Pleasant and Ballarat East Highest spend on houses; Alfredton $64m , Wendouree $48m , Sebastopol $42m , Ballarat Central $41m and Lake Wendouree $40m Suburbs with million dollar house sales; Lake Wendouree, Ballarat Central and Newington Suburbs with the highest proportion of houses advertised for sale; Ballarat Central, Miners Rest, Alfredton, Mount Clear and Newington Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

National auction market – 5 weeks over 70%

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 28 September 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 72 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 70.8 per cent last week and 73.5 per cent this time last year. This is the fifth consecutive week where the national clearance rate has exceeded 70 per cent. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 78.5 per cent was recorded compared to 78 per cent last week. This weeks result is above the year to date trend of 75.2 per cent. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 78.5 per cent recorded compared to 72.1 per cent last week. It needs to be noted that there was a very low volume this week. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 50 per cent was recorded compared to 38.9 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 67.4 per cent compared to 68.4 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 41.2 per cent was recorded. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Auctions halved by AFL Grand Final

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 28 September 2014 There are 1,560 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,210 auctions expected compared to 1,243 for the same period last year, just under half compared to last week’s 2,530. With the AFL Grand Final on this Saturday in Melbourne, real estate agents generally advise sellers to avoid holding an auction. This also applies to Perth and Adelaide to a lesser degree. It’s unlikely that the AFL will have a negative impact on the spring market as volumes will increase again next week. There are 72 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week compared to 1,221 last week and 92 this time last year. The busiest period of the residential real estate year commences next week and will run through until the third weekend in December. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 862 auctions compared to 883 last week and 891 for this week last year. Volumes may be similar to comparable weeks but that understates the significant rise in auctions this year. There have been 26,111 in Sydney this year, 8,191 more than this time last year at the same time the overall clearance rate has risen from 71.5 to 75.2 per cent. Brisbane is expecting 149 auctions after 154 last week. Adelaide is expecting 68 auctions, compared to 129 last week. Canberra has 47 auctions scheduled compared to 80 last week. Perth has 6 auctions compared to 47 last week. There are 13 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in the Sydney suburb of Maroubra where 12 are expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 28 September 2014

There are 72 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 92 for the same time last year. Auction numbers are low this week due to the AFL Grand Final. Conditions in the private sale market are becoming more competitive with homes taking fewer days to sell and a lower vendor discount. Recent data shows that all of the top 10 suburbs when ranked by time on market are in the eastern suburbs. Rowville had the lowest number of days on market followed by Blackburn North, Croydon, Wantirna South and Vermont South. On a city wide basis the time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell from 44 days to 41 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting fell from -5.4 per cent to -5.2 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 28 September: 72.1 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 28 September: 72 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 21 September: 41 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 21 September: -5.2 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 2 per cent higher in month ending 21 September seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The ‘sweet spot’ of Melbourne real estate

Real estate is a medium to long term investment and even though there is considerable focus on day to day and month on month changes, a review of activity over the last decade can be very illustrative and can be especially useful in revealing the areas of sustained strong demand. The period of 2004 to 2014 covers a very volatile time in the local market and thereby evens out the fluctuations over that time and roughly approximates the time most people owned a home for; this is therefore a realistic time for comparison. Ranking Melbourne suburbs by sales value growth since 2004 shows a clutch of 4 neighbouring suburbs where a increase in price has outstripped the rest of the city. These four suburbs are: Mont Albert, Mont Albert North, Balywn and Balwyn North. Each have recorded a compounding annual growth rate over the past decade of 9.2, 8.8, 8.8 and 8.7 per cent respectively. As evidenced by the rapid increase in sale prices, these suburbs have been in high demand from buyers for some time. They also outstripped the city-wide growth rate of 5.7 per cent for houses. And in the last year 8 of 10 houses have sold for more than a million dollars. Past performance is no guarantee of future performance so it is not time to rush out and buy a home in these suburbs, even if the million-dollar price was affordable. Twelve other suburbs also recorded an annual compounding growth of 8 per cent or greater, half of which were not in the eastern suburbs. These were Macleod and Alphington in the north-east, McKinnon, Elsternwick and Albert Park in the south and the newer suburb of Doreen. A change in sale price in Doreen reflects changes in the price of new homes as opposed to established homes and are less representative of market movements. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

September 2014 Reserve Bank Financial Stability Review

The Reserve Bank released their bi-annual Financial Stability Review FSR earlier today. From a housing market perspective it makes for very interesting reading with the RBA noting that ‘the composition of housing and mortgage markets is becoming unbalanced, with new lending to investors being out of proportion to rental housing’s share of the housing stock.’ The RBA also states, ‘The Bank is discussing with APRA, and other members of the Council of Financial Regulators, additional steps that might be taken to reinforce sound lending practices, particularly for lending to investors.’ The FSR notes that household risk appetite continues to rise with households more willing to take on debt. Of course, with interest rates so low and subsequently both deposit and mortgage rates so low, there is little benefit in keeping money in a savings account so investors are turning their attention to the housing market. The FSR does highlight that the growth in home values is within the larger cities Sydney and Melbourne . Further, the FSR notes, ‘The apparent increase in the use of interest-only loans by both owner-occupiers and investors might also be consistent with increasingly speculative motives behind current housing demand.’ You may recall that APRA data showed a record high 43.2% of new loans over the June 2014 quarter were interest-only, up from 39.4% the previous quarter. The RBA notes that excess investor demand can exacerbate the housing price cycle and increase the potential for prices to fall later. They note that these risks are macroeconomic in nature rather than direct risks to financial institutions. While this may be true, with most investors borrowing from financial institutions, were these investors in a position where they had no choice but to sell at a time in which prices were falling, the risk to the banking sector of loss given default would also likely rise. The document also notes that the willingness of households to take on more debt is resulting in a rise in the debt-to-income ratio. It notes that although it is up a little over the past 6 months, it is still in its range of the past 8 years at around 150%. It notes that this ratio is historically high and any increase in household indebtedness would be taking place from an already high base. What this commentary fails to note is that the last update to this data was in March 2014 and at that time, the housing debt-to-income ratio rose to a record high 135.8%. With investment activity and home values continuing to rise since March, this ratio is now likely to be even higher. Although household debt levels are high, the document notes that the aggregate mortgage buffer balances in mortgage offset and redraw facilities has risen to around 15% of outstanding balances, which is equivalent to more than 2 years of scheduled repayments at current interest rates. Focussing specifically on the investor cohort of the housing market, the RBA notes that the momentum in investor activity has been concentrated in Sydney and to a lesser extent Melbourne. In New South Wales, investor housing loan approvals are almost 90% higher than they were 2 years ago and in Melbourne they are 50% higher over the same period. As a share of all housing finance commitments nationally they are back around previous peaks. At the same time the level of owner occupier demand has slowed over the past 6 months. The document notes that, ‘Strong investor demand can be a sign of speculative excess, with the risk that additional speculative demand can amplify the cycle in housing prices and increase the potential for prices to fall later. This is particularly the case if that demand is largely based on unrealistic expectations of future price growth, perhaps extrapolated from recent experience.’ In simple terms that means that too much lending to investors is potentially risky for the market and may result in price falls later, particularly if investors are entering the market expecting current price growth to continue. You only have to look at Sydney as an example. The last time investor activity in New South Wales spiked to similar albeit lower levels to those currently, home values in Sydney began to fall and took 5.5 years to surpass their previous peak. The report also notes that an increase in investor speculation can also potentially lead to an oversupply of new housing supply. The report notes that we are a long way from this occurring however, there are certain pockets where this is a risk, most notably inner city unit markets in Melbourne. The secondary risk here is that if there were too many smaller investment units built, whilst they may initially sell off-the-plan they might be much more difficult to sell in the secondary market. The FSR notes ‘Despite the activity and housing price inflation in the Sydney and Melbourne property markets, rental yields have not declined to a significant extent and vacancy rates in these cities remain fairly low However, rental yields may come under pressure if the momentum in housing price inflation continues. Households should therefore be mindful of the risks when making investment property decisions in these conditions.’ This is another statement that is somewhat difficult to reconcile. The RBA has correctly pointed out that price growth and investment activity is strongest in Sydney in Melbourne. In these two cities, rental yields have fallen over the past year. In Sydney, gross rental yields were 4.2% a year ago and in Melbourne they were 3.6%, across these cities they are currently recorded at 3.8% and 3.3% respectively. RP Data has been tracking yields since December 1995, the lowest they have been over that time in Sydney were 3.5% and they are currently at a record low in Melbourne. Overall it is important to note that the RBA is highlighting some growing risks in the residential housing market, specifically within Sydney and Melbourne. Note that some of these risks were highlighted six months ago in the previous FSR and these risks have increased since that time. It is interesting to note that the RBA has stated they are in discussions with APRA, and other members of the Council of Financial Regulators to see how they can reinforce sound lending practices. This suggests that Australian regulators may be seriously considering the introduction of macroprudential tools which place limits on higher risk lending. If the New Zealand experience is anything to go by where the RBNZ applied LVR limits on the lending sector , the introduction of macroprudential ‘speed humps’ are likely to have the effect of slowing housing market conditions and speculative demand, however the New Zealand policies were also accompanied by rising interest rates which arguably had a more substantial effect on the market slowdown.

Is there a shift in attitudes towards home ownership underway?

The state government recently delivered the final installment of its stamp duty cut for most first home buyers. Stamp duty is a significant impost on the purchase of a house, coming at a time when buyers, and in particular first home buyers, need every cent they can get. As stamp duty bills are generally unwelcome it is surprising to see the change in the market. When the first 20 per cent cut was made in July 2011 first home buyers accounted for 17.2 per cent of all dwellings financed in Victoria. According to the ABS there were 2,036 dwellings financed for first home buyers that month. Fast forward to the most recent housing finance data, for July this year and the proportion fell to 11.3 per cent, or 1,691 in raw numbers. Oddly the state has given first homer buyers an effective saving of $10,985 on a $500,000 home, when interest rates are at record lows and they appear to have decided, in unprecedented numbers, to stop buying. When the initial fall in first home buyer activity occurred, in July last year, it seemed a temporary reaction to the ending of the $7,000 First Home Owners Grant. Since then the value of the duty cut has grown to exceed the value of the old grant for most first home buyers. Since 1991 first home buyers have accounted for 21.5 per cent of all loans in Victoria, over the last year it has been 12.2 per cent, nearly half. July was an all time low at 11.3 per cent. Interestingly Victoria is not alone. In NSW first home buyers accounted for 17.6 per of dwellings financed since 1991 and 7.6 per cent in the last year. In Queensland the long term average of 20 per cent has also plummeted, to 11.4 per cent in the past year. Given different incentives apply across the nation and first home buyer activity has been significantly higher in other times of rising prices, with higher interest rates, it suggests that something else is going on. Affordability issues are a legitimate concern but the question must be asked, is this significant drop in first home buyer activity part of a change in the home buying aspirations of young people in Victoria and what will it mean for the structure of the residential market in 10 years time? After all the progression of first home buyers through the market, as they sell the first home to upgrade to the second is an important factor in real estate. It helps supply the market with comparatively affordable homes and provides buyers for more expensive ones. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

National clearance rate of 69.2% recorded over the weekend

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 21 September 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 69.2 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 72.3 per cent last week and 73.1 per cent this time last year. The capital cities auction market has clearly lifted since winter, primarily due to strong demand in Sydney and Melbourne to a lessor extent. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 76.9 per cent was recorded compared to 78.4 per cent last week. Volumes continue to rise and are expected to double the lows of winter soon thereby increasing choice for buyers. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 69.3 per cent recorded compared to 73.4 per cent last week. Spring has started strongly but it is worth noting that due to significant rises in stock levels the auction market shifted towards buyers this time last year after the grand final. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 41.4 per cent was recorded compared to 48.2 per cent last week. The low clearance rate compared to the larger capital cities masks the improvement, a 75 per cent rise in homes sold at auction, compared to two years ago. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 69.1 per cent compared to 64.3 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 57.8 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 52 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Auction numbers rise 12% in capital cities this week

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 21 September 2014 There are 2,757 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 2,339 auctions expected compared to 2,109 for the same period last year and 2,080 last week. Auctions are occurring across 1,130 different suburbs with 73 per cent of those auctions for houses. Conditions are favouring sellers in the main capital city auction markets this spring with the increasing number of homes on the market finding buyers. There are 1,090 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week compared to 1,018 last week and 984 this time last year. This will be the 13th week this year with in excess of 1,000 auctions in Melbourne. Last week’s clearance rate showed that demand is strong enough to absorb multiple weeks of high volumes. In Sydney RP Data is expecting 846 auctions compared to 743 last week and 766 for this week last year. The clearance rate over the last four weeks, 78.6 per cent, is marginally below the same time last year, 79.9 per cent, however with 14 per cent more auctions the overall market remains strong. Brisbane is expecting 138 auctions after 134 last week and has recorded 8 per cent more homes sold over the past four weeks compared to the same time last year. Adelaide is expecting 124 auctions, compared to 89 last week. Canberra has 78 auctions scheduled compared to 51 last week. Spring is proving to be strong with more homes being offered for sale at auction and more being sold. Perth has 45 auctions compared to 34 last week. There are 15 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in the Sydney suburb of Mosman where 26 are expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 21 September, 2014

There are 1090 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 984 for the same time last year. The highest volume of auctions this week is in Reservoir with 24 expected followed by 23 in Hawthorn and 22 in Brighton. Last week was the 12th time this year where in excess of 1,000 auctions were recorded; the highest for year was 1,510 in mid April. In 2013 there were 11 weeks with more than 1,000 auctions and in 2012 there was 4. Given an increase in auctions as a popular mechanism for selling, the prevalence of 1,000 plus auctions each week is much higher than ever before, making weeks of 1,500 plus a more significant indicator of confidence from vendors. There were 4 weeks with more than 1,500 auctions last year, all after the AFL Grand Final. There is no reason this won’t be repeated this year. Time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell from 45 days to 44 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting fell from -5.6 per cent to -5.4 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 14 September: 73.4 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 21 September: 1090 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 14 September: 44 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 14 September: -5.4 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.4 per cent higher in month ending 14 September seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Why are home values still rising?

According to the RP Data CoreLogic Home Value Index, combined capital city home values have increased by 10.9% over the 12 months and by 18.7% over the current growth phase. With many economic indicators heading in the wrong direction it seems counter-intuitive that home values would continue to rise as strongly as they are. The answer to why home values continue to rise can partly be explained by the level of equity sitting in our homes. The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS estimated that as at June 2014 there were 9,366,800 residential dwellings across the country. Over the 12 months to June 2014, RP Data estimated that there were 484,000 dwellings sold across the nation. Based on these figures, just 5.2% of total dwelling stock sold over the past year. Equity is difficult to truly calculate as there are no regular statistics available on home equity levels, as you’d imagine the banks hold this data quite tight. So whilst we can’t determine the reduction in the initial borrowings over time, we can determine how much home values have increased over time which is a key component of how much wealth has been accumulated in a property. Over the past two decades, the level of value growth across Australia’s capital cities has been strong. As deregulation of financial markets has taken place lending for residential housing has ramped up significantly. Subsequently, the cost of housing has risen and those who own a home or have a mortgage have seen a large rise in their equity. Since national home values reached a low point in December 2008 after a cumulative -6.1% fall from March to December of 2008, there has been a significant divergence in the level of capital growth across individual capital cities. From the end of 2008 to August 2014, total home value increases have been much greater in Sydney and Melbourne than across the other capital cities. This is by virtue of value rises of 27.2% and 19.5% over the current growth cycle as well as quite strong value rises throughout the 2009 and 2010 growth cycle. The impact of this growth in home values means that even those who have only recently purchased in Sydney and Melbourne, say in 2009 or 2010, have already seen a large increase in the value of their home. As a result, some are using this equity to purchase investment properties, others will use the equity to upgrade into more suitable housing for their needs and of course others will have different or no strategies for the equity. Housing finance data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS shows that investment lending for new loans this excludes refinances has recently hit record levels while first home buyer demand is at an all-time low. The two driving segments of the housing market are investors and subsequent buyers those upgrading or downgrading their principal place of residence . But why are they choosing property, why now and why Sydney and Melbourne? Standard variable mortgage rates are currently recorded at 5.95%. Outside of an eight month period between February 2009 and September 2009, standard variable mortgage rates haven’t been lower than they currently are since the early 1970’s. Over recent years, discounted variable mortgage rates have become much more prevalent in the mortgage market. Currently, discounted variable mortgage rates are 85 basis points lower 5.1% than standard mortgage rates. With the banks competing heavily for mortgage business currently a large proportion of borrowers are able to get that discounted rate or even lower on their home loan. The low interest rates also have an impact on investment decisions by making certain other asset classes less attractive. With official interest rates sitting at 2.5% the amount of interest for cash sitting in the bank is very little. According to data from the Reserve Bank RBA in August, a three year term deposit with $10,000 or more receives just 3.65% interest per annum. When you consider that inflation is at 3.0%, the real returns from a term deposit are miserly. The relatively low cost of servicing a mortgage currently and the low returns on risk-free investment is attracting increasing investor activity to the housing market. The historical performance of an asset should not be used as guidance to the future returns. Although this is the case and a disclaimer many use when providing investment advice, the historic returns from residential housing have been impressive and difficult to argue with. Obviously many people believe that these returns will continue into the future. It is important to note that housing market returns have generally been much more moderate following the financial crisis than they were prior to the crisis. In fact on an annual basis home values have fallen over three of the past seven calendar years 2008, 2011 and 2012 . With returns so low amongst risk-free investments, investors have clearly shifted their focus to slightly riskier asset-classes such as residential housing. In particular the focus has been centred on our two largest cities, Sydney and Melbourne. Although housing has proven to be a low-risk investment class over recent times it is not a one-way bet. Values are rising on the back of increased competition for stock however, with values rising at some point a proportion of the market will no longer be able to afford the homes available for sale. At some point in the future who knows when growth in values will slow and interest rates will increase. We are also seeing a very strong supply-side response with a record high number of dwelling approvals over the past 12 months. Additional supply should ease some of the upwards pressure on values. It has already resulted in a moderation of rental growth, with rental pressures subsiding we may also see more potential buyers choosing to remain in the rental market rather than purchase their own owner-occupied property. When value growth slows or starts to fall we may see investors shift from housing to other more liquid asset classes. As interest rates rise, servicing the mortgage becomes more expensive. The point being, housing has generally provided solid capital gains over the past two decades and growth conditions across Sydney and Melbourne are currently spectacular, however the market moves in cycles and the growth being seen in Sydney and Melbourne will eventually transition to less expensive markets that show stronger fundamentals for capital gains.

RP Data 2013-2014 financial year top 5 for Melbourne residential real estate

With a vast majority of homes sold in the last financial year now settled, it is possible to calculate some of the key numbers in the Melbourne market. Suburbs with the lowest number of house sales: Narre Warren East, Gilderoy, Sherbrooke, Tremont and Gruyere. Each only recorded one sale Suburbs with the biggest spend by house buyers; Brighton $805m , Glen Waverly $613m , Kew $592m , Toorak $576m and Balwyn North $502m Suburbs with the biggest spend by apartment buyers; Melbourne $649m , Southbank $378m , South Yarra $353m , Docklands $346m and Brighton $307m Suburb with the most house sales over $2m, Brighton with 147 Suburbs with the largest house blocks sold; Park Orchards, Belgrave South, Kalorama, The Patch and Sassafras Suburbs with the largest increase in sale price for houses: Ashburton, Balwyn North, Fairfield, Kew East and Balwyn Municipalities with the largest increase in sale price for houses: Monash, Glen Eira, Manningham, Whitehorse and Yarra Municipalities with the least increase in sale price for houses: Hume, Cardinia, Mornington Peninsula, Nillumbik and Brimbank Suburbs with the least increase in median advertised rents for houses: Brighton, South Melbourne, Middle Park, Sandringham and Armadale Suburbs with the largest increase in median advertised rents for houses: Balwyn, Caulfield South, Fitzroy North, Beaumaris and Carlton Suburbs with the highest proportion of houses advertised for sale: Mount Eliza, Taylors Hill, Point Cook, Pakenham and Mount Martha Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Capital city auctions deliver healthy returns

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 14 September 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 70.8 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 74.1 per cent last week and 72 per cent this time last year. This week will have added to the already substantial growth in auction volumes this year across capital cities. Prior to this week there had been 61,056 auctions in capital cities, 33.6 per cent more than the 45,696 held over the same time last year. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 78.3 per cent was recorded compared to 80.1 per cent last week. Last week was only the 5th time in the past 5 years a clearance rate of over 80 per cent was achieved and this week has returned a similar result. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 70.5 per cent recorded on the first week with over 1,000 auctions for the spring season compared to 76.6 per cent last week. Higher volumes have translated into more sales, so far this year there have been 5 homes sold at auction for every 4 last year. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 49.4 per cent was recorded compared to 44.7 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 62.7 per cent compared to 68.8 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 52 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 43.8 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Rising national clearance rate

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 14 September 2014 There are 2,289 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,904 auctions expected compared to 2,073 for the same period last year. The national clearance rate has averaged 71.8 per cent over the past four weeks and is displaying a clear rising trend with increases recorded in each of the past three weeks. With stock increasing and over the next fortnight the pattern for spring will be clear by the AFL Grand Final in the week ending 28 September. Over the past four weeks the Melbourne auction market has recorded the highest clearance rate in just under a year with 73.5 per cent of 3,258 homes selling. There are 927 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week compared to 872 last week and 975 this time last year. The Sydney clearance rate exceeded 80 per cent last week for only the fifth time in five years last week. This week RP Data is expecting 684 auctions compared to 705 last week and 805 for this week last year. The highest number is expected in Turramurra. Canberra has 45 auctions scheduled compared to 69 last week. Brisbane is expecting 118 auctions after 128 last week. The highest volume of auctions in any one Queensland suburb is found outside Brisbane with 5 expected in Broadbeach Waters, Buderim and Noosa Heads. Adelaide is expecting 83 auctions, compared to 86 last week. Perth has 29 auctions , the same number as last week. There are 11 auctions scheduled in Tasmania.Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in the Melbourne suburb of Prahran where 19 are expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 14 September, 2014

There are 927 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 975 for the same time last year. The highest number of auctions is expected in the Prahran where 19 are scheduled. As the market enters spring there are fewer homes on the market than a year ago with 28,988 active listings in Melbourne and 54,619 in Victoria. Twelve months ago the comparable number was 32,454 in Melbourne and 58,664 in Victoria. This is a positive sign as it highlights a more active market with more buyers. The extent that this translates into higher prices will depend in many ways on the volume of new listings. Thankfully for buyers the number of homes being newly listed for sale is rising compared to last year. Time on market results for houses sold at private sale fell from 47 days to 45 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting rose from -5.3 per cent to -5.6 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 7 September: 76.7 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 14 September: 927 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 7 September: 45 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 7 September: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are -1.1 per cent lower in month ending 7 September seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Investor demand for housing reaches an historic high

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released housing finance data for July 2014 earlier today. The headline result was the 0.3% rise in owner occupier housing finance commitments over the month. In my opinion, a more significant result was the 6.8% monthly rise in investment lending. Investment lending had shown signs of slowing over recent months but has come surging back in July. Looking at the value of housing finance commitments over the month, the total value increased by 2.7% in July 2.6% excluding refinances . Owner occupier refinance commitments increased by 3.1%, owner occupier new mortgage commitments fell by -1.3% and investment finance commitments increased by 6.8%. Year-on-year, the total value of finance commitments has increased by 17.4% or 17.2% excluding refinances. The year-on-year increase in owner occupier refinance commitments was 18.6%, new home loan commitments to owner occupiers were 7.1% higher and lending to investors surged 29.6%. In the current climate, subsequent purchasers and investors are occupying the majority of housing finance demand. Looking at the same data but focussing on the proportion of total lending reconfirms the high level of lending to investors and subsequent purchasers. In July, 41.4% of total mortgage lending was for new loans to owner occupiers, 18.3% was to owner occupiers for refinances and 40.3% was to investors. The 41.4% of total commitments to owner occupiers excluding refinances was the lowest proportion of lending to this cohort on record. Conversely, at 40.3% of all mortgage lending, investment lending was at its highest proportion since October 2003 and second highest ever . If you remove refinances from the equation 49.3% of lending was to investors which was a record high. Data focussing on the number of loans to owner occupiers shows there were 52,251 owner occupier commitments in July. The number of commitments rose by 0.3% over the month however, it has recorded only a moderate 1.7% rise year-on-year. Loans for refinancing purposes increased by 2.4% over the month and 6.6% year-on-year compared to a -0.7% fall in non-refinanced loans over the month and a -0.7% fall over the year. This data and the data previously detailed suggest that demand from owner occupiers for new loans has slowed with investors and refinances currently driving activity. The owner occupiers that commit to finance overwhelmingly commit to finance for the purposes of purchasing an established dwelling. In July, there were 25,469 new owner occupier loan s excluding refinances for the purchase of established dwellings, 6,157 for construction of new dwellings and 2,871 for the purchase of new dwellings. Over the month, established dwelling commitments were down -0.7%, construction of dwellings were -1.3% lower and purchase of new dwellings was 0.5% higher. Year-on-year, commitments for the purchase of established dwellings are -3.6% lower while commitments for construction are 16.4% lower and commitments for purchase of new are -5.1% lower. The number of housing finance commitments by first home buyers remains stuck at near record low levels. In July, there were 6,717 housing finance commitments to first home buyers, which accounted for 12.2% of total owner occupier commitments over the month. The number of first home buyer housing finance commitments is -2.2% lower over the month and -15.7% lower year-on-year. While the number of commitments by first home buyers is lower over the year, the average loan size has risen by 7.0%. First home buyers largely remain on the sideline in the current market as investors and subsequent purchasers capture much of the mortgage demand. Based on current mortgage rates, fixed rate loans generally have a lower interest rate than discounted variable loans. This is not necessarily unusual however, housing finance data showed that there were just 7,553 owner occupier finance commitments or 13.7% of all owner occupier finance commitments on a fixed rate in July. The number of fixed rate loans has been trending lower after most recently peaking at 17.4% of all mortgage commitments in November 2013. The RP Data Mortgage Index RMI which measures mortgage activity across RP Data’s proprietary platforms recorded a fall in August. As this index is closely correlated with owner occupier housing finance commitments, we anticipate a fall in the number of owner occupier commitments next month when the ABS releases August data. In volume terms, owner occupier loan demand is pretty steady and appears to be at or close to its peak. Focussing on the value of lending it continues to climb as home values continue to increase. After seemingly topping out over recent months, investor commitments recorded a sharp rise in July. As a proportion, investment lending is at its second highest monthly level ever and highest ever level if you exclude refinances. The high level of investment lending remains a key area of concern. With returns on safe asset classes extremely low many investors are purchasing property, mainly in Sydney and Melbourne where capital growth is strong and interest costs on loans are historically low. As we have mentioned many times, such high rates of capital gain won’t continue forever and our concern remains what will happen if once the growth dissipates and interest rates move higher there may be a high number of these investors looking to exit property. We know that historically once value growth slows demand also eases, if these investors look to sell as demand drops a risk develops that value falls could become greater as these investors enter a discounting war in order to sell their homes. Obviously this may be good news for those first time buyers which are currently sidelined from the market however it would be bad news for the two thirds of Australians that own or have a mortgage and have the majority of their wealth stored in their home in the form of equity.

Expensive Melbourne houses record largest value growth

The August RP Data CoreLogic Home Value Indices results released this month show a rise in dwelling values of 0.8 per cent in Melbourne and a 7.6 per cent rise this year. A detailed review of the market shows that the most expensive segment of the market, 25 per cent most expensive houses , recorded the highest value growth this year. This segment of the market will be interesting to follow this spring and over summer as there is a strong correlation between the performance of the auction market. In the first eight months values rose by 9.6 per cent compared to 8.7 per cent for the middle of the market, and 3.7 per cent for the most affordable segment. All segments of the market for houses have outperformed the unit market with the exception of the most affordable segment. Values of the most affordable 25 per cent of the unit market have grown by 4.4 per cent this year compared to 3.7 per cent for houses. A longer term view of the market, comparing its performances since the last peak in values, reveals a slightly different picture. Values for houses in the most expensive and middle segments of the market peaked in October 2010. Since that time it is the middle of this market that has seen the strongest increase in values of 9.8 per cent compared to 7 per cent for the most expensive segment. Given most of the people selling will have bought their homes before 2010, it is this longer-term view that is more relevant. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Spring market commences with high demand and clearance rates

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 7 September 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 74.4 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 72.9 per cent last week and 74.9 per cent this time last year. Results across capital cities this week, especially Sydney, provide a clear indication that this will be good spring for sellers. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 82.4 per cent was recorded compared to 79.9 per cent last week. Clearances around 80 per cent in Sydney indicate a high level of competition and confidence from buyers. In Melbourne this spring is shaping as a better one than last year with more homes being listed and sold as both sellers and buyers are confident of a good outcome. There was a preliminary clearance rate of 75.1 per cent recorded compared to 73.5 per cent last week. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 49.4 per cent was recorded compared to 46.8 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 70.2 per cent compared to 64.9 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 55.6 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 28.6 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Capital city auction volumes rise compared to this time last year

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 7 September 2014 There are 2,057 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,692 auctions expected compared to 1,054 for the same period last year. Last week represented a healthy lead up to the spring auction market. The market should be positively impacted by the RBA’s decision to keep interest rates at current low levels. A repeat of last week’s results is required if last year’s spring season, with a clearance rate of 70.7 per cent from 25,266 auctions in capital cities, is to be exceeded. There are 765 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week compared to 901 last week and 530 this time last year. From a vendors perspective the spring auction market is gaining strength at just the right time with buyers driving the clearance rate higher as stock levels rise. Sydney is appearing to be stronger with higher volumes and higher clearance rates, than at the same time last year. RP Data is expecting 633 auctions compared to 810 last week and 337 for this week last year. The highest volume of auctions is in Paddington where 11 are expected. Canberra, which last week experienced its highest clearance rate in four years has 66 auctions scheduled compared to 37 last week. The highest volume of auctions is expected in the suburbs of Forrest and Kambah, both of which have 4 scheduled. Brisbane is expecting 105 auctions after 156 last week. Adelaide is expecting 80 auctions, compared to 88 last week. The highest volume of auctions is expected in Norwood, Parkside and Tennyson, each of which have 3 scheduled. Perth has 30 auctions compared to 29 last week. There are 6 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in the Melbourne suburb of Glen Waverly where 16 are expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 7 September, 2014

There are 765 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 530 for the same time last year. The highest number of auctions is expected in the Glen Waverly with 16 scheduled this week. Buyers are likely to face more vibrant market conditions and higher prices compared to the spring selling season last year. The August RP Data Core Logic home value indices results released this week shows a rise in dwelling values of 0.8 per cent in Melbourne and 7.6 per cent rise this year. Due to high levels of supply in the unit market, the majority of the growth occurring in the market is for houses. For houses, the index recorded a rise of 8.3 per cent this year compared to 2.5 per cent for units. Time on market results for houses sold at private sale rose from 44 days to 47 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting rose from -5.2 per cent to -5.3 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 31 August: 73.5 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 7 September: 765 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 31 August: 47 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 31 August: -5.3 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are -1.3 per cent lower in month ending 31 August seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

July 2014 building approvals data

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released building approvals data for July 2014 earlier today. The data shows that there continues to be a strong pipeline of residential development in place. Focussing on dwelling approvals nationally, there were 9,585 house approvals and 6,733 unit approvals over the month. The number of dwelling approvals increased by 2.5% over the month with house approvals up 1.5% and unit approvals up 4.0%. Although dwelling approvals have increased over the month they were -7.8% lower in July than the most recent peak in January 2014 when there were 17,698 dwelling approvals. Although dwelling approvals increased over the month, they have fallen for eight of the past 12 months. Monthly dwelling approvals data tends to be volatile so I also like to look at annualised data to see a trend. Over the 12 months to July 2014 there were 195,227 dwelling approvals. This was an all-time high number of annual approvals. Unit approvals were also at an historic high level over the year while house approvals were well below their record high of 140,832 recorded over the 12 months to April 1989. Over the 12 months to July 2014, unit approvals accounted for 43.6% of all dwelling approvals, up from 42.1% a year earlier. Across the combined capital cities, there were a record high of 145,065 dwellings approved for construction over the 12 months to July 2014. The number of capital city dwelling approvals has increased by 21.9% over the past year. Over the year there were, 71,085 approvals for houses and 73,980 unit approvals with house approvals up 20.8% and unit approvals 22.9% higher. Across the individual capital cities, Brisbane has recorded the greatest increase in dwelling approvals over the year 44.5% followed by: Sydney 29.0% , Perth 26.6% and Adelaide 25.1% . Dwelling approvals are lower over the year in Darwin -14.5% and Canberra -7.6% while Melbourne 10.9% and Hobart 11.7% have recorded only moderate rises in dwelling approvals. Despite certain cities recording significant rises in dwelling approvals, Sydney and Melbourne have accounted for more than 57% of all capital city dwelling approvals over the past year. A key driver of the overall increase in dwelling approvals has been the rising prominence of the unit market. Over the past year, the increase in unit approvals has been greater than the increase in house approvals in Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth. Although unit approvals have recorded greater increases in these cities, there has been a substantial decline in unit approvals across Hobart and falls in both Darwin and Canberra. With more than half of all capital city dwelling approvals for units as opposed to houses, all individual capital cities except for Adelaide 31.1% , Perth 25.0% and Hobart 9.0% are seeing a majority of approvals for units. In Sydney, 68.3% of dwelling approvals were for units over the past year, elsewhere 52.1% were for units in Melbourne, 56.0% in Brisbane, 62.0% in Darwin and 57.6% in Canberra. Sydney has consistently approved more units than houses since 1993 and Darwin has consistently approved more units than houses since 2003, while across the other cities it is a relatively new phenomenon. Melbourne has only been approving more units than houses since mid-2012, in Brisbane it has occurred since mid-2013 and in Canberra since mid-2010. Of course there is increasing levels of demand for units but particularly in Melbourne and Brisbane the number of units in the pipeline is largely untested. Unless the introduction of supply is closely managed there is a potential risk of unit over supply. With dwelling approvals at historic high levels, dwelling construction will continue to help bolster GDP as engineering construction. The challenge will be whether dwelling construction is enough to off-set the fall in engineering construction and it seems that it probably won’t be. Construction work done data for the June quarter showed that residential construction accounted for 25.8% of total work done compared to 57.2% attributable to engineering. At its absolute peak residential construction accounted for just over half of the value 50.2% of all work done. It is likely that residential dwelling construction alone will not be able to off-set the fall in mining investment. Although the pipeline of residential construction is strong, it seems unlikely that it will be able to completely off-set the decline in engineering construction. Furthermore, it is unlikely that all of these approvals will come to fruition in the short-term. Unless there is ongoing demand a proportion of these new approvals won’t commence as they won’t get the necessary pre-sales to receive construction finance. In light of this, interest rates are likely to remain low to try and encourage further housing demand. As a result, unless the RBA and APRA introduce macro prudential tools it seems unlikely home value appreciation will cease until such time as mortgage rates increase.

Clearance rate of 72.2% across capital cities on spring eve

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 31 August, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 72.2 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 69.5 per cent last week and 71.5 per cent this time last year. This is the highest recoded since early March this year. Data from the last four weeks has shown that this the best lead into spring since 2010 with more homes being sold at auction and overall higher prices in most capital cities. In Sydney the market is delivering results comparable to this time last year and looks set to have a strong spring. This week a preliminary clearance rate of 81.1 per cent was recorded compared to 76.1 per cent last week. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 71 per cent recorded compared to 70.7 per cent last week. This has been the most vibrant auction market since the middle of February this year with three consecutive weeks over 70 per cent. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 47 per cent was recorded compared to 51.2 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 66.1 per cent compared to 67.2 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 72.4 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 46.2 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Five big numbers for Melbourneâ

Real estate is often about numbers. Everything it seems, from the price of the house to the weekly rent, can be expressed as a number. Here are five topical numbers as the market enters spring. 25,080 This is the number of units in the suburb of Melbourne. Melbourne has the most individual dwellings of any suburb in the city which will come as little surprise to anyone who has watched the highrise market take off in the last decade. This is also a very large number in the context of the general density of the city. By way of contrast, the suburb with the most houses is Reservoir with 13,692 and when you include all the units, the number rises to 20,430, still well short of Melbourne. 871 With 871 houses sold in the last twelve months Pakenham has recorded the most house sales of any suburb in Melbourne. The popularity of housing in the suburb is based on many factors, key amongst them is its relative affordability. Based on the sales in the last year the median price was $337,500 compared $532,000 for Melbourne. 49 There are now 49 suburbs in Melbourne that have a median house value of $1m or more. At nearly one in ten sales across the city occurring for a sale price in the million dollar range, it is far more common than it used to be. What has not changed is the most expensive suburb, Toorak, which had a median value of $2.941m and saw 151 sales for more than a million dollars over the past year. 30 The median value of a house in Melbourne has grown by 30.4 per cent over the past 5 years. Only two capital cities have exceeded that over the same time, Sydney and Darwin. 1 One is the number of suburbs in the cities west that have a median house value of more than one million dollars. Overlooking the Maribyrnong River and neighbouring the popular Essendon, Aberfeldie has a median house value of $1.04m after a 14 per cent rise in last year. If you wanted to live there and can afford the price then you will probably need to wait as it is only a small suburb, 1099 houses, and averages only one sale every 6.5 days. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Auctions most popular in Melbourne, Sydney and Canberra

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 31 August, 2014 There are 2,281 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,854 auctions expected compared to 2,000 for the same period last year. This is the highest volume in eight weeks and it will continue to rise over the coming weeks. RP Data recently reviewed the statistical significance of auctions, as while they can dominate the weekly market analysis due to the clearance rate statistic they account for a minority of sales in capital cities. Taking into account all settled sales in the months between February and May this year auctions accounted for 21.9 per cent of all capital city sales excluding Darwin . There are 809 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week compared to 758 last week and 837 this time last year. Melbourne traditionally has the highest proportion of sales by auction of all capital cities and in the months of February to May this year this remained the case as they accounted for 35.3 per cent of all sales. Sydney is expecting 741 auctions compared to 641 last week and 851 for this week last year. Sydney is beginning to rival Melbourne as the nations auction capital, in the months of February to May this year auctions accounted for 30.5 per cent of all sales. Canberra has 36 auctions scheduled compared to 51 last week. In the months of February to May auctions accounted for 17.9 per cent of all sales. Brisbane is expecting 140 auctions after 134 last week. As is usually the case there are more auctions in Queensland outside of Brisbane, with 201 expected. In the months of February to May auctions have accounted for 6.4 per cent of all sales in Brisbane. Adelaide is expecting 82 auctions, compared to 71 this time last year. In the months of February to May auctions have accounted for 10.7 per cent of all sales. Perth has 29 auctions compared to 41 last week. In the months of February to May auctions have accounted for a low 1.8 per cent of all sales. There are 11 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. In the months of February to May auctions have accounted for 4.8 per cent of all sales in Hobart. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in the Melbourne suburb of South Yarra where 21 are expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 31 August, 2014

There are 809 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 837 for the same time last year. The highest number of auctions are expected in the South Yarra with 21 expected. The auction market is gathering strength with an average clearance rate of 70.6 per cent over the past 4 weeks. This is the last week before spring officially starts and the latest research from RP Data shows that there have been, including last week, 26.7 per cent more homes sold at auction than the same time last year. Importantly there have been almost as many extra sales with 24.7 per cent more sales at auction in Melbourne. At this stage conditions are well balanced between buyers and sellers across the market. Time on market results for houses sold at private sale was stable at 44 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting rose from -5.1 per cent to -5.2 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 31 August: 70.7 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 31 August: 809 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 24 August: 44 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 24 August: -5.2per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are -0.2 per cent lower in month ending 24 August seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Most popular Melbourne suburbs for owner occupiers by distance from the CBD

The suburbs with the highest proportion of owner occupiers differ in value and tend to have one thing in common – they are well established and in contrast to those proving popular for investors. Last week’s blog post revealed that many of the most popular suburbs for investors were those that are more recently developed. In the inner city the suburbs within a 10km of the CBD such as Aberfeldie, has the highest proportion of houses with 90 per cent of these owner occupied. Aberfeldie recently became the first million dollar suburb in the city’s west. Strathmore ranked second with owner occupiers accounting for 88.6 per cent of houses. The top five is rounded out by Kew East, Ivanhoe and Malvern. In the middle ring of suburbs, those between 10 and 20km of the CBD, there is greater disparity in the prices of suburbs popular with owner occupiers. Eltham North recorded 94.3 per cent of houses as being owned by their occupiers and second on the list, Campbellfield, had 91.4 per cent. Campbellfield is much more affordable with a median house value of $334,601 compared to $646,869 in Eltham North. Finally, in the outer suburbs the highest proportion of owner occupiers at 95.2 per cent can be found in Montose. Four of the top five suburbs are in fact are in or near-to the Dandenongs. Second on the list, Mount Evelyn, has 94.1 per cent of houses owned by their occupiers and Warranwood has 93.8 per cent. Fifth on the list, The Basin, recorded 93.7 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

APRA’s ADI property exposures data for June 2014

The Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA released their quarterly Authorised Deposit-taking Institution ADI Property Exposures data for June 2014 earlier today. The data always provides a valuable insight into current and historic mortgage lending by ADIs. This quarter’s data showed some very interesting trends. Based on the value of all outstanding mortgages by households to Australian ADI’s, there $811.7 billion outstanding to owner occupiers 66.2% at the end of June 2014 and $413.5 billion to investors 33.8% . Over the 12 months to June 2014, the total value of outstanding mortgages to owner occupiers has increased by 7.5% compared to a 10.9% rise in outstanding credit to investors. At the end of June 2014, 36.0% of loans outstanding had an offset facility, up from 34.0% a year earlier. 35.7% of all outstanding mortgages were interest-only which was the highest on record and up from 34.3% a year earlier. Just 0.2% of all outstanding mortgages were reverse mortgages and 2.9% were low documentation which was down from 3.9% a year earlier. Other non-standard loans accounted for just 0.1% of all outstanding mortgages. The average balance on all outstanding mortgages at the end of June 2014 was $237,200. The average balance has increased by 3.2% over the past year. Loans with an offset facility $282,900 and interest-only mortgages $299,000 have much higher average outstanding loan balances. It is interesting to note that the annual growth in average outstanding loan balances has been much more moderate for mortgages with an offset and interest-only mortgages at 1.6% and 1.8% respectively. Encouragingly, the data also indicates that outstanding balances are reducing for low documentation and other non-standard loans as they become less common. Over the past year the average balance has fallen by -3.5% for low-documentation loans and by 5.9% for other non-standard loans. Turning the focus to new loans written over the June quarter, 62.1% of lending was to owner occupiers and a record high 37.9% was to investors. Compared to the June 2013 quarter, owner occupier lending is up 2.0% and investment lending is 14.4% higher. Over the quarter, 0.7% of new loans approved were low-documentation, 43.2% were interest only, 0.2% were other non-standard loans, 43.0% were third party originated loans and 3.7% were loans approved outside of serviceability. The 43.2% of new loans which were interest only was a record high, interest only loans tend to be but not always reflective of lending for investment purposes. The ADIs seem to be increasing the usage of their broker channels with the 43.0% of loans originated by third parties the highest proportion since June 2008. Although only 3.7% of loans were approved outside of serviceability over the June quarter, this was the highest proportion on record. This may indicate that there has been some relaxation of lending standards over the quarter however it is difficult to conclude any firm conclusions. Nevertheless it is something to keep an eye on over the coming few quarters. Looking at the loan to value ratios LVR of loans written over the June quarter. 24.0% of new loans had an LVR of less than 60%, 42.2% of loans had an LVR of between 60% and 80%, 21.3% had an LVR of between 80% and 90% and 12.5% had an LVR of 90% or more. The 12.5% of new loans with an LVR of more than 90% is the lowest proportion since June 2011. This suggests there are proportionally less high-risk mortgages being written. The data has certainly shifted quite significantly over the past quarter and year. There is definitely a significant level of activity by investors and clearly ADIs appear happy to lend to them. The rise in the proportion of new loans written outside of serviceability is a potential concern however, it is positive to see that the proportion of loans with an LVR of 90% or more falling. The high level of interest only lending is also a cause for concern. Of course interest rates are currently very low but such a high level of interest only lending in light of low interest rates may cause some issues when rates eventually start to rise. As we have mentioned previously, the high proportion of investment lending is our biggest cause for concern in the current market. The lure of strong capital growth in Sydney and Melbourne is attracting the attention of investors as risk-free investments offer very low returns. Of course, that growth in values won’t continue forever and once it slows or values fall our chief concern remains that many investors may look to exit the asset class. Should this occur, inner city unit markets where investor activity is most prevalent could see a more significant drop in values than they otherwise would have as investors exit at a time when demand also falls. This scenario could have greater repercussions for the overall market, not just the inner city areas.

National auction market well placed for spring sales

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 24 August, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 66.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 70.8 per cent last week and 70 per cent this time last year. All capital cities have seen a higher number of auctions than last year. Compared to last year the best performing auction markets from the perspective of relative improvement this year have been Sydney, Tasmania and then Adelaide. Sydney has seen a 63 per cent rise in the number of homes sold at auction, Tasmania a 56 per cent rise and a 48 per cent rise was recorded in Adelaide. It should be noted that there have been 357 auctions in Tasmania this year, 2,467 in Adelaide and 22,329 in Sydney. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 76.2 per cent was recorded this week compared to 76.2 per cent last week. Compared to last year and over recent months Sydney has clearly been the strongest auction market. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 64.1 per cent recorded compared to 73.3 per cent last week. Melbourne remains on trend and once final results are in should confirm it has a healthy auction market on the eve of spring. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 52.1 per cent was recorded compared to 50 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 68.5 per cent compared to 65.6 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 46.9 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 38.9 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

How important are clearance rates in the housing market?

Over the first five months of the year, across the combined capital cities of Australia, RP Data has recorded 35,367 auctions of which 24,320 69% sold either under the hammer or shortly before/after the auction date. Over the same time frame we have recorded a total of 128,437 house and unit sales. Based on these numbers, auction sales account for about 19% of all sales across the capital cities of Australia excluding Darwin . Excluding the month of January, where very few auctions are held, the proportion of auctions to total sales increases to 22% between February and May. The remaining 81% of home sales were sold by private treaty. The fact that private treaty sales account for the vast majority of all home sales often gets overlooked when people are commenting on recent market conditions and trends. Of course the proportion of auctions varies substantially from city to city. Melbourne and Sydney have historically had a selling culture that is more heavily aligned with auctions as a method of sale. Between February and May of this year, auction sales accounted for 35% of all Melbourne sales and 31% of all Sydney sales. At the other end of the spectrum is Perth where auctions are comparatively rare, comprising just 2% of all sales over the same time frame. Another trend we have seen in the market since the growth phase kicked off in June 2012 is a substantial rise in auctions as a proportion of the total market. Clearly auctions as a method of sale are more popular when housing market conditions are ‘hot’; a fact which comes as no surprise. Auctions work best when there is high buyer demand providing a competitive bidding environment. Of course, home value growth is strongest at the moment in Sydney and Melbourne which are the two most auction-centric markets. What is interesting though is that auctions as a proportion of all sales are significantly higher over the current growth cycle ie June 2012 to current compared with the previous growth cycle ie Jan 2009 to Oct 2010 . So… considering that private treaty sales account for a larger proportion of housing sales than auctions, what high frequency metrics are available to monitor this side of the market? RP Data publishes a variety of vendor metrics each week, with the most commonly referred to metrics being the average selling time and average level of vendor discounting which are both measures of private treaty conditions. Both of these measures exclude auction results. The average selling time is a measure based on the number of days from when a home is first advertised to the contract date of sale. The vendor discount provides a metric on how much vendors are reducing their initial asking price in order to sell their home. It’s based on the percentage difference between the initial asking price and the contract price on the home. Both indicators are updated weekly by RP Data based on data received over the past 28 days. There are additional weekly metrics where you can follow the housing market trends such as updates to the RP Data Home Value indices, median selling prices, number of listings in the market, and metadata indices that indicate mortgage demand RP Data Mortgage Index and how many homes are being prepared for sale RP Data Listings Index .

National auction market lifting after strongest result in 5 months

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 24 August, 2014 There are 1,868 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,527 auctions expected compared to 1,572 for the same period last year. Last week we saw the best national clearance rate of 70.8 per cent in 5 months as both Sydney and Melbourne exceeded the 70 per cent mark. This improvement was based on ongoing and solid results in Sydney and more moderate improvements in Melbourne. Those vendors holding auctions in Melbourne this week will draw confidence from data showing progressive improvement over the past 5 weeks with the clearance rate rising marginally each week. There are 689 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week compared to 727 last week and 712 this time last year. Sydney is expecting 574 auctions compared to 578 last week and 557 for this week last year. The year to date clearance rate is 74.7 per cent from 22,239 auctions compared to 70.2 per cent from 14,604 last year. At the same time five years ago, there were only 11,050 auctions. Brisbane is expecting 113 auctions after 98 last week. Overall the auction market this year has improved marginally with a 46.1 per cent clearance rate compared to 40.6 per cent last year. A positive sign is the higher clearance rate which is based on 12.8 per cent more auctions. Adelaide is expecting 61 auctions, the same as last week and this time last year. Canberra has 45 auctions scheduled compared to 31 last week. Perth has 20 auctions compared to 30 last week. There are 8 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in two Melbourne suburbs, Reservoir and Richmond both have 15 scheduled. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 24 August, 2014

There are 689 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 712 for the same time last year. It is encouraging for sellers that for each of the last 5 weeks the clearance rate has risen in the lead up to spring. As the market has appreciated over the past year it has resulted in some new suburbs joining the ranks of those with million dollar median values for houses. The new suburbs were Aberfeldie, Caulfield South, Fitzroy North, McKinnon, Ormond, Park Orchards, Princess Hill, South Melbourne and South Yarra. This is particularly noteworthy as Aberfeldie is the first suburb from the western region of Melbourne to upgrade to the million dollar median value ranks while Fitzroy North and Princess Hill are the first in the north. These changes underscore just how much the structure of the housing market has changed in the last decade. Time on market results for houses sold at private sale was essentially stable with a small rise from 43 to 44 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting fell from -5.3 per cent the previous week to -5.1 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 17 August: 73.3 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 24 August: 689 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 17 August: 44 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 17 August: -5.1per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 1.2 per cent higher in month ending 17 August seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Investor activity by distance from Melbourne CBD

What drives investment activity in one suburb over another? Is it pursuit of a high yield or is it a desire for good capital gains? These are often debated topics and interestingly the data suggests there is not one clear-cut answer. For instance, a review of the proportion of houses owned by investors in the inner, middle and outer suburbs shows a high level of investment in suburbs with low and high yields. In the inner city, those suburbs within a 10km radius of the CBD is where the highest level of investors can be found in Carlton North, followed by North Melbourne and Richmond. Carlton North has a historically high level of appreciation and low yield whereas Richmond has a very low appreciation and higher yield. In the middle suburbs, those between 10 and 20k from the CBD, the investor activity is highest in growth suburbs with new housing – Laverton, Derrimut and Deer Park. These suburbs have good yield according to the research but lower capital gains prospects given the high level of supply. Conversely, an established suburb such asClayton has a high level of investors and very low yield, presumably because the market is purpose-built around students. Finally, in the outer suburbs the investment activity is again concentrated in growth suburbs which are seeing a high rate of new home construction. For example Point Cook, Tarneit and Truganina. The research suggests that there is more to the decisions of investors than suburb level analysis of yield and historical capital gains. Issues such as the level of supply is important, some suburbs are popular simply because they provide affordable stock for investors. Others are popular because investors are capitalising on a local factor, such as a university. Possibly what’s more important is that investment decisions are also made after consideration of the actual house and its relative location and price. Next week I will look at suburbs popular with owner investors and by distance from the CBD. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

National clearance rate stable at 68.4 per cent

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 17 August, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 68.4 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 68 per cent last week and 70.4 per cent this time last year. The health of the national auction market this year is highlighted by the fact that since the start of the year, not including this week, there had been 42 per cent more homes sold under the hammer compared to this time last year. In raw numbers this is 36,608 homes sold at auction compared to 25,623 last year. A significant contributor to the improved national result is Sydney and this continued this week. In Sydney a preliminary clearance rate of 76.7 per cent was recorded this week compared to 74.7 per cent last week. Melbourne returned a result on trend this week with a preliminary clearance rate of 67.7 per cent recorded compared to 69.6 per cent last week. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 50 per cent was recorded compared to 33.3 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 69.2 per cent compared to 69.1 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 55.2 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 27.3 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Solid auction market a reflection of good capital gains in Sydney and Melbourne

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 17 August, 2014 There are 1,819 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,429 auctions expected compared to 1,470 for the same period last year. The healthy level of listings for auctions is a reflection on the state of the broader market. Auctions traditionally work well as a sales technique in a market with a high level of competition. Due to the strong capital gains reported in the two main auction markets, Sydney and Melbourne this is especially the case in 2014. There are 658 auctions scheduled in Melbourne this week compared to 774 last week and 668 this time last year. There have been 15,871 homes sold at auction so far this year which is 27 per cent more than the same time last year In Sydney there are 529 auctions expected compared to 530 last week and 568 for this week last year. The highest number of auctions in a single suburb will be found in Randwick where 11 are scheduled. Interestingly only one of the auctions there is for a house. Brisbane is expecting 88 auctions after 123 last week. Adelaide is expecting 72 auctions compared to 61 last week. Canberra has 45 auctions scheduled compared to 31 last week. The highest volume of auctions in a single suburb is expected the city’s south, in Kambah and Rivett, both of which have 4 scheduled. Perth has 28 auctions compared to 25 last week. There are 12 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in Melbourne. Bentleigh and Brunswick both have 12 scheduled. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 17 August, 2014

There are 658 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 668 for the same time last year. The growth in the volume of homes being listed for sale in Melbourne has slowed following a strong first half of the year. A range of data available which highlights the moderate, but not strong, nature of the Melbourne market. The most recent of this is the settled sales so far for this year. It shows transactions have only risen by 5 per cent compared to 2013 and remain 18 per cent below the peak of 2007. On current numbers the total number of residential sales in Melbourne is projected to be between 85,000 and 87,000 compared to 82,495 last year and 72,757 in 2012. Remarkably the proportion of homes sold at auction is 35 per cent higher than last year. Time of market results for houses sold at private sale contracted from 46 days to 43 days over the last week whilst vendor discounting rose from -5.1 per cent to -5.3 per cent. This reflected a largely stable market for houses at private sale. Key data Clearance rate week ending 10 August: 69.6 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 17 August: 658 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 10 August: 43 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 10 August: -5.3 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 2.7 per cent higher in month ending 10 August seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

You can’t always judge a suburb by its median sale price

Around one in ten of all residential home sales in Melbourne transact for more than $1m and most are concentrated in the inner east and south east. Such is the concentration that it is very hard to find a suburb with a median house price of under $1m along the length of Burke Road. That is of course no surprise to anyone who follows the local market. More surprising is the suburbs with million dollar sales in the outer suburbs. For this exercise ‘outer’ includes those suburbs that are 20k or more from the CBD. In those areas the outer suburban million dollar market is most concentrated in the Mornington Peninsula and in the Kingston council area. A common theme in these suburbs is the proximity to the bay and its associated recreational options. The highest prevalence was in Mount Eliza where 83 homes have sold for over $1 million in the past year, 10 of which were sold for more than $2 million. Mount Martha, which shares many of the same attractions recorded 48 sales at or in excess of $1 million, almost one a week. The median sale price in Mount Eliza was $775,000 and in Mount Martha it was $620,000. As you travel further south there are a range of other suburbs that recorded more than 10 sales above the $1 million mark including Sorrento, Mornington, Safety Beach, Rye and Blairgowie. Obviously like Mount Eliza and Mount Martha the majority of homes in all of these suburbs sell for well under a million dollars so the data shows that, due to the location within the suburb, a different group of buyers is active. Clearly you can’t fully judge a suburb by its median sale price. This is also the case in the City of Kingston, in Mentone, Parkdale, Patterson Lakes and Mordialloc where between 24 and nine $1 million sales occurred in the last year. With the exception of Patterson Lakes these sales will mostly be in the section of these suburbs between the Nepean Highway and Port Phillip Bay. The positive impact of The Bay on property values extends to Frankston as well where 13 sales in excess of $1 million were recorded in Frankston South and eight in Frankston. Other areas that saw these sales at the very top end of the market were Eltham, Mitcham and Vermont. Robert Larocca RP Data Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Sydney leads as national clearance rate dips to 65.9%

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 10 August, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 65.9 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 68.9 per cent last week, and 70.1 per cent this time last year. The lower clearance rate was a result of a softening in the Melbourne market. This contrasted with the very buoyant outcome in Sydney and Adelaide. Sydney continues to be the capital city with the strongest and most consistent auction market. A preliminary clearance rate of 75.5 per cent was recorded this week compared to 76.7 per cent last week. The lowest result in 9 weeks occurred in Melbourne where a preliminary clearance rate of 63.9 per cent recorded compared to 69 per cent last week. Auction numbers have risen in the inner east after a seasonal lull. Rising stock numbers in the next month will clearly test the market. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 35.3 per cent was recorded compared to 36.7 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a very strong clearance rate of 75 per cent compared to 61 per cent last week. Low stock numbers at this time of the year can affect the clearance rate by making in more variable than in spring and summer. In Canberra a clearance rate of 45.8 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 66.7 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Housing finance data for June 2014

The total value of housing finance commitments increased by 1.0% in June 2014. The total value of housing finance commitment is 15.6% higher year-on-year. Meanwhile the number of housing finance commitments to owner occupiers has increased by 0.2% over the month and has increased by just 2.4% over the 2013/14 financial year. The total value of housing finance commitments continues to trend higher however; the strength of the investment segment has waned over recent months. Over the month the owner occupier segment fuelled the increase with refinances up 1.6% and non-refinances up 1.9% while investment lending fell by -0.3%. It was the first time investment lending has fallen over consecutive months since December 2012. Year-on-year, the value of housing finance commitments is 15.6% higher with owner occupier refinances up 14.8%, owner occupier non-refinances up 9.4% and investment loans rising 23.8%. As a proportion of total lending, the level of lending for investment purposes remains inflated on an historic basis although it has eased slightly. Owner occupier non-refinance commitments accounted for 43.4% of total lending in June compared to 18.1% to owner occupiers for refinances and 38.5% for investors. Although investment lending has eased it continues to hover at around its highest levels since late 2003. Remember 2003 was the final days of the housing boom in both Sydney and Melbourne which commenced in 2001. The number of housing finance commitments to owner occupiers increased by 0.2% over the month and was 2.4% higher year-on-year. The year-on-year increase is the slowest rate of increase since February 2013. This indicates that although demand for housing demand has increased, the rate of growth in this demand is slowing. Looking at the more detailed components, refinance commitments are -0.7% lower over the month and 5.1% higher year-on-year. Non-refinance commitments have increased by 0.6% over the month and are 1.2% higher year-on-year. The number of owner occupier housing finance commitments can be further broken down in to the type of commitments the finance is for. The three categories we analyse here are: construction of dwellings, purchase of new dwellings and purchase of established dwellings excluding refinances . Over the month, construction of dwellings rose by 1.1%, purchase of new dwellings was 4.6% higher and purchase of established dwellings edged just 0.1% higher. Year-on-year, the market strength has been associated with construction of new dwellings +17.0% rather than purchase of new dwellings -2.1% and purchase of established dwellings -1.7% . In fact the number of owner occupier finance commitments for construction of new homes is at its highest level since February 2010. Keep in mind that in June 2014, 17.9% of these non-refinance commitments were for construction of dwellings, 8.2% were for purchase of new dwellings and 73.9% were for purchase of established dwellings. The number of owner occupier housing finance commitments for first home buyers fell by -3.6% in June 2014 and are -6.2% lower year-on-year. First home buyers continue to play little role in the market, accounting for just 13.2% of total owner occupier housing finance commitments in June. Interestingly the average loan size for first home buyers is increasing. As home values rise they need to borrow a greater amount, this is highlighted by the 7.1% year-on-year rise which is the largest since December 2009. RP Data’s Mortgage Index RMI which provides a lead indicator to the number of owner occupier housing finance commitments indicates that there is likely to be a lift in July. Activity levels were 6.7% higher in July 2014 compared to June suggesting a likely rise in housing finance commitments over the coming month. The data shows that while demand for housing finance is holding we are potentially seeing a slowdown in demand from the investment segment. Meanwhile demand for owner occupiers is steady, albeit the rate of growth is slowing with the strongest increases arising for those constructing their own home. Spring will be the real test for the market from here, investment activity remains elevated, auction volumes and results have been strong throughout winter and we wait to see if this momentum continues for the remainder of the year. Particularly given that although values are continuing to increase, they are doing so at a more moderate pace than they were throughout late 2013 and early 2014. Although mortgage demand has picked-up over the past two years, it is important to note that the number of finance commitments remain well below 2009 and much lower than activity levels prior to the financial crisis.

Don’t expect Melbourne values to rise by 44% over the coming year

It was surprising to see an article published by Fairfax late last week that criticized our publication of monthly housing market statistics. The article that can be viewed here remarks that the RP Data indices are ridiculous and implies that the monthly results are misleading. The theme of the article focusses on the monthly result for Melbourne where we reported a 3.7% rise in Melbourne dwelling values over the month of July. For starters, the article did not disclose the fact that Fairfax publishes a competing index which is not a monthly measurement and lacks the timeliness of the RP Data series. Fairfax also owns a data business that is competitive with RP Data. The lack of disclosure around this conflict should come as a shock to readers who expect a greater level of transparency in reporting. It’s also worthwhile pointing out that our monthly hedonic index was developed in conjunction with Rismark International after the RBA released a discussion paper calling for more accurate and higher frequency reporting on housing market conditions. Since that time the RP Data monthly hedonic regression indices have become the index of choice for the RBA when it comes to reporting on housing market conditions in Australia. In an attempt to discredit our reporting and highlight what they perceive to be extreme volatility in the index reading, Fairfax take the monthly movement in our index value for Melbourne and annualise it to suggest the Melbourne housing market is heading for a 44%+ rate of growth over the coming year. Do commentators suggest the share market is set to boom when the S&P/ASX200 rises by 1.8% in a day an annualised gain of more than 400% using Fairfax’s logic ? The graph below demonstrates the difference in volatility between our daily housing market index and the daily S&P/ASX 200 index. The volatility in our capital city indices is around 4% per annum which is approximately one fifth of the volatility recorded across equity markets. The difference in volatility levels is clear from the graph below. Housing markets are much more stable than equity markets, however that isn’t to say that housing markets don’t show natural volatility. Housing market volatility simply hasn’t been measured in the past due to the lack of granularity and sophistication in the methods behind the measurements. If we look at monthly data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics we can also see some significant month-to-month fluctuations that can take commentators by surprise. Over the first six months of this year, dwelling approvals have had the following month-by month changes: +9.0% in January, -6.6% in February, -4.5% in March, -6.1% in April, +10.3% in May and -5.0% in June. Of a similar note, the number of owner occupier housing finance commitments has fluctuated significantly over the first five months of this year. The fluctuations on a month-to-month basis were as follows: 0.0% in January, +1.6% in February, -1.3% in March, -0.5% in April and -1.7% in May. The point here is that volatility is a part of measuring any market on a regular basis and must be considered when looking at the data. Short term movements in the property market cannot be viewed in isolation. A more reliable and informative way to interpret the statistics is to take the monthly change in context with the broader trend of the data. Over the past three months Melbourne values have shown a much lower 1.8% rise; in fact the rolling quarterly rate of growth has been tapering across Melbourne since March and the rolling half yearly rate of growth peaked in January. Subscribers to our index data, such as the Reserve Bank and Federal Treasury, rely on our monthly indices regularly, but they take a much more informed view of the results; interpreting the monthly statistics in context with the trend as well as other market evidence such as vendor metrics, supply introductions, housing finance demand and transaction volumes. We agree that property market information needs to be timely and meaningful, and it’s not just those people looking to buy or sell a home that should take interest. National regulators and policy makers have a high level of interest in housing market conditions; housing is an important component of financial stability. The banking and finance sector track housing market conditions closely, with more than 65% of bank’s loan assets are secured by residential property their requirement to assess housing market conditions is one of the their highest priorities. Industry professionals, who need to understand the ups and downs of housing market conditions on a timely and frequent basis in order to run a successful business, also have a requirement for accurate and timely housing market analytics. Statistics are like a foreign language for most people. While numbers can look straight forward, understanding what the numbers mean and how best to interpret them can be challenging. Unfortunately, when it comes to measuring things like asset values and market movements, whether it is real estate or equities or other asset classes, complex mathematics is often required. Around 15 months ago RP Data, together with Rismark International, launched a new and improved hedonic methodology which provided a daily measurement of how dwelling values were performing. Our daily index tracks the overall change in home values across the complete portfolio of properties across the capital cities; essentially imputing the value of every house and apartment each day and measuring the change across the overall portfolio values between each period. Prior to being released to the market, RP Data’s indices were audited by both Alex Frino at Capital Markets CRC and KPMG from an infrastructure perspective. We consulted with the RBA. White papers on the index methodology are available to be downloaded from the RP Data web site. No other index provider goes to such lengths to provide a transparent level of documentation around their methodologies and processes. RP Data also spends about $15 million each year on data capture, cleansing and improvement. On a weekly basis we typically capture between 85% and 90% of all auction results which is generally much higher than other residential property data businesses. We receive about 60% of our transaction data directly from the industry which provides a much more timely mechanism for collecting property data than waiting on government provided records, however we also collect virtually 100% of all property transactions nationally from the respective state government departments. So in summary, we take data collection and the production and release of our indices very seriously as we fully understand and appreciate the important decisions being made every day by regulators, policy makers, financial institutions, other industry professionals and consumers, in reliance on our data and analytics, including our indices. The nature of statistics is such that from time to time you will get outlier results such as last month’s Melbourne figure and yes, businesses with competing interests to RP Data will use results such as this to attack us from time to time. The important thing is to understand outlier results occur every so often in any statistical model. Like industry professionals, policy makers and regulators, industry commentators need to understand this, not dismiss or discount these figures and pay attention to the longer-term trends.

Volumes and clearance rates stable

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 10 August, 2014 There are 1,726 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,372 auctions expected compared to 1,441 for the same period last year. Based on previous years this annual period typified by low auction volumes should be over by the end of the month. The national clearance rate has been both stable over the past few weeks and in line with this time last year. Given the higher volumes this means more active buyers are in the market. In Melbourne the auction market has now returned three solid weeks with moderate improvement. There are 673 auctions scheduled this week compared to 636 last week and 677 this time last year. The performance of the market may change again as inner eastern suburbs are featuring the highest volumes of auctions once again. In Sydney there are 486 auctions expected compared to 588 last week and 521 for this week last year. Last week’s clearance rate of 76.7 per cent was the highest since March. The auction market is following the trajectory of last year which suggests a very competitive spring ahead for buyers. Brisbane is expecting 97 auctions after 96 last week. Adelaide is expecting 50 auctions compared to 95 last week. Canberra has 31 auctions scheduled compared to 28 last week. Perth has 25 auctions compared to 20 last week. There are 9 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in Malvern East, Balwyn North and Reservoir, each of which has 13 scheduled. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist 0409 198 350

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 10 August, 2014

There are 673 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 677 for the same time last year. Buyers are clearly in the market for capital gains, as yields remain low at 3.3 per cent for houses; the lowest of all capital cities. Low yields translate into good conditions for renters in many parts of Melbourne. Recently released rental market data showed that the median advertised rent for a house in Melbourne was stable in July at $447 per week and has risen by 2.4 per cent in the previous twelve months. This means that the median advertised rent for houses is not keeping pace with the CPI, 3.2 per cent in Melbourne, for most relevant period. The comparable data for units showed a drop of a dollar a week to $397 over the month and an increase of 1.6 per cent in the year. This reflects the adequate levels of supply in the higher density market. The average time on market for houses sold last month rose from 44 to 46 days. Vendor discounting rose, but only slightly from -5 per cent the previous week to -5.1 per cent last week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 3 August: 69% Melbourne auctions expected week ending 10 August: 673 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 3 August: 46 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 3 August: -5.1% houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.7% higher in month ending 3 August seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

National clearance rate lifts

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 3 August, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 69.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 67.9 per cent last week and 69.3 per cent this time last year. Both Sydney and Melbourne, which account for the majority of the auction market in Australia, had strong results with clearance rates above trend. This week a preliminary clearance rate of 77.6 per cent was recorded in Sydney compared to 75.4 per cent last week. Prior to this weekend the year to date clearance rate was a healthy 74.4 per cent. In Melbourne a result above trend for the year was reached with a preliminary clearance rate of 70.9 per cent recorded compared to 68.5 per cent last week. Not including this weekends resultsthe clearance rate for the first 8 months of the year was 67.3 per cent. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 32.3 per cent was recorded compared to 44.7 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 60.3 per cent compared to 60.3 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 59.1 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 46.2 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne house values rise in July as units show no growth

The RP Data Rismark Home Value July index results shows that Melbourne dwelling values continued to grow in July with a new peak reached for houses and minimal value growth for units Based on current trends so far this year, vendors looking to sell houses in spring are well placed to do so. In the three months to the end of July, the RP Data Home Value Index for Melbourne dwellings rose 1.8 per cent bringing the year to date increase to 6.8 per cent. House values in Melbourne reached a new all time high in July after a 2 per cent rise over the quarter and 7.6 per cent rise over the year to date. Based on settled sales over the three months the median house price was $590,000. The unit market has leveled, displaying almost no growth in values as high levels of supply leave values unchanged over the last three months and only a 0.9 per cent rise over the first seven months of the year. The auction market continues to be healthy despite the normally softer winter season. The average clearance rate over the first 8 months of the year was 67.3 per cent, slightly down on the 68 per cent over the same time in 2013. Overall transaction, levels in Melbourne are still not showing rapid growth, the most recent data suggests a rise of only 5 per cent on last year which indicates a residential market that is healthy but not overheating. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Auction numbers up 38% compared to 2013

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 3 August, 2014 There are 1,731 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,391 auctions expected compared to 1,310 for the same period last year. A review of volumes nationally over the first 8 months shows there have been nearly 50,833 capital city auctions in total or, 38 per cent more auctions held when compared to the same period last year. In Melbourne there are 573 auctions scheduled this week compared to 736 last week and 600 this time last year. The clearance rate for the first 8 months of the year is 67.3 per cent, slightly down on the 68 per cent over the same time in 2013. Given the substantial increase in volumes this is not a negative sign. In Sydney there are 519 auctions expected compared to 660 last week and 466 for this week last year. Not only have there been more auctions than the same time last year but the clearance rate is higher at 74.4 per cent compared to 69.3 per cent in 2013. Brisbane is expecting 89 auctions after 162 last week. Compared to this time last year the clearance for the first 8 months is higher at 46.9 per cent compared to 39.5 per cent. Adelaide is expecting 92 auctions compared to 72 last week. The auction market is strong than last year with a clearance rate of 62.4 per cent compared to 51.2 per cent. Canberra has 26 auctions scheduled compared to 40 last week. The clearance rate has also risen in Canberra, at 55.9 per cent compared to 52 per cent last year. Perth has 17 auctions compared to 22 last week and lower year to date clearance of 41.2 per cent compared to 47.6 per cent. There are 10 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is again expected in the northern suburbs of Melbourne where 16 are expected in Reservoir. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist

June 2014 building approvals data

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released building approvals data for June 2014 earlier today. National dwelling approvals fell by 5.0% over the month with house approvals falling by -2.6% and unit approvals down -8.4%. Despite the fall in approvals over the month, a significant number of dwelling approvals remain in the pipeline. Note that dwelling approvals have now fallen over four of the past five months. Year-on-year, dwelling approvals are 16.0% higher in June 2014 than in June 2013. House approvals have increased by 12.2% year-on-year while unit approvals have surged by a greater 22.0%. The greater rise in unit approvals compared with house approvals reflects changing lifestyle patterns and greater acceptance of higher density living. However, a recent analysis we have undertaken indicates units are less likely to be ultimately completed than houses. Although the pipeline is strong, it is reasonable to expect that not all of these units will ultimately be constructed. The month-to-month dwelling approvals data is quite volatile, given this it is worthwhile looking at the annual number of approvals. Over the 12 months to June 2014 there were 108,598 house approvals and 85,067 unit approvals. With a total of 193,667 dwelling approvals over the year there has been a 20.7% increase in approvals year on year. Total annual dwelling approvals are now at their highest level since October 1994. Focussing on dwelling approvals, across the combined capital city housing markets there were 144,278 approvals over the 2013/14 financial year. This was an increase of 25.5% over the year and the highest number of annual approvals on record. Both Sydney and Perth have also recorded their highest ever number of dwelling approvals over the past year. Over the year there were 69,973 houses approved for construction +21.3% over the year and 74,305 unit approvals +29.8% . Most individual capital cities have recorded an increase in dwelling approvals over the year with the largest increases recorded in Brisbane 47.1% , Sydney 30.6% , Adelaide 30.4% and Perth 27.6% . Darwin was the only city where approvals were lower over the year, down -3.7%. Comparatively the annual increase in dwelling approvals has been much lower in Hobart 12.9% , Melbourne 13.9% and Canberra 22.6% . Sydney and Melbourne alone have accounted for almost 58% of all capital city dwelling approvals over the year. As noted earlier, there have been more unit approvals across the combined capital cities than house approvals. Over recent years around 98% of house approvals have ended up as completions compared to only 86% of unit approvals. While units are increasing in popularity there is much less certainty about their ultimate construction than there is for houses. Across the cities Sydney had 68.8% of approvals for units and in the remaining cities the figures were: Melbourne 52.9% , Brisbane 56.0% , Adelaide 32.3% , Perth 23.8% , Hobart 11.2% , Darwin 58.7% and Canberra 61.9% . Despite the monthly fall, the pipeline of dwellings approved for construction is significant. It is important to note that over the past five months, dwelling approvals have fallen on four occasions. This may indicate that the sector has moved through the peak levels of dwelling approvals. The strong pipeline of unit approvals, particularly in capital cities also carries a risk as units are less likely to be ultimately constructed than houses. Nevertheless, the Reserve Bank stated that with low interest rates they didn’t just want to see higher house prices but also a construction response. This certainly seems to be how the current conditions are playing out and with population growth recently starting to slow we may start to see an improvement in the alignment between home construction and population growth.

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 3 August, 2014

There are 573 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 600 for the same time last year. This is a rare but minor 4.5 per cent fall which does not reflect the fact that in the first 8 months of the year there have been 29.5 per cent more auctions than the same time in 2013. The current regional variation in auction numbers should be taken into account when analysing the auction market as many sellers in the inner east appear to avoiding winter. The main auction activity in Melbourne remains outside the inner eastern suburbs with 16 homes scheduled to go under the hammer in Reservoir, 11 in St Kilda and 10 in Essendon, Melbourne and Preston. For buyers looking in the more expensive inner east volumes are rising slowing with 6 expected in Camberwell, Kew and Hawthorn East. The average time on market for houses sold last month rose slightly from 43 to 44 days. Vendor discounting contracted from -5.2 per cent the previous week to -5 per cent last week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 27 July: 68.5 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 3 August: 573 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 27 July: 44 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 27 July: -5 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.7 per cent higher in month ending 27 July seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Calder Freeway provides drive for growth

The Calder Freeway, which makes its way through central Victoria’s has contributed to a increase in capital growth and compared to other regional centres towns along this transit corridor are showing the strong appreciation. For those unfamiliar with Victoria the Calder Freeway is the main road between Melbourne and Bendigo and links Macedon, Kyneton, Gisborne, Woodend and Castlemaine. There is also a matching rail service and both have been upgraded over the past decade. House values in these areas have outpaced Melbourne, Ballarat and Geelong over the past five years. The best growth was recorded in the Macedon Ranges Shire which includes Macedon, Kyneton, Gisborne and Woodend. Over the past five years house values have grown by 46.2 per cent. Following Macedon Ranges Shire was Mount Alexander Shire which is centred on Castlemaine. There house values have risen by 39.5 per cent. The further away from the Melbourne the area is the lower is the growth, presumably as there is less of a flow on from the metropolitan market. In the City of Greater Bendigo values have risen by 38.4 per cent, lower than Macedon Ranges but still well above the 28.4 per cent recorded in Melbourne. Interestingly values in Ballarat, with a rise of 33.9 per cent have also exceeded Melbourne. For many people, the attraction to these areas is highlighted by the availability of more affordable property coupled with a country lifestyle. The data shows that as a result of additional transport options in these areas it has made it more and more possible for people to maintain employment and undertake a tree change. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

National auction market softens after drop in Melbourne

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 27 July, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 67.3 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 69.3 per cent last week and 65.3 per cent this time last year. With Sydney recording strong results on a consistent basis the national clearance rate is proving to be variable due to the Melbourne auction market. This is not necessarily a negative sign as results are still stronger than a year ago. Sydney again recorded the strongest preliminary clearance rate, reaching 75.9 per cent compared to 75.2 per cent last week. The consistent strong results should help ensure a spring with plenty of listings as owners will be encouraged to sell. In Melbourne, a preliminary clearance rate of 66.1 per cent was recorded compared to 68.4 per cent last week. The variable results currently being recorded on a weekly basis are not negatively affecting the volume of homes being offered at auction. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 44.2 per cent was recorded compared to 56.9 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 62.8 per cent compared to 69 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 53.1 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 53.8 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

National auction market hits 3 month high

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 27 July, 2014 There are 1,900 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,531 auctions expected compared to only 1,441 for the same period last year. Compared to last week or this week last year capital cities are showing a moderate improvement in key indicators. This is highlighted by the fact that the national clearance rate reached a 3 month high last week. A review of the RP Data Listings Index, which measures forward listings activity, shows a clear rising trend compared to last year. When translated to the auction market this should result in volumes in August and September around 10 to 20 per cent higher than last year. In Melbourne there are 665 auctions scheduled compared to 637 this time last year. In Sydney there are 600 auctions expected compared to 469 for this week last year. Brisbane is expecting 137 auctions, well down on the 220 this week last year. Adelaide is expecting 62 auctions compared to 51 a year ago. Canberra has 37 auctions scheduled compared to 29 a year ago. Perth has 21 auctions compared to 27 a year ago. There are 8 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. For the second week in a row the highest number of auctions across Australia is expected in the northern suburbs of Melbourne where 23 are expected in Reservoir. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist

Inflation adjusted home values are still lower than their previous peak across most cities

According to the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Index, combined capital city home values fell by -0.2% over the second quarter of 2014. With the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS releasing their Consumer Price Index CPI data this week, we can see that in ‘real’ terms home values across the combined capitals fell by -0.7% over the second quarter of the year. CPI is important to consider because raw or nominal figures don’t adjust for the impact of inflation. At a headline level, combined capital city home values have increased by 10.1% over the 2013/14 financial year. The latest CPI data showed that inflation was recorded at 0.5% over the second quarter and at an annual rate of 3.0% throughout the 2013/14 financial year. Focusing on the ‘real’ home value growth across individual capital cities we can see some significant variation in value growth, with values actually falling over the year in some cities. The above chart details the annual change in capital city home values both in terms of raw change and inflation-adjusted changes. Although according to the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Index, dwelling values have risen over the year across all cities, when you adjust for inflation values are lower in real terms in Adelaide, Hobart and Canberra. Not to mention that growth in most other cities starts to look a lot more moderate. Home values have been rising across the combined capital cities since June 2012 following falls over most of the previous two years. Across the individual capital cities the timing and magnitude of the falls has varied greatly however, with values rising across the board, home values generally remain well below their previous peak in real terms across the capitals. In non-inflation adjusted terms home values are higher than their previous peak in: Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra and Perth. Once you account for inflation, Sydney is the only city where values are currently higher than their previous peak. The above table highlights the previous quarter in which home values peaked in inflation adjusted terms, the maximum falls in values and the difference in values from the previous peak to June 2014. As you can see, the previous peaks vary dramatically across each city. As already mentioned, Sydney is the only city where real values are now higher than their previous peak although it’s important to note that Sydney’s previous peak was all the way back in the first quarter of 2004. Perth’s market peaked in September 2007 and values are still -9.9% lower, Hobart peaked in December 2007 and values are currently -18.8% lower and Brisbane peaked in March 2008 with values currently -14.5% lower than that level. Across all other capital cities values are below their peak however, the real peak in values occurred following the financial crisis. It is important to consider the impact of inflation because it highlights the real purchasing power. In most cities, despite extremely low mortgage rates and value growth throughout the past two years values still remain well below their peaks. For home owners this means the real capital gain from residential property have been quite poor in recent years outside of Sydney and Melbourne. For people who don’t yet own a home it means that you should be able to purchase relatively more for you money now than you could at the market peak. The data also shows that interest rates are not necessarily the main driver of why values are currently rising. If that were the case you would probably expect cities where values peaked much longer ago like Brisbane, Perth and Hobart to have recorded stronger levels of growth. Mortgage rates are but one consideration for the home buyer and obviously considerations such as employment, cost of living and housing demand driven through population growth are equal as important of a consideration as mortgage rates when considering whether to purchase or not.

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 27 July, 2014

As volumes rise, there are 665 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 637 for the same time last year. The market returned to trend last week following the aberration the week before. Along with an increase in volumes, demand continues to build slowly in the lead up to spring when buyers will find more choice at auctions and improvement for the range of homes on offer. On a Melbourne-wide basis, the number of days houses are taking to sell by private sale remained above 40 over the last week, higher than was the case over much of summer and autumn. The likelihood of the private sale market tightening substantially will be mitigated by the lack of growth in buyers based on mortgage market activity. Key data Clearance rate week ending 20 July: 68.4 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 27 July: 665 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 20 July: 43 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 20 July: -5.2 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.5 per cent lower in month ending 20 July seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne transaction numbers slowly rising

While it’s often not obvious, a sign of a poorly performing property market can be a low level of residential sales. It reflects a low level of confidence, owners may be reluctant to sell for fear of achieving a low price and buyers may also be reluctant to make the significant commitment that is required when entering into a home loan. Low transactions levels have a range of negative consequences; professions related to property suffer, state government incomes drop and buyers can find it more difficult to find the right home due to a lack of choice which is the reason why the number of transactions is an important metric to follow if you are interested in the state of the market – sometimes it can be even more important than prices. For the Melbourne market, the current level of transactions suggests a healthy market below its peak. The first indication of this is that home values are at a peak in nominal terms but are still around 3 years worth of inflation below their value in real terms. The second indication is that the overall number of settled sales at the end of April was only 1.3 per cent higher than a year ago. This is better than 2012 by a reasonable 4.4 per cent but well below the all-time record in 2007 when there was 105,194 sales in Melbourne and four months into this year we are still 22.2 per cent lower. This data may be surprising to anyone who has seen the record number of auctions this year but as that only accounts for around 31 per cent of sales it can’t provide an accurate picture of the entire market. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

National auction market continues to strengthen

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 20 July, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 70.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 67.2 per cent last week and 64.1 per cent this time last year. Demand in the Sydney market has pushed the national preliminary clearance rate over the 70 per cent mark for the first time since the middle of March this year. Low winter volumes are a factor as the clearance rate recorded its sixth consecutive increase. A preliminary clearance rate of 76.9 per cent was recorded in Sydney compared to 75.6 per cent last week. A clear improvement was seen in Melbourne compared to last week, with a preliminary clearance rate of 69.6 per cent recorded compared to 66.4 per cent last week. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 54.1 per cent was recorded compared to 43.3 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 72.7 per cent compared to 60.9 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 71 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 30 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 20 July, 2014

Sydney clearance rate records 5 consecutive weeks of improvement RP Data auction spokesperson Robert Larocca reports: There are 1,611 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,267 auctions expected compared to only 1,180 for the same period last year. The improving trend recorded on a national level in June and early July was halted last week, largely due to an almost 4 point drop in the clearance rate in Melbourne. In contrast demand in Sydney continues to strengthen and this should encourage more vendors into the market between August and December. In Melbourne there are 590 auctions scheduled compared to 567 last week and 519 this time last year. Auction volumes remain very low in the traditionally strong auction suburbs in the inner east, for instance Hawthorn, Balwyn and Camberwell. The market will change and be tested as they rise over the coming weeks. Sydney continues to record improving results with the clearance rate rising in each of the past 5 weeks. In Sydney there are 452 auctions expected compared to 580 last week and 422 for this week last year. Brisbane is expecting 98 auctions after 118 last week. Adelaide is expecting 59 auctions compared to 85 last week and 59 a year ago. Canberra has 45 auctions scheduled compared to 41 last week. Perth has 15 auctions compared to 24 last week There are 3 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in the northern suburbs of Melbourne where 16 are expected in Reservoir. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 20 July, 2014

There are 590 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 519 for the same time last year. The highest number of auctions is expected in the northern suburbs where 16 are expected in Reservoir. Seasonally low volumes are not only a factor in the auction market with the overall level of new listings also being lower than a year ago. In Melbourne there were 4.9 per cent fewer homes listed for sale over the last month and 8.8 per cent fewer homes overall on the market. Fewer homes on the market than a year ago is a positive sign, especially from a sellers’point of view, however the lower number of new listings may put pressure on prices if it persists and buyer numbers remain at current levels. The average time on market for houses sold last month rose slightly from 40 to 41 days. Similarly, vendor discounting increased from -5.3 per cent the previous week to -5.4 per cent last week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 13 July: 66.4 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 20 July: 590 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 13 July: 41 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 13 July: -5.4 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 1 per cent lower over the month ending 13 July seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

What can be done about the fading hopes of lower income earnerâ

Lower income earner’s hopes of owning a home have faded over the past two years due to the high rate of capital gain, so what can be done? In last week’s RP Data Research Blog I highlighted sales by price point across the capital cities. The data showed a shortening supply of homes selling at lower price points, in particular within some of our largest capital cities. In this week’s Blog I want to investigate what this means for those who don’t already own a home and in particular those that are on lower incomes. The latest quarterly average weekly earnings data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS to November 2013 shows that the average Australian earned $1,114.20 a week. Remember this is the average so plenty of people earn less than this figure which is the equivalent of almost $58,000 a year. Compared to many other countries, Australia’s average wage is quite high however, so too is the cost of living in Australia and in particular the cost of housing as highlighted last week. With a combined capital city median house price of $580,000 and median unit price of $482,000 an average income is not going to go a long way. But why is the capital city median price more relevant than the nationwide median which is $490,000 and $440,000 for houses and units respectively? Well it comes down to the fact that you generally need to be employed to secure a mortgage and work towards owning a home. The latest labour force data from the ABS shows that Australia had 11.578 million employed persons as at June 2014. With a 6.0% unemployment rate the total size of the workforce, or to put it another way the number of people with employment or actively looking for employment, is 12.320 million. For myriad reasons a proportion of the population is not actively working or looking for work at any given time. As at June 2014 the employment participation rate was 64.7% meaning that for whatever reason there are an estimated 4.349 million people over 15 years of age that are not actively working or looking for work. The 2011 Census reported that at that time there were 21.504 million Australian’s living across the six states and NT and ACT. At that time, 65.6% of Australian’s or 14.1 million lived in a capital city. A slightly higher 67.4% of persons reported as being in the workforce working or actively looking for work lived in a capital city. In fact, 58.2% of people in the workforce lived in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane or Perth. If we think how this impacts lower income earners and their prospects of entering into home ownership it’s not simply a case that they can move to another city where housing is more affordable. Unfortunately in Australia, jobs, particularly well-paying jobs, are largely located in a handful of major capital cities or on mining sites in the middle of nowhere. The reality of moving to another capital city or to a regional area where housing is cheaper is not a realistic prospect for many low income earners. As I showed in last week’s blog there are still opportunities to purchase lower priced homes across the capital cities however, these opportunities are becoming fewer. If you look at where these lower priced sales are occurring, for houses they are typically located on the outskirts of the city. Houses on the outskirts of cities, particularly the major capital cities, are inherently cheaper because they are often less desirable than those in well-established suburbs closer to the city centre although not always . Although housing is cheaper in these areas the cost of doing day-to-day tasks is more expensive. If you work in the city, the cost of public transport is higher and if you choose to drive you lose hours in traffic, not to mention the additional cost of fuel and road tolls. Local amenities such as shops, schools and health care tend to not be as abundant in outer suburbs as they are closer to the city centre so it will take residents of these areas longer to access these amenities too. Although housing may be more affordable within the outer suburbs, it won’t necessarily make it easier for some lower income earners to afford a mortgage when they factor in all the additional costs of living in that location. Lower priced housing stock is also available within the unit market however, this too has its shortcomings. There are becoming fewer lower priced units available in areas closer to city centres. Unit prices are still generally much lower than that of houses although, most of the newer stock comes with a relatively high price tag these days. Of course units are also much smaller than a house and you tend to get less in terms of area for your money. While a unit may be practical when your single, a couple or have young children, they become less practical if/when the situation changes and the size of the family grows. Units also don’t offer the same level of freedom as a house with limitations generally in place with regard to what you can and can’t do both within and to your unit. Although when you own a home you have to pay for upkeep, in a unit complex you have to contribute strata levies each quarter the cost of which can at times be exorbitant. So what realistic option does the person on a lower income have? Of course housing should be cheaper on the outskirts of the city and it is but even still a lot of lower income earners are not in a position to purchase. This is partly because although housing is cheaper a mortgage is still going to swallow up a sizeable chunk of their income not to mention the other costs associated with living on the outskirts of the city. The commonly recommended solution is to remove urban growth boundaries and cut fees and charges on new developments which would theoretically increase supply and therefore bring down the cost of housing. But I wonder by how much would it really reduce the cost and would it be significant enough to allow lower income earners to purchase. I think possibly not and here’s why. It’s not simply a case that we can fix housing affordability by building more and more homes, if that was the case, lower income earners could just move to a more affordable city. The issue is more to do with employment and specifically where the jobs are located. Even on the outskirts of the capital cities the cost of public transport and fuel will still eat up a sizeable chunk of lower income earners salaries. If residents on the outskirts still have to travel to get to their jobs which often they will they will often encounter a number of hurdles. Firstly public transport is often woefully insufficient in these areas. Anyone who has travelled overseas will know that public transport in our larger capital cities is not of a particularly high standard. The other thing with public transport is that it caters much better to those people living closer to the city centre and transport upgrades often benefit inner city dwellers much more than it benefits those on the outskirts of the city, the ones that need it the most. Secondly, the road network also tends to be insufficient on the outskirts of the cities unable to cope with the growing population. This is due to the fact that Governments tend to put the onus of building the roads on the developers and will often not provide the major roads to a new housing area until such time as it is absolutely critical. Developing the roads before the housing would make these areas much more attractive and accessible. If we can’t provide sufficient public transport and roads to the housing areas on the outskirts of the city, the greatest assistance we can provide when developing these areas is to accompany this residential development with local jobs for these workers. Travelling to work does not become such an issue for low income earners on the outskirts of a capital city if they can find employment locally. Not to mention it is imperative to bring amenities such as shops, schools and health care closer by. If this were to occur, public transport and investment in new major roads becomes not as vital as it is currently when there are so few employment opportunities locally. If lower income earners aren’t lumped with the additional burdens of significant public transport, fuel and road toll costs to get to their employment then the burden of a mortgage whilst still difficult does not become a virtual impossibility. So yes, affordable housing is becoming harder to find in our capital cities and yes, increasing supply of housing will help to improve the opportunities to purchase homes at a lower price. However, local employment drivers and amenities I believe are just as important especially seeing as time and time again we have seen insufficient investment in public transport and road infrastructure on the outskirts of the cities. Not to mention that the cost of utilising public transport is extremely restrictive. Alternatively we should forget pie in the sky proposals such as fast trains between Brisbane and Melbourne and improve the rail network locally. Each of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane could use a more expansive rail networks which includes more stations, better linkages to suburbs on the outskirts and faster connections between nearby cities. Investing in improving links and train speeds to the Central Coast, Newcastle, Wollongong, the Blue Mountains and Bathurst from Sydney, to Geelong, Ballarat and Bendigo from Melbourne and to the Gold and Sunshine Coasts and Toowoomba from Brisbane would no doubt be a much more worthwhile investment.

Best suburbs in Melbourne for capital growth within 20k of CBD

Analysis of changes in the median value of houses in suburbs within 20k of the CBD over the medium term shows some interesting trends. In order to smooth out some of the volatility present in the short term this analysis focuses on median value growth over a five year period. The data shows that owners at a range of price points and locations have recorded very healthy increases in value. There are three suburbs with median values in excess of $1 million in the top ten list based on median value growth over the past five years. These three suburbs, Hawthorn East, Middle Park and Ashburton have all recorded a rise in median values of more than 45 per cent over the five years to May 2014. Hawthorn East tops the list with an increase of 78 per cent over the past 5 years, but is followed by a much more affordable location in second place. Watsonia recorded a 63 per cent rise and with a median house value less than a third of Hawthorn East, this shows good capital growth can be found at a range of price points. Third on the list is Derrimut, however as a growth suburb underlying values are driven by new home development across the suburb. Fourth on the list is Pascoe Vale South with a 54 per cent rise. It is a suburb which is undergoing significant change and is seeing values boosted by the good transport options and well-sized blocks. Other suburbs on the list can be seen below but it is worth highlighting Northcote, as it is representative of the gentrification underway in the inner north of Melbourne. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

More auctions and more sales in capital cities than a year ago

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 13 July, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 68.7 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 68.9 per cent last week and 67.7 per cent this time last year. Sydney provided the highest clearance rate and when combined with the higher volumes in Melbourne resulted in another solid week. This week a preliminary clearance rate of 76.4 per cent was recorded in Sydney compared to 72.4 per cent last week. Sellers with auctions scheduled in spring will welcome the strong result this week. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 67 per cent recorded compared to 71.4 per cent last week. The market has built a solid basis for spring and continues to offer buyers good opportunity. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 47 per cent was recorded compared to 59.5 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 62.3 per cent compared to 64.6 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 64.3 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 75 per cent. In Tasmania 1 auction resulted in sales from the 4 held. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

May 2014 Housing Finance Data

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released housing finance data for May 2014 late last week with the data showing owner occupier housing finance commitments flat over the month. The data also showed that the total value of housing finance commitments was -0.8% lower over the month. Although this may be concerning, the number of housing finance commitments remain high and even if we have reached the summit, the RBA would probably be happy were commitments to remain at these current levels. Over the month of May there were 52,092 owner occupier housing finance commitments, 17,463 of which were refinances and 34,630 which were non-refinances or new loans. Refinance commitments were 2.1% higher over the month and are 10.1% higher year-on-year. New loan commitments were -1.0% lower in May and are only 2.0% higher over the month. Refinance commitments are at their highest level since April 2008 while new loan commitments are -2.5% lower than their recent peak in November 2013. Although owner occupier housing finance commitments are higher over the year they do seem to be at or very close to a peak. In May there was $27.5 billion worth of housing finance commitments which was slightly lower than the all-time peak of $27.7 billion the previous month. Over the month, owner occupier refinance commitments were up 0.8%, owner occupier new loans were -1.4% lower and investment finance commitments were -0.9% lower. Despite weaker results over the month, year-on-year there have been some significant increases with owner occupier refinances 17.7% higher, owner occupier new loans 8.3% higher and investment loans up 23.8%. Again the rate of increase has definitely slowed of late potentially pointing to a peak. Looking at how much housing lending each component is attracting, the data shows that in May 2014, 42.9% of lending was to owner occupiers for new loans, 18.0% was for refinances by owner occupiers and 39.1% is for investment purposes. As a proportion of total lending in May, owner occupier non-refinance commitments are at their lowest level on record while refinances are at their highest level since July 2013 and investment lending remains at around its highest level since late 2003. The pick-up in investment and refinance lending has caused the proportional fall in owner occupier non-refinance lending. If we exclude lending for refinances, 52.4% of lending over the month was for owner occupiers while 47.6% was for investors. This was equal to the second highest level of lending for investment purposes, behind the 49.0% of all loans to investors in October 2003. Lending finance data released by the ABS on Monday for May 2014 revealed that investor activity is significantly higher in New South Wales than in all other states. Nevertheless, New South Wales 29.9% , Victoria 22.5% , Queensland 7.8% and South Australia 2.1% have each recorded a year-on-year rise in investment lending. Investment housing finance commitments account for an historic high 46.9% of all housing finance commitments in New South Wales and elsewhere the proportions are recorded at: Victoria 39.1% , Queensland 34.4% , South Australia 31.5% , Western Australia 31.0% , Tasmania 13.8% , Northern Territory 40.2% and the Australia Capital Territory 33.9% . The data shows that although investment levels are generally rising it is much more exacerbated in New South Wales and Victoria which are of course proxies for rising investment in Sydney and Melbourne. Interestingly when we track the annual change in the value of housing finance commitments, excluding refinances to reflect home sales we can see that it correlates closely with the annual change in combined capital city home values. The recent slower rate of growth in capital city home values is happening in concert with a slowdown in the growth in housing finance commitments. The housing finance data also shows that first home buyers continue to play only a minor role in the housing market. In May, the number of owner occupier first home buyer commitments was up 17.1% over the month however, as a proportion of total owner occupier lending activity it remains quite low at just 12.6%. Across the individual states, the level of activity by first home buyers remains very low in the three largest states New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland . Elsewhere the percentage of owner occupier housing finance commitments for first home buyers is lower now than at the same time last year except in Tasmania and the Northern Territory. Looking ahead, the RP Data Mortgage Index RMI indicates a slowing of demand for mortgages in June. With value growth seemingly having peaked and transaction volumes lower than they were late in 2013 we anticipate that demand for housing finance is likely to remain at fairly similar levels to those current over the coming months. The real test from here will be throughout the spring selling season when housing demand typically escalates. With affordability factors anticipated to slow the rate of value growth we may also see slightly lower levels of mortgage demand. As we have noted plenty of times previously, rental yields are generally low which suggests that most investors are seeking capital growth. This is further highlighted by the high levels of investment activity in New South Wales and Victoria with Sydney and Melbourne having recorded the greatest increases in home values across the capital cities over the past year. The test will be once the value growth in the market abates what then happens with all these investor owned properties? Do they wait it out for the next growth phase or do they exit the market and move to a more liquid asset class? Only time will tell but it is certainly something which lenders and regulators should be considering with such a high level of investment lending currently taking place.

National clearance rate rising in winter

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 13 July, 2014 RP Data auction spokesperson Robert Larocca reports: There are 1,613 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. In capital cities there are 1,268 auctions expected compared to only 984 for the same period last year. Over the past three weeks the national clearance rate has shown a rising trend with a 3.5 point rise recorded. If this trend continues it will result in a return to the 70 per cent clearance rates last recorded in February and early March on the eve of spring. In Melbourne there are 527 auctions scheduled compared to 549 last week and 426 this time last year. The clearance rate exceeded 70 per cent last week however with the consumer confidence index trending down and still below 100, the market will be tested as volumes rise over the next two months. In Sydney there are 497 auctions expected compared to 597 last week and only 378 for this week last year. The rising trend apparent in the market nationally is also the case in Sydney, which has seen a consistent 5-point rise over the past 5 weeks and reflects improving confidence levels. Brisbane is expecting 103 auctions following 126 last week. Consistent with Sydney and Melbourne there is a rise in volumes on a year ago when there were 78 auctions. Adelaide is expecting 79 auctions compared to 83 last week and only 47 a year ago. Canberra has 38 auctions scheduled compared to 43 last week. Perth has 22 auctions compared to 34 last week There are 6 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in the Sunshine Coast where 12 auctions are scheduled in Buderim. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 13 July, 2014

There are 527 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 426 for the same time last year. The Melbourne market has been delivering consistent results for sellers in the past 4 weeks with very little change in the weekly clearance rate. A review of the change in house values on a suburban basis shows that the largest increase over the last year was found mainly in inner city suburbs. Middle Park, Hawthorn East, Braybrook, Balwyn North and Praharan comprised the top 5 with changes in median value of between 43.2 per cent and 24 per cent. For apartments the top 5 included Caulfield East, Middle Park, Canterbury, Flemington and Spotswood. The average time on market for houses sold last month rose sharply from 35 to 40 days despite average discounting being stable at -5.3 per cent over the previous week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 6 July: 71.4 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 13 July: 527 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 6 July: 40 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 6 July: -5.3 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.5 per cent lower in month ending 6 July seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Fewer homes selling at lower price points as value growth surges

There’s no doubt about it, housing is becoming more expensive as home values rise. The escalation in the cost of housing is forcing households to spend more to purchase a home; subsequently the deposit is also higher forcing many first home buyers to wait until later in life to purchase a home or consider a more affordable location/housing type than what they would have previously accepted. Looking at the combined capital cities, over the 12 months to April 2014, home sales between $400,000 and $600,000 accounted for the greatest proportion of sales of houses and units at 34.5%. Home sales of properties priced between $200,000 and $400,000 accounted for the second largest proportion 26.8% followed by: $600,000 to $800,000 17.2% , $1 million to $2 million 9.2% , $800,000 to $1 million 8.2% , Less than $200,000 2.2% and $2 million or greater 2.0% . Over the past 12 months there has been almost as many capital city home sales over $2 million than there have been below $200,000. Clearly low income earners are finding it increasingly difficult to purchase homes in capital cities. The above chart shows the proportion of capital city home sales by price point over time. The emerging trend is the sharp decline in sales under $200,000 over time and the recent decline in sales of homes priced between $200,000 and $400,000. As you’d expect, sales which previously occurred within these two price points are pushing higher with an increasing prominence of sales between $400,000 and $600,000 and $600,000 and $800,000. Obviously across capital cities the performances are much more varied across individual price points and it is important to analyse the emerging trends. Across the combined capital cities, sales of homes for less than $200,000 accounted for just 2.2% of all sales. Across the individual capital cities the proportions were: Sydney 1.7% , Melbourne 1.5% , Brisbane 2.4% , Adelaide 6.0% , Perth 1.4% , Hobart 13.5% , Darwin 4.8% and Canberra 0.9% . It is extremely noticeable that there has been a deterioration in the availability of homes for less than $200,000. Even in relatively more affordable capital cities like Adelaide and Hobart, the proportion of sales below $200,000 is low. In fact, in Sydney and Melbourne there have been more sales over $2 million throughout the year than sales below $200,000. 26.8% of all home sales across the combined capital cities were between $200,000 and $400,000 over the 12 months to April 2014. At the individual capital city region, the proportions were recorded at: Sydney 17.3% , Melbourne 29.1% , Brisbane 37.7% , Adelaide 48.4% , Perth 19.8% , Hobart 54.3% , Darwin 19.8% and Canberra 20.0% . In Adelaide and Hobart, the greatest proportion of sales over the year occurred at this price point. In each city, the proportion of sales occurring between $200,000 and $400,000 is falling, highlighting the shortening supply of capital city homes available at more affordable price points. In Sydney for example, more properties transacted for more than $1 million 18.9% than sold for between $200,000 and $400,000. Capital city homes sold between $400,000 and $600,000 accounted for the greatest proportion of total sales, making up 34.5% of sales over the 12 months to April 2014. In Sydney, home sales priced between $400,000 and $600,000 accounted for 29.6% of sales over the year. Elsewhere the proportion of sales between $400,000 and $600,000 were recorded at: Melbourne 33.9% , Brisbane 38.3% , Adelaide 30.1% , Perth 43.2% , Hobart 23.3% , Darwin 41.5% and Canberra 51.7% . In each city other than Adelaide and Hobart the $400,000 to $600,000 price point has recorded the greatest number of sales over the year. Interestingly, in Sydney, Melbourne and Darwin the proportion of sales within this price point is trending lower, further indicating affordability constraints in these cities. Over the 12 months to April 2014, 17.2% of capital city homes sold transacted at a price point between $600,000 and $800,000. Across the capital cities, the proportion of total sales within this price point was recorded at: Sydney 20.5% , Melbourne 17.0% , Brisbane 13.1% , Adelaide 9.2% , Perth 19.0% , Hobart 5.8% , Darwin 23.3% and Canberra 18.1% . Across all capital cities, the proportion of sales occurring between $600,000 and $800,000 has increased over the past year. 8.2% of capital city home sales were at a price between $800,000 and $1 million over the past year, increasing from 6.7% a year earlier. At an individual capital city level, the proportion of sales was recorded at: Sydney 15.3% , Melbourne 8.0% , Brisbane 4.6% , Adelaide 3.2% , Perth 7.8% , Hobart 1.7% , Darwin 5.8% and Canberra 5.7% . Like the $600,000 to $800,000 price point, the proportion of sales sitting within this price point has risen over the year across each capital city. Across the combined capital cities, there were more home sales between $1 million and $2 million 9.2% than there were sales below $200,000 2.2% over the 12 months to April 2014. The proportion of homes sold for between $1 million and $2 million rose across each city except Hobart over the past year. At an individual city level, the proportion of sales between $1 million and $2 million was recorded at: Sydney 15.3% , Melbourne 8.8% , Brisbane 3.4% , Adelaide 2.5% , Perth 7.6% , Hobart 1.2% , Darwin 3.5% and Canberra 3.1% . The data shows that Sydney, Melbourne and Perth are the key drivers between the rising proportion of sales between $1 million and $2 million. Ten years ago just 2.5% of capital city home sales were at a price between $1 million and $2 million. 2.0% of capital city home sales over the 12 months to April 2014 were at or more than $2 million which was the greatest proportion on record. Across individual capital cities, the proportions were recorded at: Sydney 3.5% , Melbourne 1.9% , Brisbane 0.6% , Adelaide 0.5% , Perth 1.3% , Hobart 0.3% , Darwin 1.4% and Canberra 0.5% . Ten years ago just 0.7% of capital city home sales were at or more than $2 million. The data presented highlights the impact of home value growth with fewer lower priced properties selling in the capital cities particularly in markets like Sydney and Melbourne . Although the analysis is interesting at a capital city level, individual areas and suburbs and regions can be very different across broad areas like capital cities. Given this, it is important when selling or buying to understand where the property sits in the context of the local and broader market. Often times purchasers won’t be looking exclusively in one suburb so an understanding of what areas offer a similar price point may help when selling especially if the subject property is in a suburb which offers advantages over other areas. Keep in mind that this analysis has been undertaken across the dwelling market i.e. it is looking at a combination of houses and units . Units are becoming an increasingly popular alternative to houses in many cities because they are generally more affordable and offer the opportunity to live in a more desirable location than a house would at the same price point. Now more than ever buyers are likely to be comparing the cost of a unit or townhouse to the cost of a detached house. This is a point that should be clear to buyers and sellers of any property, particularly as affordability constraints and a subsequent shortening supply of more affordable capital city housing stock grows.

Does land size matter?

The impact of land size on the value of and demand for a property is an interesting question. Analysis of RP Data information comparing the sale price with the land area shows that location is still more important than size when comparing suburbs. After all, a block of land that is twice the size and twice the distance from the amenities you desire is not likely to be as appealing as a well-located smaller one. The value per square metre of houses in Melbourne’s million dollar suburbs demonstrates this. Toorak is the city’s most expensive suburb for houses with a median sale price over the last year of $2.622m. The average block size is however quite large at 8232m which translates to a cost of $3,187 per sqm. Interestingly, this is lower than the $6,274 in Albert Park and $6,074 in Middle Park and the median sale price is less than half that of Toorak These two neighbouring suburbs have, compared to Toorak, very expensive land but this is more a factor of the small block sizes, at 2092m and 2592m respectively. At the other end of the spectrum is Ivanhoe East, a highly sought after suburb with a median sale price of $1.15m; it has slightly larger blocks than Toorak at an average of 9692m, again highlighting that location is the most critical factor. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Buyers drive up national clearance rate in week of low volumes

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 6 July, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 69.4 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 66.6 per cent last week and 65.1 per cent this time last year. Prior to this weekend the national year to date clearance rate was 67.3 per cent. This is very healthy compared to the 63.2 per cent recorded last year and in 2012 when less than half of all auctions resulted in sales when the clearance rates was 49.1 per cent. This week a preliminary clearance rate of 74.6 per cent was recorded in Sydney, a significant rise on the 71.1 per cent last week. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 68.4 per cent recorded compared to 68.3 per cent last week. The Melbourne market has been delivering very consistent results for sellers in the past 4 weeks. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 59.3 per cent was recorded compared to 42.2 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 75.6 per cent compared to 62.7 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 48.4 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 52.6 per cent. In Tasmania 2 auctions resulted in sales from the 6 held. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Winter and school holidays affect auction volumes

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 6 July, 2014 RP Data auction spokesperson Robert Larocca reports: There are 1,651 auctions scheduled across Australia this week. Across the capital cities there are 1,322 auctions expected compared to 1,029 to the same period last year. Generally, the first two weekends in July is the midyear low point of the national auction market, all brought about by cooler weather and school holidays which combine to create a lull in the market. Buyers experiencing difficulty in finding an appropriate home for sale right now will find that by the end of August volumes should be around double what they currently are. In Sydney there are 558 auctions expected compared to 861 last week. The clearance rate for the first six months of this year was 74.4 per cent indicating the market has been slightly below trend for the last month. In Melbourne there are 497 auctions scheduled compared to 811 last week. The clearance rate for the first six months of the year has been 67 per cent with the past three weeks showing an improvement to trend. Brisbane is expecting 115 auctions following 153 last week. Adelaide is expecting 75 auctions compared to 79 last week. Canberra has 38 auctions scheduled compared to 35 last week. Perth has 30 auctions compared to 39 last week There are 9 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in St Kilda VIC and Surry Hills NSW , each of which has 10 scheduled. Robert Larocca RP Data Auction Market Specialist

May 2014 dwelling approvals

Not long before the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released building approvals data for May 2014, the Reserve Bank Governor RBA Glenn Stevens completed a presentation in Hobart. Within that presentation Glenn Stevens stated “It would in my opinion be good, for a range of reasons, if it did persist for a while. If the next couple of years saw an unremarkable performance on prices, and construction staying at the higher levels that will clearly be reached over the coming year, it would be an outcome that would contribute to a balanced growth path for the economy and to housing more people at manageable cost.” This was made in the knowledge that home values rose by 10.1% over the 20-13/14 financial year and following three consecutive monthly falls in dwelling approvals between February and April 2014. Luckily the May data which was released earlier today showed a 9.9% rise over the month. Dwelling approvals are now 14.3% higher year-on-year. After three consecutive monthly falls in dwelling approvals it was looking as if the much vaunted rebound in housing construction was running out of puff approval is the initial step before construction can commence . Of course, we don’t want to get too carried away with a one month bounce but it was encouraging to see that the fall in dwelling approvals has, at least for the moment, not continued. Total dwelling approvals in May were 14.3% higher than a year ago with house approvals 14.0% higher and unit approvals 14.5% higher. The data is inherently volatile on a month-to-month basis so I like to also note the annual number of dwelling approvals. Over the 12 months to May 2014, there were 191,088 total dwelling approvals, 107,291 of which were for houses and 83,799 which were for units. The annual number of dwelling approvals is at their highest level since there were 192,614 dwelling approvals over the 12 months to December 1994. Let’s not understate this; the rebound in dwelling approvals is strong and much needed after years of ongoing insufficient supply additions. The challenge from here will be what proportion of these approvals actually end up moving to construction and then ultimately completion. Focussing on the capital cities, it is encouraging that there has been a significant rise in dwelling approvals across these areas where supply issues are generally most dire. On a rolling annual basis, there were 141,845 capital city dwelling approvals over the 12 months to May 2014. Of these approvals, 68,455 were for houses while 73,390 were for units. Note that at a national level dwelling approvals for houses still outnumber units however units outnumber houses in the capital cities highlighting the direction that new development is heading in most of our capital cities. The annual number of capital city house approvals as at May 2014 was 19.6% higher than over the corresponding 12 month period in 2013. Capital city house approvals are at their highest level since the 12 months to February 2011 when 69,524 houses were approved. Capital city unit approvals are 23.4% higher than they were a year earlier and are only slightly lower than their record high level of 73,835 unit approvals over the 12 months to March 2014. Across individual capital cities the annual number of dwelling approvals is higher across each city except for Darwin. The greatest annual lift in dwelling approvals has been recorded in Brisbane and Sydney. Anyone that has visited either of these cities recently would have seen plenty of residential construction taking place and it seems that there is a significant additional pipeline of residential construction to come. As you can see from the above chart, across each of the major capital cities there has been an upswing in dwelling approvals. The most significant upswing has occurred in Sydney and Brisbane however, the number of approvals remains much higher in Sydney and Melbourne than in all other cities. The number of dwellings approved for construction is at an all-time high currently in Perth, is very close to its record high in Sydney and at its highest level since the 12 months to June 2004 in Brisbane. We mentioned earlier about the shift towards unit approvals as opposed to house approvals which is much more prominent in capital cities than nationwide. The above chart highlights the proportion of dwelling approvals which are for units as opposed to houses over time. As already noted over the 12 months to May 2014, 51.7% of all capital city dwelling approvals were for units. In Sydney 69.4% , Melbourne 52.4% , Brisbane 57.2% , Darwin 58.6% and Canberra 62.9% a majority of approvals are for units rather than houses. In the remaining three cities 31.1% of approvals are for units in Adelaide, 23.9% in Perth and 13.6% in Hobart. I have little doubt that particularly in Perth we will see a growing proportion of approvals for units rather than houses over the coming years. The May dwelling approvals data showed an encouraging rebound following three consecutive monthly falls. Keep in mind that Glenn Stevens wants to see higher construction levels over the next few years and that will be the real challenge. If consumer sentiment continues to languish and if and when home value growth slows there will be much less certainty around the viability of new residential developments. Maintaining high levels of new residential approvals and construction over the next few years will be no easy feat.

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 6 July 2014

There are 497 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 453 for the same time last year. Across the city, the number of homes listed for auction is temporarily impacted by the school holidays, especially in the eastern suburbs. Interestingly, the private sale market in those suburbs is recording very healthy results. Eastern suburbs comprises of a majority of the top 10 suburbs ranked by vendor discounting for houses sold by private sale over the most recent 12 month period. For example, Oakleigh, Bayswater North, Box Hill, Ashwood and Box Hill South all recorded an average vendor discount of less than 3 per cent, well below the majority of other suburbs in Melbourne. This is reflective of the city-wide private sale market more recently. The average time on market for houses sold over the last month may have risen slightly to 35 from 34 days, however, vendors did not suffer as their average discounting contracted to -5.3 from -5.6 per cent over the previous week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 29 June: 68.3 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 6 July: 497 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 29 June: 35 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 29 June: -5.3 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.8 per cent higher in month ending 29 June seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne dwelling values show variable but moderate growth in 2014

According to the RP Data Rismark June home value results released today, Melbourne dwelling values rose by 1.8 per cent over June but are still lower over the quarter with a 2.4 per cent fall. This further highlights some very short term variability against a stable background with a 2.9 per cent rise over the first half of the year. Melbourne is showing all the signs of a stable but shallow growth phase with a 14.2 per cent rise over this cycle. The market is well-placed for spring, well ahead of any of the previous three years. The data shows that this is less of a roller coaster ride than the last two cycles in 2007 and 2010 and is therefore likely to be more sustainable. House values rose by 1.7 per cent in the month and by 3.3 per cent this year compared to a rise of 2.7 per cent for units which have shown zero growth this year. The median sale price from settled sales in the quarter was $630,000 for houses and $468,000 for units. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Property market myths and common facts; Melbourne

Quite often, myths or commonly accepted facts about the property market can turn out to be incorrect when a review of the actual numbers is conducted. Do people really buy and sell every 7 years? It’s often said that most home owners buy and sell every seven years, however, research shows that in Melbourne the average hold period for houses is 11.4 years and for units 9.5 years. While the hold period differs from suburb to suburb, there are a number that match the commonly accepted seven years. In Melbourne these include Pakenham, Narre Warren South, Burnley and St Kilda West. Some of the shortest hold periods for property ownership are in the city’s newest suburbs such as Lyndhurst, Dorren and Truganina where the average hold period for a house is around 4 years. At the other end of the spectrum is Vermont South with a hold period of 18.2 years. Is it true that houses double in value every decade? The answer to this question highlights that sometimes timing is everything in real estate. The RP Data Home Value index for houses in Melbourne shows values doubled in just over 7 years between February 2003 and October 2010 however, the same scenario occurred over 11 years between February 2003 and May this year. Do rents always rise? It seems that rents are often always rising when in fact they may not be. The reality is that it all depends on balance of demand and supply in the relevant suburb. For instance, over the past five years advertised rents for houses in Toorak, Dorren and Mernda have decreased. While in Clayton, Oakleigh and Eltham they have risen by no more than 1 per cent per annum. There are many more that have risen over this time including the popular suburb of Northcote where rents have risen by 28 per cent over 5 years. Houses sell for more than the advertised cost – but do they? A popular topic over dinner tables and in the press is the relationship between advertised prices for houses at auction and the sale price. The main view is that the sale price always exceeds the advertised price. Less often discussed is the fact that most homes sell for less than their advertised price. Around 70 per cent of homes sell by private sale and are usually sold for around 6 per cent below the initial advertised price. However, this does vary across the city with the discount being 8 per cent in Springvale, and 4 per cent in Yarraville. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Capital city auction numbers rise 38 per cent

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 29 June, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 68.1 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 65.4 per cent last week and 66.9 per cent this time last year. Based on the auctions conducted in the first six months of this year volumes have risen by a remarkable 38 per cent since 2013. More people are selling homes by auction this year and this is a sign of a market that is performing well and delivering results for sellers and buyers. Sydney continues to see the highest rates of sale at auction. This week a preliminary clearance rate of 73.2 per cent was recorded compared to 70.1 per cent last week. The improvements in the Melbourne market over the last few weeks have been sustained with a preliminary clearance rate of 69.3 per cent recorded compared to 69.1 per cent last week. In Brisbane, a preliminary clearance rate of 43.9 per cent was recorded compared to 32.2 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 66.7 per cent compared to 59.7 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 63.6 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 50 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist 0409 198 350

Scheduled auctions in Sydney exceed those in Melbourne

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 29 June, 2014 There are 2,169 auctions scheduled across Australia this week across 1,137 different suburbs or towns. In capital cities there are 1,769 auctions expected compared to 1,572 to the same period last year. The overall national auction market is displaying a very consistent performance right now with stable clearance rates. Compared to this week last year, the only significant difference is in volumes with a significant rise expected in Sydney. With the exception of weeks that are affected by public holidays or very low volumes, this is also the first time Sydney has had more auctions than Melbourne for the year. This would have been inconceivable a year ago. In Sydney there are 758 auctions expected compared to 785 last week. Whilst similar to last week, it is significant to note that this is 27.6 per cent more than last year. In Melbourne there are 728 auctions scheduled compared to 946 last week. The Melbourne auction market appears to be improving with the clearance rate being close to 70 per cent in the last fortnight. Brisbane has 132 expected auctions following 141 last week Adelaide has 72 expected auctions compared to 74 last week Canberra has 33 scheduled auctions compared to the 35 last week Perth has 36 auctions compared to 45 last week There are 10 auctions scheduled in Tasmania Across Australia, the highest number of auctions is expected in Preston VIC and Randwick NSW , both of which have 14. Overall volumes are also high in the northern suburbs of Melbourne as Reservoir, which neighbors Preston has 13 auctions Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 29 June, 2014

There are 728 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 719 for the same time last year. The highest number of auctions are expected in the northern suburbs of Melbourne this week with 14 scheduled in Preston and 13 in neighbouring Reservoir. The Melbourne auction market appears to be improving with the clearance rate being close to 70 per cent last fortnight. That is compared to the clearance rate of 67.6 per cent this year from 18,657 auctions whilst last year the comparative number was 68.45 per cent from 14,226 auctions. The average time on market for houses sold at private sale tightened from 35 to 34 days. Vendor discounting softened slightly over the week, to -5.6 per cent, compared to -5.5 per cent over the previous week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 29 June: 69.1 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 29 June: 728 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 22 June: 34 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 22 June: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 1.8 per cent higher in month ending 22 June seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Three out of ten properties sold by auction in Melbourne

Last year Melbourne saw 30.5 per cent of sales by auction compared to 21.1 per cent for the previous year. The proportion of sales by auction tends to follow the market; rising when prices and demand increases and falling in soft markets. Early indications this year are showing that new records are likely to be set. At the end of the March quarter, 30.6 per cent of sales were by auction compared to 21 per cent last year, and the previous high of 20.8 per cent in 2010. Due to a lack of auctions in January and a slow start to February, the proportion of sales by auction always rises as the year goes on. The same will be the case this year, especially in light of the records reached in May refer to recent blog . This means we are likely to see a significant shift in selling methods towards auctions this year. This would be unprecedented because price growth and clearance rates are lower than in other years when this occurred. The data points towards a shift in auctions as a selling method by Melbourne real estate agents, and one that vendors are clearly agreeing with. This may be due to research which shows that even if you fail to find a buyer at the auction, there is a high likelihood you will within 4 weeks. The data shows that within 4 weeks of the auction, the proportion of homes sold rises to around 80 per cent as sellers negotiate with buyers after the conclusion of the auction. This shows that the concentrated marketing and ‘sale date’ associated with an auction campaign helps ensure a timely sale. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Auction market stable across capital cities

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 22 June, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 66.6 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 65.5 per cent last week and 66 per cent this time last year. A medium term review of the national auction market shows stable performance after a period of appreciation in 2013 and the previous two years when the clearance rate was at comparatively soft levels of 44.7 per cent in 2011 and 54.1 per cent in 2012. In the Sydney market a preliminary clearance rate of 71.9 per cent was recorded compared to 69.3 per cent last week. The stability present nationally is especially the case in Sydney where the clearance rate has shown little variance over the last three months with high of 76.1 per cent and low of 67.3 per cent. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 69.1 per cent recorded compared to 69.2 per cent last week. Last week was the best result in three months and it has been matched this week as volumes remain strong. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 38.1 per cent was recorded compared to 43.5 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 58.8 per cent compared to 52.3 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 65.4 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 30 per cent. In Tasmania 4 homes sold from 9 auctions. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Unemployment peaks lower than forecast on lower participation

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS recently published labour force statistics for May 2014. The data reported that the national unemployment rate was steady at 5.8%, the 3rd month in a row it had been recorded at this level. The rate of unemployment is up from 5.5% a year ago but still well below the 6.25% many had predicted it would have reached by now. The full-time unemployment rate at a national level is slightly higher than the overall unemployment rate, recorded at 6.0%. Although we have seen a fairly stable unemployment rate of late, the employment participation rate is continuing to trend lower. A key challenge for the Government is to encourage the long-term unemployed persons back into the workforce. Although the participation rate data suggests that this may not be working, keep in mind also that with an ageing population more and more baby boomers are reaching retirement age and exiting the workforce. The current workforce participation rate is recorded at 64.6% which is at around its lowest level since March 2006. Turning to actual employment, in May 2014 there was 11,564,555 persons employed nationally, 8,068,338 employed full-time and 3,496,216 employed part-time. As at May 2014, 30.2% of all employed persons were employed part-time. As you would expect, females are much more likely to be employed on a part-time basis compared to males. As at May 2014, 16.9% of total males employed were employed part-time compared to 45.9% of females employed. Although the proportion of males employed part-time is much lower than females it has been trending higher and is close to an historic high. Over the 12 months to May 2014, the number of employed persons has increased by 98,700 persons with a 49,700 person increase in full-time employment and a 49,000 person increase in part-time employment. At the same time a year ago, total employment had increased by 102,900 persons with full-time employment increasing by 22,100 persons and part-time employment rising by 80,700 persons. The national data highlights that the unemployment rate has seemed to have stabilised over recent months and jobs continue to be created however, the data at a state level is somewhat more varied. Based on the less volatile trend data, Tasmania has the nation’s highest unemployment rate at 7.5% and the Northern Territory the lowest at 3.3%. As you can see there is a big discrepancy in unemployment on a state by state basis. Looking at the current tend unemployment rate compared to trend unemployment a year ago we can see some different trends across the states. New South Wales was the only state where there was no change to unemployment over the year, steady at 5.5%. The unemployment rate rose in Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia with the largest increases in Victoria and South Australia. In Tasmania, Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory the unemployment rate is lower over the year with a substantial fall in the Northern Territory. The employment participation rate also varies significantly across the states. As you can see from the above chart, employment participation is trending lower across most states and below its recent peak in each state. The state and territories with the highest participation rate are: Northern Territory 76.2% , Australian Capital Territory 70.9% , Western Australia 68.2% and Queensland 66.4% . Across the remaining states, participation is lower, recorded at 63.0% in New South Wales, 64.2% in Victoria, 62.0% in South Australia and 60.9% in Tasmania. Overall the May release showed a level of stability returning to the unemployment rate. Keep in mind the Federal Budget forecasts indicate the unemployment rate to peak at 6.5% however, it is important to note that previous Government forecasts expected the unemployment rate to be at 6.2% currently. With an ageing population we are likely to see the employment participation rate trend lower which will increase pressure on business to improve productivity. On a state-by-state basis the employment picture varies and it will important to keep an eye labour market conditions particularly in Victoria and South Australia where the unemployment rate has risen sharply over the past year. Keep in mind upcoming high-profile manufacturing closures within the car industry are yet to really bite and will impact both Victorian and South Australian jobs.

NSW regional centre tops the list for auctions across Australia

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 15 June, 2014 There are 2,216 auctions scheduled across Australia this week with 1,787 expected in capital cities. The highest volume of auctions in one place this week is in the NSW regional town of Dubbo with 23 auctions planned before the weekend. Auction volumes have dropped from last week, however, in a sign of consistency they are still following the trend compared to last year. There are 8 per cent more auctions scheduled than the same time last year. It is important to note that volumes last week were boosted by the impact of Queen’s Birthday the previous weekend. In Melbourne there are 834 auctions scheduled compared to 1,016 last week. Last week’s clearance rate was the strongest in the past three months and was a very positive sign for the market and it will motivate vendors considering selling in spring. In Sydney there are 688 auctions expected compared to 798 last week. Last weekends clearance rate of 69.3 per cent was well down on the year to date result of 75 per cent and suggests improving conditions for buyers over winter in the auction market. Brisbane has 123 expected auctions following 132 last week. Adelaide has 65 expected auctions compared to 74 last week. Canberra has 33 scheduled auctions compared to the 41 last week. Perth has 36 auctions compared to 32 last week There are 13 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions are expected in Dubbo with 23 scheduled, most of which are for residential development blocks. In capital cities the highest volume are in Richmond VIC with 19 expected. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 22 June, 2014

There are 834 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 820 for the same time last year. Last week was the eleventh time this year that there were more than 1,000 auctions in a week. The latest data shows the use of auctions as a sales method is consistent with last year. In the first three months of this year 30.6 per cent of sales were by auction. This is consistent with last year but is expected to rise as data for April and May is compiled following the settlement of sales. There was a rise of 7.9 per cent in new residential listings in Victoria over the last month with 9,616 homes being newly listed for sale. The average time on market for houses sold at private sale remained stable and tight at 35 days. Vendor discounting improved slightly over the week, at -5.5 per cent, compared to -5.6 per cent over the previous week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 15 June: 69.2 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 22 June: 834 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 15 June: 35 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 15 June: -5.5 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 2.4 per cent higher in month ending 8 June seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne suburbs where homes rarely come up for sale

Folklore says that people buy and sell every seven or so years. However, the truth does seem to be longer with the average hold period for all the homes sold in Melbourne in the year ending 31 March being 11.4 years, and 9.5 years for units. What’s even more interesting are the suburbs whose owners seem to rarely sell; they cover a range of prices and locations in Melbourne. Topping the list with the suburb for the longest period of ownership are the home owners of Vermont South. In Vermont South the average hold period is 18.3 years. If you really like the area and don’t want to wait that long, the average hold period in the more affordable Vermont is only 13.8 years. The top 10 list also has three suburbs with million dollar house values, Ormond where the average hold period is 16.9 years, Caulfield North at 15.4 years and Parkville at 15.4 years. At the more affordable end of the market is Tullamarine. Owners of houses there sell on average every 15.7 years. The fact that the houses in Tullamarine are as tightly held as Ormond but under half the value suggests owners reasons for selling infrequently is not strongly related to their cost. Rather, there will be a range of other demographic reasons why people sell infrequently, which includes what stage of life they were at when they purchased, along with the actual age of the suburb. One interesting and common factor is that each of the suburbs in the top 10 has a lower than average proportion of investors as owners. Vermont South for instance has less than 1 in 10 homes owned by an investor. In Wheelers Hill, which has an average hold period of 16.2 years, only 10.6 per cent of homes are owned by investors. This factor alone does not explain the long periods of ownership in Tullarmarine in which investors own 16.2 per cent of houses. It is likely to be a special case due to its proximity to the major economic activity centre and employment generator, the airport. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

an overview of RP Dataâ

RP Data has just released its quarterly Pain & Gain Report for the March 2014 quarter. Over the first quarter of the year, 9.8% of properties nationally sold for less than their previous purchase price meaning 90.2% of properties sold at or above their previous purchase price. This analysis doesn’t include expenses such as holding costs and purchase and selling costs so the proportion of actual loss-making re-sales would be higher than this reported figure on a net basis. The figures also showed that there was a big discrepancy between the proportion of loss-making re-sales across the capital cities and regional markets. The data showed that loss-making re-sales are much more prevalent in regional areas than across capital cities. This is reflective of the fact that although values are higher over the year in all capital cities, it is not the case across many regional areas. Over the 3 months to March 2014, 6.5% of properties across the capital cities re-sold for less than their previous purchase price compared to 16.0% of re-sales in regional areas. The above chart shows the long-term proportion of loss-making re-sales across both the capital cities and regional markets. Outside of a recent period between the middle of 2004 and early 2009, capital city markets have consistently recorded a lower proportion of loss-making re-sales than regional areas. Recently the differential between capital city and regional markets has been significant which is reflective of the ongoing weaker capital growth conditions within major regional housing markets. Across the major capital city markets the proportion of loss-making re-sales is generally trending lower from a recent peak. This is reflective of the low interest rate environment and the rising home values which results in fewer vendors selling their home for less than what they purchased it for. With mortgage rates touted to remain at low levels for some time we would anticipate that the proportion of loss-making re-sales will continue to trend lower across most capital cities. While we are seeing general improvement in capital cities, regional markets are experiencing a wide variety of performances. Markets that are coastal and linked to the lifestyle segment of the market are seeing a high proportion of loss-making re-sales however, the proportion is now generally trending lower. On the other hand, markets linked to the resources sector, some of which are coastal, are now seeing a much higher proportion on loss-making sales. As many resource projects shift from construction to production demand for workers is much lower which in-turn impacts on the residential housing market, significantly in some instances. Across some of the major lifestyle markets depicted in the chart above you can see that the proportion of loss-making re-sales remains high but is now clearly trending lower. In the Bunbury region of Western Australia, the proportion of loss-making re-sales peaked over the three months May 2012 at 22.3% and have since trended lower and over the most recent quarter were recorded at 16.5% of total sales. In Cairns the recent peak saw 42.6% of re-sales at a loss over the three months to June 2012 and the proportion has since fallen to 28.2%. Loss-making resales on the Gold Coast peaked at 38.6% of all sales over the three months to December 2012 and have since fallen to 25.6% of all sales. Within the Richmond-Tweed region 22.3% of re-sales were at a loss over the March 2014 quarter, down from a peak of 28.9% over the three months to October 2012. On the Sunshine Coast loss-making re-sales peaked at 36.0% of re-sales in October 2012 and have fallen to their current 23.2%. While the proportion of loss-making re-sales is trending lower in coastal markets we’re seeing a rise in other markets, particularly those linked to the resources sector. Over the first quarter of 2014, 16.3% of re-sales were at a loss in the Fitzroy region of Queensland up from 10.0% a year ago. In the Mackay region, 23.3% of re-sales over the first quarter of 2014 were at a loss compared to 14.4% a year earlier. In the Outback region of Western Australia which includes many resource areas loss-making re-sales have risen from 12.0% of sales in the first quarter of 2013 to 17.3% in the first quarter of 2014. There are some clear trends emerging with regard to loss-making re-sales. As home values and sales activity rise across the capital cities the proportion of loss-making re-sales is trending lower as you’d expect . Certainly the capital city markets are experiencing far fewer loss-making sales than regional markets. In many coastal lifestyle markets we are starting to see some low-levels of value growth returning and sales volumes lifting. As a result, loss-making re-sales are still relatively high but are beginning to trend lower. In those areas linked to the resources sector we are seeing the proportion of loss-making re-sales trend higher. This is occurring on the back of many mining projects shifting from construction to production phase. In these areas we are generally seeing falling home values, sales volumes and rental rates while discounting levels and time on market increase. With mortgage rates set to remain low over the coming months we would anticipate that these broad trends will continue. Look for the capital cities and lifestyle markets to see continuing falls in loss-making re-sales whilst markets linked to the resources sector to experience tougher conditions with losses becoming more prevalent.

Demand in Melbourne auction market rises

RP Data National Auction Comment, week ending 15 June, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 66.6 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 60.6 per cent last week and 63.3 per cent this time last year. Sydney has returned a result consistent with its performance over the year and Melbourne has seen a strong week with another 1,000 plus weekend and a clearance rate above trend. In the Sydney market a preliminary clearance rate of 71.7 per cent was recorded compared to 67.3 per cent last week. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 69.6 per cent recorded compared to 62.4 per cent last week. The traditional winter slowdown is more akin to the spring market in some recent years. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 44.7 per cent was recorded compared to 37.3 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 50 per cent compared to 59.4 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 42.9 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 25 per cent. In Tasmania 3 homes sold from 14 auctions. For additional information, contact media@rpdata.com or RP Data auction market commentator – robert.larocca@rpdata.com Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Capital city auction volumes rise 9 per cent on same time 2013

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 15 June, 2014 There are 2,345 auctions scheduled across Australia this week with 1,936 expected in capital cities. Auctions will occur in 1,096 separate suburbs. The 9 per cent increase in auction volumes compared to this time last year is driven mainly by the Sydney market where there has been a substantial shift in selling methods for residential property. This increase is indicative of a preference by real estate agents and vendors to capitalise on the increased competition present in the market. In Melbourne there are 922 auctions scheduled compared to 335 last week. In the first three months of this year 30.6 per cent of sales were by auction. This is consistent with last year but is expected to rise as data for April and May is compiled once sales are settled. In Sydney there are 744 auctions expected compared to 577 last week. The substantial shift to the use of auctions for sales is revealed by new data showing that in the first three months of this year an unprecedented 25.5 per cent of all sales were by auction compared to 13.9 per cent last year. Brisbane has 117 expected auctions following 95 last week. Adelaide has 69 expected auctions compared to 78 last week. Canberra has 39 scheduled auctions similar to the 44 last week. Perth has 29 auctions, higher than last week’s 38. There are 15 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest number of auctions are expected in Richmond VIC which has 18 scheduled. There are also 14 in Doncaster East VIC and Mosman NSW . Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Forget affordability measures and ask yourself some tough questions

There are many measures of affordability in the marketplace, sadly I believe that many of these measures fail to accurately depict the affordability or otherwise of housing in Australia. The main reason being that housing affordability is an extremely complex issue and many factors drive the affordability of housing. In this blog post I am going to investigate some of these factors and tell you what you should really be asking yourself about affordability when purchasing a home. Can I start by stating that simplistic means of comparing property prices between countries I believe are ineffective. Due to different tax regimes, standards of housing and attitudes to property and wealth accumulation there may be perfectly good reasons why a household is prepared to spend more on housing in Australia for example than they are in the United States. I think common measures such as the median multiple ratio of household income to property prices are not necessarily a good way to measure affordability or otherwise, there are a lot more factors at play. Interest rates Interest rates are obviously an important component in determining housing affordability. When interest rates are lower, interest repayments on home loans are lower and as a result ‘affording’ the repayments on a mortgage should be easier. Of course, as we are seeing at the moment, lower mortgage rates often encourage higher property values. So while it’s true that lower interest rates make housing relatively more affordable, if values are rising and sales increase then it can somewhat off-set the affordability benefit of lower mortgage rates. Furthermore, the typical home loan in Australia is 25 years and the vast majority of home loans are on a variable rate. As a result, as the Reserve Bank adjusts monetary policy there is virtually an instant effect on household budgets and balance sheets. For example, at the moment the standard variable mortgage rate sits at 5.95% however, over the past 10 years the variable mortgage rate has averaged 7.27%, over the last 20 years it has averaged 7.45% and over the past 25 years the typical home loan length it has averaged 8.47%. Over the past 25 years, standard variable mortgage rates have been as high as 17.0% and as low as 5.75%. The point is that interest rates can vary greatly over 25 years and over the life of the loan the current interest rate is not a great means of measuring the cost of a mortgage over its lifetime. Wages / Income If you are going to take out a mortgage on a home as most purchasers do you are going to need an income and you are going to need some savings. In Australia there are a number of measures of wages/income and it is difficult to know exactly which one is best to use to measure housing affordability. The National Accounts measure the ‘Real net national disposable income – chain volume’. This measure does have a number of shortcomings in that it is not an individual measure and that it includes items that one can’t really spend such as superannuation. Additionally this data is only available from a national standpoint. The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS publishes its wage price index each quarter however, it measures wages only and doesn’t measure income captured from other sources. The Census is undertaken each 5 years and does report on the median weekly household income however, the shortcoming here is that it is only updated every five years. We also have the Household Income Survey from the ABS however it is only undertaken bi-annually and takes a fairly macro view of household incomes Unfortunately all of these measures have significant shortcomings which need to be considered when looking at any housing affordability measure. Labour force / unemployment Paying off a mortgage eats up a significant portion of a family’s wage. Undoubtedly if home values weren’t so high and mortgages weren’t so large disposable incomes would be much greater. Although labour force data or unemployment statistics need not necessarily be an input into any housing affordability measure they are a key consideration for someone looking to purchase. The threat of unemployment means that despite the fact housing may seem affordable it is less likely someone would purchase. Obviously if you are unemployed it is going to be difficult to purchase a home. Another factor to consider is although measures of income show that over recent years wages and disposable income have increased, what they don’t take into account is how many more women are working nowadays. Labour force data shows that in May 2014, 54.1% of the workforce was male and 45.9% was female, 30 years ago 62.3% was male and 37.6% was female. Today, 35.5% of full-time workers are female compared to 28.9% 30 years ago. The point here is that although household incomes have increased, a big proportion of the increase is due to the structural change associated with a greater number of women in the workforce. The rising prevalence of dual income households means that whereas 20 to 30 years ago couples could afford mortgage repayments on a single wage, today they largely require dual incomes. Home values / prices Most measures of housing affordability look at median prices or median values. The important thing to remember here is that a median is just the middle value so there are just as many homes worth more and less than that figure. In fact the median price looks only at the middle value of properties which have sold over a period. This obviously has significant shortcomings because what is predominately selling could be at the affordable or expensive end of the market and this could bias the median one way or another. Remember that typically only 5% to 7% of total housing stock transacts in a given year. Another important consideration here is that a national median measure doesn’t really tell you very much at a localised level. In Australia, 66% of residents live in a capital city with around 55% in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane or Perth. Quite simply many residents don’t have a choice but to live in a capital city so if you are trying to determine affordability in Melbourne, the cost of housing in Mildura is of no valuable comparison whatsoever. Rental rates If you don’t own a home or pay-off a mortgage you have to live elsewhere, for the most part non-homeowners rent. The cost of renting is an important consideration when trying to determine housing affordability. If rents are increasing but home values are flat or falling purchasing a home may start to look a more attractive prospect. Once again the challenge with a measure which compares rents to house price or mortgage repayments is that it is not a localised analysis. For example for the cost of renting in Paddington in Sydney you may actually be able to pay off a mortgage in Guildford but to the renter is the opportunity cost of owning their own home and being further away from the city centre, harbour and the beaches worthwhile? Who knows but for anyone looking to purchase these are the sorts of questions they need to be asking themselves. The other key consideration is that the ongoing costs associated with owning a home as opposed to renting are difficult to determine, but they are much more than renting. As a renter, the ongoing costs generally include: the rent, the bond, electricity, gas if applicable , cleaning if you move rentals and the cost of moving if/when you move. As an owner of a home the costs incurred include: the mortgage, electricity, gas, council rates, stamp duty when you purchase, ongoing maintenance of the property, strata fees if you own a unit and agent fees if/when you decide to move. The ongoing costs associated with owning a home are much greater than the ongoing costs of renting. Who does housing affordability affect most? Housing affordability affects everyone. The high cost of housing acts as a disincentive for people to move to more appropriate locations, discourages people from upsizing and downsizing and discourages movement intra or interstate for employment. The group most affected by housing affordability however is those who don’t as yet own a home. Again if we think about many of the measures of affordability used they look at typical or median prices values and compare to interest rates and typical wages. The problem with this approach is that very few people are actually typical. As a generalisation, most people that rent are younger, starting out their careers. There is a high likelihood that their wage is currently lower than the median although there is a good chance it will increase as they are promoted or move jobs . If their wage is below the typical wage then they should not be looking to buy the typical or median house . Of course there are plenty of renters that earn above average wages but choose not to purchase as well but when trying to tackle the affordability question I think many of the measures that we look at are far too simplistic, but hamstrung by the quality and granularity of income data. Housing affordability is an individual thing and none of the measures really tell the true story about how affordable or unaffordable housing in Australia is. When determining whether you can afford to buy a home I think the most important things to consider are: What are current mortgage rates and at what higher level would I not be able to repay my mortgage? How secure is my job and what would happen if I was to lose my job for an extended period? Over the next few years what is the realistic expectations for my wage, will it rise and by how much? What impact would it have if I found a partner or lost a partner on my ability to repay the mortgage? If I plan to have children, children cost a lot what impact would that have on my ability to repay the mortgage? Compared to my current rent and associated costs, how much more is paying off a mortgage and the other day-to day costs of home ownership really going to be and can I afford this? What am I willing to sacrifice in order to buy a home; lifestyle, location, overseas travel etc? What is the opportunity cost of buying a home? I am sure there are many more questions to ask when looking to purchase but I think as a start these questions are essential. I say that the measures of affordability which are readily available should be taken with a grain of sale. It’s more important to ask yourself some tough questions about whether or not you can really afford to be a home owner. If you have any doubt you really need to consider whether it is worth the risk or not. For what it’s worth I think that housing affordability is a significant issue for young Australian’s particularly those within our capital city markets. The major problem is that most Australian’s choose to build wealth through property and 23 years of unabated economic growth has on exacerbated this. The challenge now is how can you deliver affordable housing for younger Australian’s without bringing down the cost of existing housing which politically and economically would be detrimental to the overall health of the Australian economy.

RP Data Auction Market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 15 June

There are 922 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 868 for the same time last year. Auction volumes remain high despite the season. Based on settled sales in the first quarter of this year, the suburbs with the highest number of house sales were mainly in the growth areas, suburbs with a high supply of new homes, such as Pakenham with 185 sales, Berwick with 139 sales and Frankston with 134 sales. Whilst not a growth suburb, Glen Waverley was fourth at 117; largely the result of it being a large suburb. We also saw a contraction in the average time on market for houses sold at private sale from 39 to 35 days. This was coupled with a rise in vendor discounting to – 5.6 per cent from -5.5 per cent over the previous week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 8 June: 62.4 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 15 June: 922 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 8 June: 35 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 8 June: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 1.1 per cent higher in month ending 8 June seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Investor activity high in growth suburbs of Melbourne

Research by RP Data comparing the level of property ownership between owner occupiers and investors at a suburb level in Melbourne reveals some clear and interesting trends. The results show that ownership for investment purposes in the Melbourne detached housing market is strongest in the growth suburbs. In many of the cities growing outer suburbs investor ownership accounts for more than 3 in every 10 properties. When ranked by level of ownership by investors, the top three suburbs are Point Cook which has 41.9 per cent of all houses owned by investors, followed by Tarneit with 40.9 per cent and Truganina at 39.8 per cent. In each case, median rents are below the Melbourne average of $444 per week and yields are in excess of the metropolitan average of 3.3 per cent. In Point Cook the median advertised rent is $380 per week and the indicative gross yield is 4.3 per cent. In Tarneit the weekly rent is $315, the yield is 4.4 per cent and in Truganina the rent is $320 per week and the yield is 4.7 per cent. Clearly investors in these areas are motivated by the yield. Only time will tell how these suburbs will fare from a capital gains perspective as they are still experiencing a high rate supply with many new properties being built and sold. Coupled with this is the short length of ownership making it difficult to draw strong conclusions on capital gains into the future. At the other end of the spectrum are the areas with the lowest proportion of investor ownership and highest level of owner occupiers. RP Data’s research shows that less than 1 in 20 houses in the suburbs of Narre Warren North, Wonga Park, Launching Place, Park Orchards and Montrose are owned by investors. Like many other suburbs with a very low level of investor activity, these places tend to be in the outer eastern or north eastern suburbs. In the unit segment of the market, the suburbs with the highest levels of investor ownership are often those with significant and large developments with suburbs such as Travencore, Kingsville, Carlton, Elwood, Notting Hill, Hawthorn and Melbourne topping the list. Each of these areas has more than 7 in 10 units owned by an investor. If you are looking at this data with a view to investing in residential property it is important to appreciate that just because investor concentration is high in these areas it does not mean these are the areas likely to deliver the best return on an investment. When making investment decisions, great care and attention to detail such as using the correct research is imperative. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Low auction volumes across capital cities

RP Data National Auction Comment; Week ending 8 June, 2014 A preliminary weighted average clearance rate of 59.9 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 66.4 per cent last week and 61.4 per cent this time last year. This is well below the year’s high of 76.2 per cent recorded in late February, however comparatively low volumes this week reduce its value as an indicator to the state of the market. In the Sydney market a preliminary clearance rate of 65.7 per cent was recorded compared to 73 per cent last week. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 61 per cent recorded compared to 65.4 per cent last week. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 42.9 per cent was recorded compared to 42.5 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 63 per cent compared to 55.3 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 50 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 33.3 per cent. In Tasmania 4 homes sold from 17 auctions. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Housing finance data for April 2014

Housing finance data for April 2014 was released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS . The headline figure for the number of owner occupier housing finance commitments was flat over the month however, dig a little deeper and there are some differing trends emerging. As mentioned, the number of owner occupier housing finance commitments was flat over the month following on from a -0.8% fall in March. This data is split into commitments for refinance purposes and commitments for non-refinances or new loans . Refinance commitments rose by 0.6% compared to a -0.3% fall in non-refinance commitments. Non-refinance commitments fell over consecutive months and it was the first time this has happened since December 2012. Given the number is a count it is important to look at the trend and it is clear from the first chart that the number of owner occupier commitments, whether it be for non-refinances or refinances is beginning to flatten. Year-on-year, refinance commitments are 8.6% higher compared to a 5.7% rise in non-refinance commitments. The number of owner occupier housing finance commitments for the construction of new dwellings and the purchase of new dwellings have shown a strong rise recently however, as the above chart shows there has been some recent weakness in commitments for the purchase of new dwellings The number of commitments for construction of new is almost three times greater than the number for purchase of new nevertheless, the recent weakness is certainly something to keep track of. The data on the number of commitments is important however it is narrow in its scope given it does not include investors. From a banking perspective, the value of the funds they are lending is arguably more important than the number of loans written. The total value of housing finance commitments which includes investor commitments increased by 1.7% in April and increased by the same amount if you remove refinance commitments. Over the month, owner occupier refinance commitments were 1.6% higher, owner occupier non-refinance commitments were 1.3% higher and investment loan commitments increased by 2.3%. As the above chart shows, investment and owner occupier lending is at record high levels whereas non-refinance loan commitments are still -5.7% lower than their previous peak. In terms of the value of finance commitments all three segments continue to record a rise and are trending higher. Year-on-year the total value of housing finance commitments are 20.4% higher with owner occupier refinances up 19.1%, owner occupier non-refinances up 13.4% and investment loans 29.8% higher. It’s also important to look at the make-up of lending across owner occupiers and investment loans. Over the month of April, 43.0% of all lending was to owner occupiers for non-refinances, 39.4% was to investors and 17.6% was to owner occupiers for refinances. As the above chart shows the proportion of lending to investors is high on an historical basis. In fact investment lending is sitting at levels not seen since late 2003. It is clear from the data that there is significant demand for housing from investment currently. The big question of course is how sustainable is that demand given there was a sharp slowdown in this segment of the market shortly thereafter lending last reached similar heights. It is interesting to pair this data with recently released quarterly data from the Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority APRA about Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions’ ADIs exposure to property. The latest data showed that interest-only loans accounted for 39.4% of all loans over the quarter a similar proportion to these investor figures . However, the data also suggested that loans with a loan to value ratio LVR of more than 90% may be getting harder to find with 13.5% of new loans over the quarter with an LVR of more than 90% which was the lowest proportion since September 2011. Focussing on lending to first home buyers, there were 6,074 housing finance commitments to first home buyers in April 2014. This figure was -7.3% lower over the month and -12.7% lower year-on-year. As a proportion of all owner occupier housing finance commitments, first home buyers accounted for an equal record low of just 12.3% of the commitments over the month. The RP Data Mortgage Index RMI which is an index of mortgage events across RP Data’s proprietary platforms has a strong correlation with housing finance data and is a weekly index. The RMI predicted a softening of activity some six weeks ago and is indicating a sharp rebound in the housing finance data once the May data is released. Note that the RMI data is correlated strongly to the raw housing finance data not the seasonally adjusted figures which are referred to elsewhere throughout this post. The data seems to suggest that the growth in the number of new owner occupier housing finance commitments is starting to or has topped out. There is still plenty of activity in the owner occupier refinance and investment segments of the market. Of course our chief concern remains the high level of investment activity in the market. Total returns from residential property have been strong over the past 12 to 18 months however, we believe that the peak level of capital growth has now passed and rental yields continue to fall. Although total returns are still strong they are likely to diminish from here and where will that leave these investors especially if they were simply chasing the short-term value appreciation which has been particularly prevalent in Sydney and Melbourne over the past year. The good news is that the higher risk, high LVR loans are reducing however, there are still a lot of instances in which mortgagees are only paying back the interest component of the mortgage.

Auction market takes a breather for the long weekend

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 8 June, 2014 There are 1,425 auctions scheduled across Australia this week with 1,073 expected in capital cities. Volumes remain higher than this time last year and are 38% higher, however, these are lower than last week due to the long weekend in most parts of the Australia. After the record number of auctions in the first five months of the year, Sydney continues as the strongest auction market. In Sydney there are 532 auctions expected compared to 1,316 last week. Sydney’s year to date clearance rate is 75.6 per cent from 15,187 auctions, well up on the 68 per cent from 9,260 this time last year. In Melbourne there are 303 auctions scheduled compared to 1,356 last week. Melbourne has a year to date clearance rate of 67.5 per cent and the market has cooled after the high of 76.6 per cent in early March. Brisbane has 84 expected auctions following 219 last week. Adelaide has 70 expected auctions compared to 87 last week. Canberra has 41 scheduled auctions similar to the 48 last week. Perth has 33 auctions, higher than last week’s 30. There are 24 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia the highest volume of auctions will be found in Auburn NSW and Blacktown NSW , both of which have 10 scheduled. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Has the housing market moved through the peak of the growth cycle?

The RP-Data Rismark Home Value Index reported its first month on month fall in May after capital city dwelling values consistently rose over the previous eleven months. The extent to which the May decline was a seasonal factor has been a key topic across the media; generally the month of May is a seasonally weak time for housing markets and no doubt the most recent result suggests that was the case again this year. When we adjust our index for seasonality the May numbers are still down 1.2% compared with a 1.9% fall in the original index reading. When we take the adjusted reading and also look at trend rate of growth over a rolling three month period it becomes increasingly evident that the Australian housing market has probably moved through the peak of its growth phase. In fact, the quarterly rate of growth peaked back in June of last year at 1.9% in original terms and has since trended progressively lower. A few other factors are lining up to suggest the housing market may be cooling. Consumer sentiment, which shows a high correlation with housing demand, peaked in September last year. After the index tumbled in May as consumers reacted pessimistically to the May budget announced the consumer sentiment reading is down 16 percent from the recent peak reading. Historically buyer demand tends to move with consumer confidence readings; when consumers are confident they are generally much more willing to make a high commitment decision such as purchasing a property. We have also seen some softening in our vendor metrics. Auction clearance rates peaked in February this year at 76% and last week were recorded at a still healthy but lower 66%. Vendor discounting eased ever so slightly in April, rising from 5.4% to 5.6% in April. And the average selling time showed a modest increase, rising from 36 days to sell the typical capital city property to 37 days which is still a historically low reading . Another factor that is likely to be dampening housing market conditions is affordability and the ratio of rental prices to dwelling prices. Value growth has substantially outpaced rental growth which means purchasing a home is becoming substantially more expensive than renting. Over the past five years Sydney dwelling values have increased by 32.5% while rents are up 25.7%. Similarly, in Melbourne values are up 26.9% over the past five years while rents are up a much lower 16.2%. Both cities have seen investment yields move substantially lower to be the lowest of any capital city. While value growth in the housing market may be moderating across combined capital cities, it’s important to remember that each city and region is at a different stage of the growth cycle. While Melbourne, Sydney and Perth appear to have moved through the peak of their cycle, momentum seems to have gathered some pace in those markets where growth conditions have previously been more sedate than the larger cities. Brisbane, where transaction numbers are more than 20% higher over the March quarter compared with the same period a year prior, has seen a pick-up in the rolling quarterly pace of growth while Adelaide and Hobart have also showed some evidence improving market conditions. Historically these capital cities have lagged behind Sydney and Melbourne in market growth phases. We don’t believe that the falls recorded in May are set to continue however, a slower rate of growth over the coming months is likely. The real test for the market will be throughout the spring selling season where sales and listings ramp up once again. Given the housing market began this year with momentum it seems unlikely that value growth will return to the highs recorded over the second half of 2013.

RP Data market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 8 June, 2014

There are 303 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 197 for the same time last year. Volumes are temporarily low due to the long weekend. So far this year there have been 16,357 auctions and a clearance rate of 67.5 per cent compared to 68.6 per cent from 12,341 auctions this time last year. The high volume of residential listings this year is having a positive impact for buyers. Home values have fallen for the second month in a row and auction clearance rates have remained in the 60’s. The RP Data-Rismark May Home Value Index released this week showed that the value of a house dropped by 3.6 per cent in the month resulting in a rise of only 1.6 per cent over 2014. Unit values fell by 2.6 per cent over the year following a drop of 3.4 per cent in the month. It’s unlikely that buyers over winter and into spring will see their purchasing power diminished. We also saw a small fall in the average time on market for houses sold at private sale from 41 to 39 days. This was coupled with a rise in vendor discounting to – 5.5 per cent from -5.4 per cent over the previous week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 1 June: 65.4 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 8 June: 303 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 1 June: 39 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 1 June: -5.5 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 1.1 per cent higher in month ending 1 June seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne house and unit values fall for two consecutive months

The key differences between the past two property cycles and the current one has become much clearer following Monday’s release of the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Indices results for May. The May results showed that the value of a house dropped by 3.6 per cent in May resulting in a rise of only 1.6 per cent over 2014. Unit values also fell by 2.6 per cent over the year following; a drop of 3.4 per cent in the month. After a new nominal peak in Melbourne house values was reached in March, there has been two consecutive months in which values have fallen ensuring buyers in winter and early spring won’t face rapid price rises. In fact, they are likely to see houses valued lower than they were in real terms in 2010. This result should also eliminate any concerns that the local market was locked into a cycle of unstainable growth in prices. This upswing phase in house values started in May two years ago and is clearly more moderate than the 2007 and 2010 cycles due to better alignment between supply and population growth along with the fact that consumers remain cautious. Over the past two years, house values in Melbourne have risen by 13.1 per cent and are now only 0.7 per cent higher than the October 2010 peak. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

RP Data National Auction Comment; Week ending 1 June, 2014

Sydney leads a strong week for the auction sales across capital cities A preliminary auction clearance rate* of 68.3 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 67.1 per cent last week and 72.1 per cent this time last year. Auction volumes reached record levels across the nation in May. This week’s clearance is lower than this time last year however there were 3,037 auctions held compared to only 1,845 in capital cities this time last year. The higher volumes are partly the result of an increased use of auctions to take advantage of improved demand from buyers. In the Sydney market a preliminary clearance rate of 77.1 per cent recorded compared to 73.1 per cent last week. In Melbourne there was a preliminary clearance rate of 64.6 per cent recorded compared to 66.6 per cent last week. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 48.8 per cent was recorded compared to 49.4 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 59.3 per cent compared to 64.2 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 64 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 58.8 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

New listings much higher than a year ago while total listings have recently risen and are now are at a similar level as a year ago

RP Data tracks the number of unique residential properties listed for sale each week across the nation, individual states, individual capital cities and combined capital cities. The data is captured for residential houses and units as well as vacant residential land. The count of listings is undertaken on a rolling 28 day basis and separates the data by new property listings those not seen for six months , re-listed properties those seen within the last six months and total listings new and re-listings . Over the 28 days to 25 May 2014, there were 248,905 unique properties listed for sale across the country. Of this 248,905, 44,848 were new listings over the previous 4 weeks with the remaining 204,057 being re-listed properties. The number of new listings was at its highest level since the week ending 13 April 2014 with new listings having trended higher over the past four weeks. Re-listed properties were at their highest level since the four weeks ending 12 January 2014. Re-listings have also trended higher over the past four weeks. As a result, total property listings are at their highest level since the four weeks ending 16 March 2014. Compared to the same time a year ago, the number of newly advertised properties are much higher +12.4% while total listings were virtually unchanged. Looking at the new stock which has been listed for sale over the past four weeks, 31,925 new listings were for houses, 10,232 new units were listed and 2,691 new vacant land listings entered the market. Over the past four weeks, 71.2% of new listings were for houses, 22.8% were units and 6.0% were for vacant land. Re-listed stock also shows a high proportion of houses compared to units and vacant land. Over the most recent four weeks there were 134,461 re-listed houses 65.9% , 37,679 re-listed units 18.5% and 31,917 re-listed vacant land lots 15.6% . On a state-by-state basis we can see some significant variations in listing performance. The number of new property listings is higher than a year ago in each state except for Queensland -1.3% and the Australian Capital Territory -14.7% . Total listings are higher than a year ago in New South Wales, Western Australia, Tasmania and the Northern Territory but lower elsewhere. New South Wales and Victoria are the most populous states however, Queensland has the highest number of property listings with 4,693 more properties for sale than across New South Wales. Looking at the combined capital city market, there were 28,085 new properties listed for sale over the four weeks to 25 May and new listings were 17.5% higher than a year ago. Capital city new property listings accounted for 62.6% of all new listings nationally. Over the same period, there were 104,705 total capital city property listings which was -4.1% lower than the previous year. Total capital city property listings accounted for just 42.1% of all listings nationally. This reflects the much tighter supply of stock available for sale across capital city markets compared to regional areas of the country and at least partially explains why generally home values are rising at a faster pace in capital cities than in regional marketplaces. Throughout the individual capital cities new property listings are generally higher than a year ago with Canberra the only exception. Sydney in particular is seeing a significant rise in new listings which are 37.5% higher than they were a year ago. Although the amount of new stock coming to the market is generally higher than a year ago, total stock levels are generally lower with Perth, Hobart and Darwin the exceptions. The fact that new listings are much higher than last year but total listings are generally lower indicates a greater level of absorption and the fact that properties are selling quicker than they were a year ago. Although total listings in Melbourne are -7.0% lower than they were a year ago, it is quite interesting to note that Melbourne currently has 31,867 properties for sale compared to 22,124 in Sydney, a difference of 9,743 properties. As we head into a seasonally quieter period for housing market activity it will be interesting to see whether new and total listings continue to rise. In recent weeks we have noted that auction clearance rates have trended lower despite the fact that volumes remain high, particularly high for this time of year. We would expect new listing activity will slow over the coming months and ramp back up in spring. It will be interesting to watch because sales volumes are still trending higher as are housing finance commitments and if new listings fall we may see even greater demand for the available stock in certain markets throughout the coming months.

Sydney & Melbourne auction markets break records in pre Queen’s Birthday auctions

RP Data National Auction Preview, week ending 1 June, 2014 There are 3,439 auctions scheduled across Australia this week with 2,855 expected in capital cities. There are 1,010 more auctions in capital cities than was the case on the same weekend a year ago but only 69 more than last weekend. The high volume this week is a result of a generally buoyant market, a reduction in auctions next week due to the Queen’s Birthday holiday and a shift towards auctions in Sydney and Melbourne. The Sydney and Melbourne markets are both setting records for the number of auctions in the first five months of the year. In Melbourne there are 1,264 auctions scheduled compared to 1,211 last week. With a clearance rate remaining in the mid 60’s buyers continue to be well placed. In Sydney there are 1,223 auctions expected in what is the record run of 7 weeks over 1,000 this year. So far this year there has been a record 13,871 auctions, 60.9 per cent more than the same time last year. In Canberra 45 auctions are scheduled, well down on last weeks 76. Perth has 27 auctions, also well down on last weeks 70. After Sydney and Melbourne the largest volume of auctions are in Queensland outside of Brisbane with 261 scheduled. There are 192 in Brisbane. In Adelaide 83 auctions are expected compared to 121 last week. There are 16 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia the highest volume of auctions will be found in Richmond VIC and Randwick NSW , both of which have 24 scheduled Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Taxation revenue from property continues to climb in 2012-13

Earlier this week the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released data which revealed that 46.4% of state and local government taxation revenue over the 2012-13 financial year came from property related taxes. The data showed that over the year, state and local governments collected a record $35.931 billion in taxes from property related sources. In comparison, they collected $20.752 million in taxes from employers, $11,089 million in taxes from the provision of goods and services and $9.638 million in taxes on the use of goods and performance of activities. As this shows, at a state and local government level property taxes are the largest source of revenue. The total value of property related taxes increased by 7.2% over the most recent financial year. In comparison, taxes on employer’s payroll and labour force rose by 5.1%, taxes on the provision of goods and services rose 2.4% and taxes on the use of goods and performance of activities rose 8.6%. With home values nationally beginning to rise in June 2012, it is clear that state and local government are a major benefactor. With higher home values, taxes such as land tax, municipal rates and stamp duty on conveyances all increase. Of the $35.931 billion in property related tax revenue collected in 2012-13, 40% came from municipal rates and 36% came from stamp duties on conveyances. Land tax was the only other sizeable contributor to property related tax accounting for 17% of revenue. Over the year the most significant increase in property related taxes came from stamp duty, up by 16.9%. The amount of tax revenue collected from municipal rates increased by 6.8%, and land taxes increased by 1.5%. Property related tax revenue is only collected by those who own properties. Ultimately every property is owned by someone, some as an owner occupier and some as an investor. The taxes levied against property are typically only payable by the owner of the property. Given this, those who choose to rent rather than own property pay no tax on property. Not to mention the fact that the cost of renting is typically much lower than the cost of owning, it is no surprise more people are choosing to rent rather than own property. State and local governments have clearly experienced a significant revenue boost via the improvement in the residential housing market over the year. Stamp duty in particular has seen a significant rise. With sales volumes and property values rising there have been more sales to receive stamp duty from and at a higher price which also increases the stamp duty collected. Of course, the issue with stamp duty is that it is a tax only collected across those properties which sell. From a residential perspective this is just 5% to 7% of the total housing stock over a given year. Stamp duty also acts as a disincentive for home owners to transact property on a more regular basis because it is a tax paid on a new purchase. Many people have called for the removal of stamp duties which would be a positive move to encourage greater mobility of residents. Of course state and local governments would lose 36% of their property related tax revenue and 17% of their total taxation revenue. Many have called for replacing stamp duty with a blanket land tax, another tax would likely be very unpopular and you’d have to consider how equitable that would be particularly for those who have recently paid stamp duty. To put a blanket land tax into perspective to cover the $12.841 billion in stamp duty revenue over the 2012-13 financial year, each residential dwelling would have to pay $1,391.69 based on the ABS estimate of 9,226,900 residential dwellings as at June 2013. Keep in mind that stamp duty isn’t just payable on residential property transactions. Over the year, stamp duty revenue was higher in each state except for Victoria -1.4% , Queensland -6.7% and the Australian Capital Territory -3.3% . New South Wales 21.4% , Western Australia 33.0% and the Northern Territory 35.5% recorded the greatest rises in stamp duty revenue. According to the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Index, Sydney home values rose by 5.6% over the year, Perth values were 6.0% higher and Darwin values were 6.1% higher. Conversely, Melbourne home values were 3.4% higher, Brisbane values were just 0.6% higher and Canberra value were 1.1% higher. Clearly home value rises have a positive effect on stamp duty revenues. The data highlighted shows that property is the most important source of revenue for state and local governments, accounting for 46.4% of their total taxation revenue. The issue of course is that these levels of government are looking to constantly grow their revenues. The two main sources of property related revenue are rates and stamp duty. Rates can be grown by encouraging a greater number of ratepayers into a region create more housing and stamp duty can only be lifted by changing the rates or encouraging higher prices and/or more sales. In certain regions increasing the supply of ratepayers is not possible so it is clear that stamp duty is an extremely important source of revenue. With the housing market recording significant value growth and much higher sales volumes throughout the 2013-14 financial year no doubt stamp duty revenue will be much higher again. The question is can governments continue to rely on property being a one-way bet? Particularly when the Reserve Bank has repeatedly warned of late that it is not.

RP Data market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 1 June, 2014

There are 1,264 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 867 for the same time last year. The strong level of auction listings in the first 5 months of this year compared to 31.6 per cent higher last year is a reflection of two things; firstly it shows the confidence of vendors where they are willing to sell for a reasonable price, and secondly, a preference by real estate agents for auctions as a method of sale in an improving market. The strong volumes will also mitigate price growth as buyers’ bargaining power is increased. We saw a small rise in the average time on market for houses sold at private sale from 40 to 41 days. Vendor discounting reduced to – 5.4 per cent from -5.5 per cent the previous week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 25 May: 66.6 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 1 June: 1,264 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 25 May: 41 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 25 May: -5.4 per cent houses Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne auction market records

With the first 5 months of 2014 almost complete, it is worth noting that a large number of auction records have been broken in the Melbourne market. Highest volume of auctions ever Taking into account the expected auctions this week there have been around 16,236 auctions already held this year which is 30 per cent more than the previous high in 2010. Most 1,000 plus weeks ever Once the planned auctions scheduled for this week are held, there will have been 10 weeks in the year when the volume has exceeded 1,000. This is more than three times the record of three weeks in 2010. Most consecutive weeks over 1,000 Never before has Melbourne seen two or even three consecutive weeks with over 1,000 auctions before June. Single week record for auctions prior to June Melbourne has broken the 1,294 auction recorded three times this year including the peak of 1,530 in the week ending on 13 April. Most homes sold by auction prior to June Even if there are no homes sold at auction this week, the number sold by auction will have been reached a record high. The previous record of 9,758 from 2010 will probably be exceeded by around 1,000. These records are impressive as they show a healthy market but they don’t mean that it has been just a sellers market. Around one third of homes offered at auction have been passed in as the vendors expectations have not been matched by the market on the day. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

APRA Data highlights rising prominence of interest-only and high LVR lending

APRA today released data on Australian ADIs Authorised Deposit-taking Institution exposure to property earlier today. The data showed that at the end of the March 2014 quarter, there was $1.2 trillion worth of residential loans to households across Australia, up from $1.17 trillion at the end of 2013. Focusing on the total value of lending, 35.4% of the outstanding loans to domestic ADIs have an offset facility and 35.4% are interest only mortgages. The proportions of each are at a record high level currently. On the other hand, only 3.1% of mortgages are low-documentation loans which is at a historic low proportion. Just 0.1% are other non-standard loans. Looking at the number of loans, 29.6% of all loans have an offset facility and 78.0% have a re-draw facility. In terms of the number of loans, 28.0% are interest-only mortgages and 3.5% are low-documentation loans. The proportion of loans with an offset facility and the proportion of interest-only mortgages are at a record high while the proportion of low-documentation loans is at a record low. The average outstanding balance for residential loans was recorded at $235,000 at the end of March 2014, up from $233,500 at the end of 2013. Loans with an offset facility $281,400 and interest-only mortgages $297,200 have a much higher average balance than the average across all loans. Over the first quarter of 2014, there was $73.815 billion in new residential mortgages, down from $84.160 billion over the final quarter of 2013. Of these new loans, 64.3% were to owner occupiers and 35.7% were to investors. As I mentioned previously, the proportion of interest-only loans which were outstanding to banks was recorded at 35.4% based on value however, interest-only lending was much higher over the quarter with 39.4% of new loans interest-only loans. It is clear that low-documentation loans are becoming harder to receive. Over the March 2008 quarter, 11.5% of loans were low-documentation, over the most recent quarter just 0.6% of new loans were low-documentation. Over the quarter, 3.1% of loans were approved outside of serviceability which was steady over the quarter. The proportion of loans approved outside of serviceability has been higher than it is currently but was consistently lower than 3% of all loans before the June 2012 quarter. The level of higher LVR lending also increased over the first quarter of this year with 34.8% of new loans having an LVR of 80% or more, up from 34.2% over the previous quarter. The proportion of new loans with an LVR of more than 80% is at its highest level since the December 2011 quarter 34.9% . Although higher LVR lending is increasing, the proportion of loans written with an LVR of 90% or more was recorded at 13.5%, down from 13.6% the previous quarter. This indicates that there is growth in the 80% to 90% LVR segment, which accounted for 21.3% of new mortgages over the quarter, up from 20.7% the previous quarter. The proportion of new loans with an LVR of between 60% and 80% accounted for the largest proportion of new loans at 41.2% and sitting at its highest proportion since September 2011 41.5% . By combining the latest data from APRA with recently released data from the ABS, you get some really valuable additional insights into the exposure of Australian ADIs to residential property. The ABS estimates that there were 9.334 million residential dwellings in Australia at the end of March 2014 and the latest APRA data highlights that there was 4,999,800 outstanding mortgages at the end of March 2014. This indicates that only 53.6% of all dwellings nationally have a mortgage. Of course as you can see from the chart which follows the proportion of mortgages properties is rising. The ABS estimates that the total value of residential dwellings across Australia was $5.1 trillion at the end of March 2014. Pairing that with the value of outstanding mortgages reported by APRA at the same time $1.2 trillion it indicates that only 23.4% of the value of Australian housing is mortgaged to Australian ADIs. This analysis highlights that for better or worse, Australian’s store significant wealth within their residential properties. Overall the data indicates that the proportion of interest-only lending and loans with an off-set facility is increasing. No doubt APRA will have a close eye on this phenomenon, particularly interest-only lending which is inherently more risky than when both the principal and interest is repaid. The majority of new mortgages are written on an LVR of less than 80% however, the rising proportion being written between 80% and 90% will no doubt be closely scrutinised. It is encouraging to see that there are fewer new mortgages being written with an LVR above 90%. Although the current value of housing compared to that mortgaged is relatively low, a sharp down-turn in property values would have a significant impact on more recent purchasers. The first five years of a mortgage is inherently the riskiest. Whilst those who have owned their home and have significant equity within it can weather a down-turn, recent buyers with little or no equity, and those who have leveraged their equity for other investments are significantly more exposed in the event of a downturn.

RP Data National Auction Comment; Week ending 25 May, 2014

Volumes rise and demand increases across capital city auction markets A preliminary auction clearance rate* of 66.1 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 66.6 per cent last week and 67.1 per cent this time last year. Demand from buyers was clearly sufficient to ensure that the clearance rate was largely unaffected by the substantial 61 per cent rise in homes on offer at auction compared to this time a year ago. In the Sydney market demand strengthened with a preliminary clearance rate of 76.2 per cent recorded compared to 69.9 per cent last week. Buyers have welcomed the increased choice this week. In Melbourne demand and supply continue to be well balanced with a preliminary clearance rate of 61.7 per cent recorded compared to 68.8 per cent last week. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 49.5 per cent was recorded compared to 46.5 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 67.2 per cent compared to 63.8 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 50.9 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was a clearance rate of 45.2 per cent. In Tasmania there was 2 sales from 4 results. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist *Weighted average

RP Data National Auction Preview; Week ending 25 May, 2014

Unprecedented volume of auctions across Australian capital cities this week There are 3,111 auctions scheduled across Australia this week with 2,589 expected in capital cities – a remarkable 53 per cent more than the 1,687 auctions held a year ago. Vendors may be concerned about the high volume of competing auctions but should gain confidence from last week’s results when there was a small increase in the clearance rate to 66.6 per cent across capital cities from 65 per cent in conjunction with increased supply. The increase in volumes this week is largely as a result of an unprecedented surge in listings in Melbourne and Sydney for May, both of which have more than 1,000 auctions. In Melbourne there are 1,137 auctions scheduled in what is the ninth week this year with over 1,000. In Sydney volumes are almost twice last year’s at 598, with 1,017 homes to be offered for sale at auction. Both Canberra and Perth are expecting a record number of auctions so far this year with 72 expected in Canberra and 69 scheduled in Perth. In Adelaide, 119 auctions are expected compared to 121 last week. In Brisbane 175 auctions are expected following last week’s 133. There are 8 auctions scheduled in Tasmania. Across Australia, the highest volume of auctions will be found Melbourne’s expensive eastern suburbs with 24 scheduled for Glen Iris. In Sydney the highest volume of auctions are in the inner city suburb of Paddington with 21 scheduled. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

RP Data market preview, Melbourne; Week ending 25 May, 2014

Melbourne auction volumes remain high as there are 1,137 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne, compared to 823 at the same time last year. This will be the ninth week with more than 1,000 auctions in Melbourne. The highest number of auctions this week is in Glen Iris with 24 followed by Northcote and South Yarra, both with 19. The Melbourne auction market continues to record reasonable clearance rates in light of the very strong volumes. Volumes in the auction market are consistent with those across the residential market which is seeing more new homes being listed and more sold. In Melbourne there are 31,604 homes listed for sale, 8.7 per cent lower than a year ago. At the same time new listings have been consistently higher than a year ago, over the month ending 18 May there was 15.7 per cent more new listings. Key data Clearance rate week ending 18 May: 68.5 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 25 May: 1,137 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 18 May: 40 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 18 May: -5.5 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 1.3 per cent lower over the month ending 18 May seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

A case study of Sydney housing over time

Over the three months to April 1990, the median selling price of a dwelling a combination of houses and units across Sydney was recorded at $152,500. As at April 2014, the median selling price of a dwelling was $680,000 which represents a 347% increase in selling price over the 24 year period. Of course a median price is only measured across properties which actually transacted but it is interesting to look at what the median priced home is over time The following charts will look at the changes in median price over time and the location of median priced sales. Note that the each dot represents one sale and the red dots indicate house sales while the blue dots represent unit sales. The buffers shown on the maps represent a 10 kilometre, 20 kilometre and 50 kilometre distance from the Sydney CBD. 3 months to April 1990 The median price of a Sydney home over the three months to April 1990 was $237,000, across the city there was 12 sales at that price over the period, 3 of which were units and the remaining 9 were houses. Apart from 1 sale at Sylvania, the reaming 11 sales all occurred within a 20 kilometre radius of the city. For houses, you will note that 4 of the 9 suburbs are located within a 10 kilometre radius of the city and for units, Epping was the only suburb with a sale outside of the 10 kilometre region. 3 months to April 1994 Moving to April 1994, there were 34 sales at the median price over the three month period and the median price was recorded at $169,000. Comparing this chart to the previous chart you see that the median priced house is beginning to move further away from the city centre with only 5 of the 24 median priced house sales within 10 kilometres of the city centre and 5 of those 24 sales were located more than 20 kilometres from the city centre. For units, 3 of the 10 sales were outside of a 10 kilometre radius of the city, 2 of which were more than 20 kilometres away. 3 months to April 1999 By April 1999, the Sydney median house price was recorded at $237,000 and over that three month period there was 28 houses sold at that price and 31 units. The big shift over the five year period was the fact that none of the median priced house sales were within a 10 kilometre radius and a greater proportion were located more than 20 kilometres from the city than those within 20 kilometres. Within a 10 kilometre radius of the city, units where the only sales at the median price however, units transacting at the median price were becoming more common in areas more than 10 kilometres from the city centre. 3 months to April 2004 The median Sydney dwelling price over the three months to April 2004 in Sydney was recorded at $440,000. Over the preceding 3 months there were 62 house sales and 65 unit sales at that price. Compared to five years earlier there were a few house sales within 10 kilometres of the city centre however, once again the majority occurred more than 20 kilometres from the city centre. For units, most sales still occurred close to the city centre however, more and more were transacting at the median price further away from the city centre. 3 months to April 2009 By April 2009, the median dwelling price in Sydney was slightly lower than from five years earlier, recorded at $420,000. Keep in mind that from early 2004 to mid-2009 there was no growth in Sydney home values after they fell by around 10%. The map is quite similar to the previous one with 102 houses and 103 units sold at the median price. Once again only a few house sales were within a 10 kilometre radius of the city with the vast majority occurring more than 20 kilometres from the CBD. Unit sales were fairly similar and mostly focused within the 20 kilometre radius of the city. 3 months to April 2014 Over the most recent three month period, the median Sydney dwelling price was recorded at $680,000. Over the three month period and note these figures will be revised higher there was 31 house sales at the median price and 40 unit sales. Looking at the above map again we see few house sales within a 20 kilometre radius of the city and the median priced unit is pushing further away from the city centre with more and more sales occurring more than 10 kilometres from the CBD. The analysis is an interesting exercise in how over time, the ‘typical’ home across the city is moving further and further away from the city centre. As a result, it is no wonder we are seeing growing levels of higher density development in the major capital cities. As the typical housing option moves further away from the city centre, those that need or want to be close to the city centre look for more affordable alternatives such as units. As the city continues to grow and density in the inner city increases we would expect a further drift outwards of both the typical house and unit sale in Sydney.

Days on market drops in Melbourne

The average number of days a house spends on the market has fallen to a new low according to the latest RP Data monthly update. In March a house for sale by private sale in Melbourne spent 35 days on the market. As most auction selling campaigns are around 28 days, it is interesting to note that private sales are delivering, in broad terms, similarly quick sales. This is also significant because the majority, around 69 per cent in 2013, of Melbournians sell by private sale. Comparing March this year with the past few years shows the change clearly, last year the time on market was 45 days, the year before that it was 57 days and in 2010, when the market last peaked, it was 38 days. There is clearly a reflection between the strength of the market and the time it takes to sell a house. Units are taking slightly longer; around 37 days – but this is not a significant difference and they show a similar trend over time. On a suburban level the shortest time on market is generally found in the outer east of the city in The Basin, Croydon South and Knoxfield. Time on market data on a suburban level is calculated over a longer time period so fluctuates to a lessor degree but still clearly shows the areas where sales are more rapid. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

RP Data national auction market comment; Week ending 18 May, 2014

National auction market stable despite a strong rise in the number of properties taken to auction. A preliminary auction clearance rate* of 65.4 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 65.0 per cent last week and 67.3 per cent this time last year. The auction clearance rate has maintained a stable performance despite a 42 per cent rise in the number of properties taken to auction this week and concerns the federal budget may have a negative impact on buyer demand. In the Sydney market a weaker preliminary clearance rate of 70.9 per cent was recorded compared to 73.3 per cent last week highlighting improving conditions for buyers. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 64.5 per cent was recorded compared to 61.9 per cent last week. Auction numbers rose steeply this week and it is significant that the clearance rate didn’t drop below the lows of the last fortnight. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 49.5 per cent was recorded compared to 46.7 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 65.5 per cent compared to 62.3 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 52.6 per cent was recorded and in Perth there were 8 auction sales from 17 results. In Tasmania there was 2 sales from 5 results. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist For further comment or inquiries from the media please call 0409 198 350. *Weighted average

RP Data national auction preview; Week ending 18 May, 2014

There are 1,994 auctions scheduled across capital cities this week. This is 30 per cent more than last week and 31 per cent more this time last year. Volumes have increased over the last week in all cities with the exception of Canberra. Last weeks improved clearance rate, up 1.8 percentage points to 65 per cent was driven by stronger demand in Sydney. This week Melbourne has 979 auctions compared to 710 last week and there are improving conditions for buyers with clearance rates persistently in the low 60’s. Sydney continues to return strong clearance rates and this week there is a rise in auction numbers to 724 from 618. In Adelaide there are twice as many auctions with 115 expected compared to 57 last week. In Brisbane 112 auctions are expected following last week’s 89. There are 27 auctions expected in Canberra, 37 in Perth and 8 in Tasmania. Across Australia the highest volume of auctions will be found in Reservoir and Richmond in Melbourne, both of which have 20 scheduled. In Sydney the highest volume of auctions are in the inner northern suburb of Waverton with 12. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

RP Data Melbourne market preview; Week ending 18 May, 2014

There are 979 auctions scheduled this weekend in Melbourne compared to 738 for the same time last year. Conditions in the Melbourne auction market continue to be relatively cool. The clearance rate has exceeded 70 per cent only twice so far in 2014 and has been slowly drifting down since that time. As conditions are shifting in favour of buyers at auction the significant lift in volumes this week will prove to be a challenge for the market. Conditions in the private sale market remain tight with the latest time on market monthly data showing a new low for houses. In March the days on market for houses dropped to 35, the lowest on record. Time on market for units reached 37 days highlighting softer conditions in the higher density market as this is higher than the record low of 32 days in May 2010. Key data Preliminary clearance rate week ending 11 May: 61.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 18 May: 979 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 11 May: 38 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 11 May: -5.5 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 2.5 per cent higher in month ending 11 May seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The growing gap in the Melbourne market

In recent times the market for houses in Melbourne has outperformed, in terms of value growth, the unit market. In many respects this is due to increased supply and it also signifies a broader structural change in the market. According to the latest RP Data Rismark Home Value Index April results, the value of houses grew by 12.2 per cent over the last year and by 5.4 per cent over the first four months of this year. In comparison, the value of units has grown by 6.8 per cent over the last year and by 0.9 per cent this year. A review of data over the medium term shows that houses have consistently outperformed units in terms of value growth over time. In April the value of a unit was 70 per cent that of a house. A year ago unit values were 74 per cent that of houses and five years ago it was 75 per cent. Interestingly when the index commenced in 1995 unit values were 88 per cent of a house. Over that time unit sales as a proportion of all sales in Melbourne have risen from 28 per cent to 34 per cent. Houses have recorded stronger levels of value growth than units and as a result are becoming comparatively more expensive than units. The change in values and sales numbers is a reflection of a broad structural change in the Melbourne housing market. Over the past decade the number of medium and high density dwellings has grown as a consequence of planning policies, demand from buyers and affordability issues. As Melbourne continues to grow and requires more dwellings, the most efficient way to supply these new dwellings is through higher density homes. The majority of dwelling approvals in Melbourne are now for units as opposed to detached houses and state governments’ over the last decade have made it clear that in order to cater to the city’s growing population there will be more higher density housing. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Housing finance data for March 2014

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released housing finance data for March 2014 earlier today. The data showed that the number of owner occupier housing finance commitments fell by -0.9% in March. In value terms, lending to owner occupiers was -1.2% lower over the month and lending to investors was down -0.8%. Looking at the break-down of housing finance commitments by value over-time, you can see that on a 12 month average basis, the greatest proportion of lending over the past year has gone to investors 37.7% followed by: owner occupier subsequent purchasers non-first home buyers 36.7% , refinances by owner occupiers 17.6% and owner occupier first home buyers 7.9% . As the above chart shows, investment lending is at its highest level in a number of years and there has previously only ever been one period where investment lending was greater than lending to subsequent purchasers. The proportion of lending to first home buyers is at a record low, accounting for an average of 7.9% of the value of finance commitments over the 12 months to March 2014. Turning the focus to the monthly data on the number of owner occupier housing finance commitments, as mentioned these were -0.9% lower with refinance commitments down -1.0% and non-refinance commitments falling -0.9%. Despite the monthly fall, as the above chart shows, both refinances and non-refinances are trending higher albeit non-refinances in particular remain well below historic average levels. Over the month, owner occupier housing finance commitments to first home buyers increased by 12.2% which was the largest monthly rise since May 2012. Despite the monthly rise, first home buyer commitments remain slightly lower than a year ago -0.8% . As a proportion of total owner occupier finance commitments, first home buyers accounted for 12.6% of commitments in March, up from 12.5% in February but down from 14.1% in March 2013. The total value of investment housing finance commitments fell by -0.8% in March 2014 however, it has increased by 27.9% year-on-year. As mentioned, the proportion of investment commitments has, on average, been higher than owner occupier subsequent purchases over the past year. In March, investment finance commitments accounted for 39.1% of total finance commitments. The level of investment activity remains at a level which is well above average and of a magnitude not recorded since late in 2003. Although it is hard to bed down any timely and accurate statistics on overseas buyers it is important to note that if foreign buyers are purchasing with funds sourced from abroad, they are not captured in these figures. With the level of investment remaining stubbornly high, it is no wonder that the Reserve Bank continues to repeat its warning that housing in Australia is not a one-way bet. Obviously low mortgage rates coupled with strong value growth, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne is attracting the attention of investors. The potential challenge will be what happens next with investors once value growth slows and mortgage rates rise. The last time we saw investment activity at these levels we also witnessed a marked slowdown in value growth nationally. As an example, in Sydney, values began falling shortly thereafter and values took five and a half years to return to their previous peaks. Investors jumping into the market at this time should definitely bear this in mind. Overall, the monthly read on housing finance data was weak, however, the trend shows that demand for finance is continuing to escalate. In particular, investors and upgraders are really driving the housing market at the moment. However, the level of activity by owner occupiers purchasing homes as opposed to refinancing remains well below average levels. Obviously the rise in investment lending is to some extent restricting the level of lending to owner occupiers.

RP Data national auction review; Week ending 11 May, 2014

The preliminary auction clearance rate* of 67.4 per cent was recorded this week across capital cities compared to 62.3 per cent last week and 65.6 per cent this time last year. Volumes have been lower this week as the market heads into a traditionally quieter time in winter. The higher clearance rate is largely a factor of a stronger Sydney market where a preliminary clearance rate 76.1 per cent was recorded compared to 71.4 per cent last week. The higher national clearance rate does not represent a significant shift in the market and is broadly in line with the trend this year, particularly with the results prior to Easter and Anzac Day. In Melbourne a preliminary clearance rate of 63.4 per cent was recorded compared to 61.9 per cent last week. Last week’s Melbourne clearance rate was the lowest since late 2012 and is running counter to the established trend through the last year and also reflects moderating growth in property values. In Brisbane a preliminary clearance rate of 54.8 per cent was recorded compared to 42.4 per cent last week. Adelaide recorded a clearance rate of 60.5 per cent compared to 62.7 per cent last week. In Canberra a clearance rate of 58.8 per cent was recorded and in Perth there was one auction sale from eight results. In Tasmania there was two sales from three results. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist For further comment or inquiries from the media please call 0409 198 350. *Weighted average

RP Data National Auction Preview; Week ending 11 May, 2014

Auction volumes fell in all capital cities this week with around 1,376 expected compared to 2,053 last week. This change is consistent with last year’s activity as the market moves into the cooler months. Speculation surrounding the Federal Budget announcements next week is unlikely to have an impact on auctions as buyers and sellers generally made the decision to enter the market many weeks ago. Around the country, the largest volume of auctions is in Melbourne where 643 are expected compared to 891 last week. In Sydney, where there has already been 51 per cent more auctions than this time last year, 565 are expected compared to 821 last week. Adelaide is expecting 53 auctions compared to 97 last week. In Brisbane volumes have halved and are down to 70 from 142. In Canberra 31 auctions are scheduled; down from 47 last week while in Perth there are 14 auctions and 11 in Tasmania. Robert Larocca RP Data Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 11 May, 2014

There are 643 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 807 this weekend last year. This is a 20 per cent reduction and reflects the record 7 weekends with over 1,000 auctions already held. Last weekends clearance rate was the lowest since late December in 2012. The most popular areas for auctions this weekend are in the inner north where there are 10 in both Pascoe Vale and Preston. Melbourne is currently returning a below average clearance rate when compared to the market nationally and that should translate into better conditions for buyers over the next few months. The lower clearance rate should also indicate to vendors with an auction in the next month the importance of taking current market conditions into account when setting a selling price. Conditions eased slightly in the private sale market with time on market for houses stable at 33 days and vendor discounting still stable at -5.6 per cent. The lowest vendor discount on a suburban basis is in Armadale for units at -2.6 per cent followed by houses in Vermont at -2.7 per cent and houses in Bayswater South at -3 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 4 May: 61.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 11 May: 643 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 4 May: 35 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 4 May: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 7.5 per cent higher in month ending 4 May seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Highlights from the March 2014 building approvals data

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released dwelling approvals data for March 2014 earlier this week. Although the monthly reading recorded a fall, the trend of the data showed that the number of approvals is continuing to rise. Total dwelling approvals fell by -3.5% seasonally adjusted over the month however, they are still 20.0% higher year-on-year. House approvals fell by -0.5% over the month compared to a much larger -7.5% fall in the more volatile unit category. Year-on-year both houses and units have recorded a significant increase, up 19.1% and 21.3% respectively. The month-to-month index is inherently volatile; as a result we prefer to look at the rolling annual number of approvals. Over the 12 months to March 2013, there were 188,153 dwelling approvals nationally. This was the highest annual number of approvals since the 12 months to January 1995. Annual house approvals outweighed unit approvals with 104,598 and 83,554 approvals respectively. House approvals are at their highest level since April 2011 while unit approvals are currently at an all-time high. With interest rates currently set at low levels, population growth quite high and property values rising, developers are becoming more comfortable in seeking applications for new developments. Of course this is just the approval stage and it will be interesting to see what proportion of these approvals actually make it to commencement in the near-term. Across the individual capital city markets the annual number of approvals is also generally trending higher with record high approvals in some capitals. Following is the annual number of approvals across the capital cities with the annual change in brackets: Sydney 38,436 approvals 35.7% , 42,231 2.7% in Melbourne, 19,566 43.8% in Brisbane, 8,264 36.4% in Adelaide, 24,375 in Perth 45.1% , 770 5.8% in Hobart, 1,637 -23.7% in Darwin and 5,157 27.6% in Canberra. As you can see dwelling approvals are generally trending higher over the past year. In fact dwelling approvals over the year were at a record high level in Sydney and Perth. In Melbourne dwelling approvals are at their highest level since November 2011, Brisbane approvals are at their highest level since July 2004, in Adelaide approvals are at their highest level since August 2011, Hobart approvals are at their highest level since January 2013, Darwin approvals are trending lower and Canberra approvals are at their highest level since February 2012. The other interesting evolution of the market is the ongoing rise in prominence of unit approvals. The number of unit approvals is at a record high in both Sydney and Brisbane. As a proportion of all dwelling approvals, more than 50% of all approvals over the past year have been for units rather than houses in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Darwin and Canberra. Sydney has consistently approved more units than houses for the past 20 years and both Darwin and Canberra have approved more units than houses consistently since 2010. The rising prominence of unit approvals in Melbourne and Brisbane is a relatively new phenomenon with unit approvals over-taking those of houses in Melbourne from August 2012 and in Brisbane from June 2013. It is encouraging to see that dwelling approvals are trending higher nationally and across most capital cities. This is a desired outcome of low interest rates with the Reserve Bank hoping that a pick-up in dwelling construction can somewhat offset falling mining investment. New dwelling construction also has a significant multiplier effect throughout the economy creating jobs and encouraging additional retail spending. The main challenge will be that in many cities we are seeing an unprecedented level of units approved for construction. Certainly demand for units has risen over recent years however, the pipeline of approvals is at record levels which are not yet tested. Obviously most developments will need a level of presale to trigger finance to commence construction and it will be interesting to see how many of these unit approvals actually make it to construction phase over the coming months and years.

Investors up, first home buyers down in the Melbourne market

A unique and interesting feature of the current housing market in Victoria is not only a rise in investor activity, but the falling numbers of first home buyers. It may be easy to draw the conclusion that investors have forced first home buyers out of the market, however, this is not supported by the data available from the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS data, rather it indicates a rise in the overall share of all non first home buyers. Analysis of data from the ABS shows that the market share of local investors has been cyclical over the past decade. In the most recent twelve months investors represented 36.1 per cent of the total value of loans in Victoria compared to 34 per cent in the preceding twelve months. In the twelve months ending Feb 2011 – the last rising cycle – the proportion was 37 per cent. A similar rise was also evident in 2007 suggesting that as the market strengthens so too does the level of investor activity rise. Unlike investors the number of first home buyers have shrunk to record lows. In February there were 1,402 dwellings financed for first home buyers in Victoria, a mere 11.7 per cent of the entire number financed. This was lower than in January when they represented 12.7 per cent of the market. In raw terms, this is the lowest since July 1991 when the population of Victoria was also 31 per cent lower than it is today. More first home buyers are staying in rented accommodation or with family. During the last rising cycle, in 2010, there were a higher proportion of both first home buyers and investors. When home values last peaked, in October of 2010, the proportion of first home buyers was 18.2 per cent. Over that year investors were 37 per cent of the market in value terms. If first home buyers were being forced out by investors you would expect there to be a lower proportion in 2010 and 2007, yet this was not the case. Other factors have also changed for first home buyers including the levels of financial assistance. The state government now provides up front financial assistance for new homes only unlike in 2007 and 2010 when it was also available for established homes. And as prices are comparable in real terms with late 2010, there are clearly reasons other than investor activity for first home buyers now being such a small portion of the market. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

a wrap of the weekend auction markets: Week ending 4 May 2014

Auction volumes increase while clearance rates dip below the same time last year. After two subdued weeks for auctions, the number of auctions held across the combined capital cities increased this week, with 2,033 capital city properties taken to auction, compared to just 881 over the previous week. The preliminary clearance rate for last week was recorded at 66.3 per cent, having increased from 64.6 per cent the previous week. After an unseasonably strong start to the year, auction clearance rates are showing signs of softening, albeit only by a very small amount. One year ago, there were 1,749 capital city properties taken to auction and the auction clearance rate was recorded at 67.7 per cent. This is the first time so far this year where the current clearance rate has underperformed when compared to the same time one year ago. In Sydney last week, 817 auctions were scheduled and the preliminary clearance rate was recorded at 75.7 per cent, up from 71.3 per cent over the previous week when the auction market was much quieter, with 361 Sydney properties taken to auction. So far this year, Sydney has been the strongest performing auction market in terms of clearance rates and has continuously been stronger when compared to the same week last year, however, this gap is beginning to close, with the current clearance rate more reflective of the clearance rates seen across the city at the same time last year when the market was beginning to strengthen. A preliminary clearance rate of 63.7 per cent was recorded last week in Melbourne from 691 auction results with a total of 878 auctions scheduled across the city. At the same time last year, a clearance rate of 70.4 per cent was recorded from 822 auctions. The total number of auction results will rise to exceed the total from last year but the clearance rate will not. Auction demand for last week matched last month when a clearance rate of 62.3 per cent was recorded. Overall results for April were lower than the 69.4 per cent recorded in March. Much like Melbourne and Sydney, Brisbane recorded an increase in auction volumes last week, with 141 properties taken to auction across the city. The preliminary auction clearance rate for these properties was recorded at 42.5 per cent, down from 49.2 per cent the previous week across just 66 auctions. At the same time last year the Brisbane clearance rate was recorded at 45.1 per cent with 153 properties auctioned over the week. Last week, 98 Adelaide properties were taken to auction, up from 51 over the previous week. Similar to auction volumes, the auction clearance rate increased over the week from 64.4 per cent to 65.6 per cent. At the same time last year, conditions across the auction market were weaker with 92 auctions and a 56.4 per cent clearance rate. If we take a quick look around Australia’s other capital cities and regions performance was varied, much like it is most weeks. In Canberra there were 45 auctions with a clearance rate of 60 per cent, in Perth 40 properties were auctioned and the clearance rate was recorded at 50 per cent, while across the Northern Territory, 11 residential properties were taken to auction and the preliminary clearance rate was recorded at 37.5 per cent. Across Tasmania 14 properties were taken to auction over the week, but at this point RP Data has only collected 5 results, with no successful sales. Currently, RP Data is tracking 1,376 capital city auctions over the coming week. *Melbourne auction commentary provided by Robert Larocca, RP Data’s Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne home values record small drop in April

Melbourne house values recorded a very minor reduction in April with the latest RP Data Rismark Index results showing a change of -0.4 per cent. Over the last three months they have recorded a 1.7 per cent rise and in the last 12 months there has been a 12.2 per cent rise. The median house price based on settled sales over the last three months is was $615,000. The underlying health of the market is shown by the fact that over the last year only one capital city, Sydney, has recorded a greater rise in house values. At the same time the result should allay concerns that Melbourne was moving into a period of rapid and unsustainable property price growth. There is now a significant gap between units and houses. Unit values recorded a change of -1.6 per cent in April, over the last three months they have risen 0.7 per cent and in the past 12 months the rise is just over half that of houses at 6.8 per cent. Demand in the auction market also fell with a clearance rate in April of 63.8 per cent from 3,176 auctions in Melbourne. In March, which was a record month in terms of volumes, the clearance rate was 69.9 per cent from 5,322 auctions. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 4 May, 2014

There are 851 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 822 this weekend last year. It’s interesting to note that the suburbs which have had the highest volume of houses for sale as a proportion of the total number of homes over the past year are found in the Mornington Peninsula. Mount Eliza had 8.6 per cent of its housing stock on the market followed by 7.9 per cent in Mount Martha and in Safety Beach. At the other end of the spectrum is the highly sought after Fitzroy North where a mere 2.6 per cent of houses were on the market. Given the high demand in Fitzroy North there is no doubt that if more homes were on the market they would find sellers. Conditions remain tight in the private sale market with time on market for houses stable at 33 days and vendor discounting also stable at -5.6 per cent. Key data Preliminary clearance rate week ending 20 April: 63 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 4 May: 851 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 27 April: 33 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 27 April: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 13.5 per cent higher in month ending 27 April seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne suburbs where rents have dropped

In March 2009, the median advertised rent for a house in Melbourne was $379 per week compared to $442 this year. This has equated to a rise of 16.6 per cent over 5 years. Surprisingly there are a number of suburbs where renters have not faced comparable rises and there are even some suburbs where rents have actually dropped. Three of the four suburbs where rents have fallen are growth suburbs; Doreen, Mernda and Sandhurst. These suburbs are unique cases as the supply of homes is very strong resulting in distortion in the data compared to more established areas. In this case it has resulted in reductions in the advertised rent. Advertised rents in Doreen have dropped by 6.4 per cent over 5 years, similar to nearby Mernda which recorded a fall of 5.9 per cent. Sandhurst rents dropped by 2.6 per cent. Rents have also fallen in Ormond and barely changed in Toorak; both suburbs have comparatively expensive houses and this highlights a trend of poor growth in rents in expensive suburbs. With very low yields in the more expensive suburbs investors are more motivated by the strong capital growth that can be found and renters in this price bracket are clearly in a very different market to the majority of renters in Melbourne. Other similar suburbs in the top 20 for low rental growth are Canterbury, Wonga Park, Caulfield, Ashburton and Hawthorn East. This highlights that by targeting certain areas renters can find homes where rents do not continually rise. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

a wrap of the weekend auction markets: Week ending 27 April 2014

On the back of low auction volumes, the preliminary auction clearance rate fell to the lowest reading so far this year. Because of the ANZAC day long weekend, for the second week in a row, auction volumes across the combined capital cities were low. A total of 859 auctions were held across the capital cities, compared to 642 the previous week and the preliminary auction clearance rate fell from 65.5 per cent the previous week to 64.0 per cent last week. This is the lowest clearance rate seen so far this year and the lowest clearance rate since June last year. Volumes are expected to ramp up again over the coming week, with RP Data expecting 1,927 auctions to be held across the capital cities. Much like last week, because auction volumes were much lower than usual, we will just provide some key stats to give a wrap up of the auction markets over the week:

Week ending 27 April, 2014

There are 349 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne. Whilst higher than last weekend volumes are lower than usual due to Anzac Day. RP Data captured 43 auction results across Melbourne last week with 25 successful sales recorded; however, due to the very low volume a clearance rate would not be statistically reliable. The number of active buyers and sellers is clearly higher than it was over the past three years however as first home buyers are at record lows the improved demand is coming from other segments. Data shows that there are a proportionally higher numbers of ‘upgraders’ and ‘investors’ that was the case in the last rising market in 2009. This highlights a fundamental difference to the last few cycles in the market as not only is this one shallower so far but there is a different mix of buyers. Key data Clearance rate week ending 20 April: NA due to low volumes Melbourne auctions expected week ending 27 April: 349 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 20 April: 33 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 20 April: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 19.4 per cent higher in month ending 20 April seasonally adjusted Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Inflation remains contained within the RBAs target range

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released Consumer Price Index figures for the March 2014 quarter earlier today. The data showed that over the first quarter of the year inflation was recorded at 0.6%, down from 0.8% over the final quarter of last year. Over the past year, inflation has been recorded at 2.9%. The Reserve Bank RBA has an annual inflation target of between 2% to 3% over the medium term and although the reading is at the higher end of that band it is still within the range. Interestingly, non-tradable or domestic inflation was outside of the target range at 3.1% but has fallen from 4.2% a year ago. On the other hand, tradable or imported inflation was recorded at 2.6% up from -0.2% a year ago. Turning the focus specifically to housing, the housing component of CPI has increased by 3.6% over the 12 months to March 2014, its lowest annual reading since June 2012. Across the housing sub-categories, new dwelling purchases by owner occupiers rose by 2.4% over the year with relatively tame growth also recorded for: maintenance and repair of the dwelling 2.5% , rents 2.9% and other housing 4.7% . Water and sewerage recorded the greatest annual rise at 10.8% followed by: property rates and charges 7.9% , gas and other household fuels 6.9% , utilities 6.8% and electricity 5.2% . The 2.9% annual increase in rents was the lowest reading since June 2006. Similarly, the 5.2% annual increase in electricity was the lowest annual rise since June 2007. On the other hand, the 10.8% annual increase in water and sewerage was the greatest rise since the 12 months to June 2011. Another important consideration is the impact of inflation on home values. Calculating ‘real’ home values by adjusting the RP Data-Rismark Home value Index for inflation provides valuable insight. As the above chart highlights, once you adjust for the impact of inflation the level of capital growth over the longer term is much lower. In fact, when you adjust for inflation, combined capital city home values peaked in the September 2010 quarter and are still -1.8% lower than that level. Over the 12 months to March 2014, combined capital city home values have increased by 10.6% however, when you adjust for inflation the rise has been a lower 7.5%. Across each city the rate of capital growth over the year is somewhat lower when you adjust for inflation and markets such as Hobart and Canberra which have recorded low levels of value growth have actually recorded value falls. Home values across the combined capital cities are currently 7.2% higher than their previous peak according to the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Index. However, as mentioned above, when values are adjusted for inflation the story is quite different with values -1.8% lower. Across every capital city except for Sydney home values are lower than their previous peak in inflation adjusted terms. Looking at the compound annual rate of value growth over the past five, ten and 15 years in inflation adjusted terms you can see some interesting trends. Sydney home values have increased at an annual rate of 3.6% over the past 5 years, but earlier soft market conditions have resulted in value growth of just 0.4% pa over the past decade. Brisbane home values have fallen at a rate of -2.3% pa over the past five years and over the same period Adelaide home values are -1.0% lower pa, Perth values have fallen by -0.2% pa and Hobart values have declined by -3.1% each year. Over the past decade, Darwin has been the standout performer with values rising by 5.9% pa and the weakest market has been Hobart where values have fallen at a rate of -0.1% each year. With mortgage rates at such low levels and the 10 years of no ‘real’ growth in Sydney home values it goes some way to explaining the rising demand and surging home values. Melbourne is also seeing strong capital growth but when compared to Sydney has been a much stronger capital growth performer over the past decade. Despite a weak five years in terms of capital growth we are yet to really see the housing market heat up in Brisbane and Adelaide. In Perth the housing market was strong early in this growth phase however; capital growth is now fading despite the fact that values are still lower in real terms than they were 5 years ago.

a wrap of the weekend auction markets: Week ending 20 April 2014

Long weekend and a rest across the auction markets. Auction volumes fell by over 80 per cent over the week which had been predicted in advance given that over the past five years we have consistently seen a sharp drop in auction volumes over the Easter weekend, this only being heightened by Anzac day falling on the following Friday. There were 625 auctions held across the capital cities last week and currently, RP Data is only expecting 799 over the coming week. Based on this week’s low volumes, we won’t look at each of the capital city auction markets in the same way that we usually do, but here are some key stats from last week that provide a good summary.

RP Data Pain and Gain Report has lessons for property investment

The recently released RP Data Pain and Gain report shows some of the keys to gaining a good return on residential property by analysing the sales outcomes from thousands of resales; the sale price is compared with the original purchase price and the profit or lack of made by the seller is then calculated and takes into account the time taken to achieve a result.. Sellers and buyers of property also face transactional costs such as taxes that need to be taken into account when this information is applied to a single property. The most important factor here is the time the property is held. Short-term property ownership – flicking as it is sometimes known – is clearly a high risk strategy. The report shows that even in a year where we’ve seen price rises, 12.8 per cent of all owners who purchased and sold in the same year made a loss. Australia-wide, 55.1 per cent of those owned for between 10 and 15 years sold for at least double the original purchase price. Within Melbourne, the results across Council areas make this clearer. Only 6 per cent of homes resold in the December quarter returned a loss. As an example,this was higher in growth suburbs such as in the City of Whittlesea where 14.2 per cent of resales recorded a loss and the average hold period was a mere 3 years. In contrast the average hold periods to return a profit were between 8 and 13 years; for instance in the City of Monash 97.3 per cent of resales returned an average profit of $394,250 with an average hold period of 12.9 years. Another strong point of interest in the report is the importance of timing;the property market is cyclical so those who buy at the peak of the market must ensure they are not selling at the following trough as shown by the fact that homes purchased after January 1st, 2008, had a higher propensity to return a loss. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 20 April, 2014

There are 49 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne; the total volume of auctions is affected by the upcoming Easter and Anzac Day public holidays. The lower volume of auctions does not reflect the broader level of supply with overall volumes continuing to rise. The high level of supply is having an impact on prices with a slight depreciation being recorded so far this month in the Melbourne Home Price Index. The key issue for the Melbourne property market after Anzac Day will be the supply of homes. The RP Data Mortgage market activity shows that so far, the number of buyers has risen to match the higher levels of supply with mortgage activity events higher than a month ago in Victoria. As activity is generally reduced over winter the high level of supply will be a challenge for the market. Key data Clearance rate week ending 13 April: 64.4 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 20 April: 49 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 13 April: 34 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 13 April: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.5 per cent higher in month ending 13 April Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

First home buyers in Victoria the lowest in 23 years

From a first home buyer perspective, there is something very wrong with the housing market in Victoria. In February, the most recent data available from the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS showed that the total number of dwellings financed for first home buyers had sunk to a 23 year low. In February there were 1,402 dwellings financed for first home buyers which represented a mere 11.76 per cent of the entire number financed. This was lower than in January when first home buyers represented 12.7 per cent of the market and the lowest in raw terms since July 1991 when the population of Victoria was 31 per cent less than it is today. The reasons behind this result are debatable. Some will say that the causes are high property prices, but this alone is not borne out by the data. When home values last peaked, in October of 2010, the proportion of first home buyers was 18.2 per cent. In real terms, prices are not significantly different at this point which suggests that the problem is not entirely the price. Others point to the fact that rents are not rising and suggest that intending first home buyers prefer to rent. Another perspective is that the change to financial assistance for first home buyers has caused many to not enter the market. At the same time as the large step down in the proportion of first home buyers occurred in the middle of last year, the $7,000 First Home Buyer Grant for established homes came to an end. This alone cannot be the only issue as at the same time stamp duty was being progressively lowered for first home buyers. The reasoning for this change in the market is probably a combination of all issues mentioned and if the market remains this way, it will represent a significant structural change in the local housing market. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Our capital city population is booming but the supply side not so much

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has recently released demographic data at a capital city level to June 2013. We have previously covered the population data on this blog however, when the data is paired with dwelling approvals data over the same period there are some very interesting findings. Over the 12 months to June 2013, the population of the combined capital cities increased by a total of 313,387 persons. At the same time, there were 114,825 capital city dwelling approvals over the period. Based purely on the ratio of population growth to dwelling approvals, there was 1 dwelling approved for construction for every 2.73 residents added to the capital cities. At a national level, the 2011 Census reported that average people per household at that time was 2.6 persons. Based on that figure you can see that population growth has exceeded dwelling approvals over the past year. Of course measuring demand for housing is not quite so simple. Although it is a bit old now, the former Deputy Governor of the Reserve Bank RBA gave a speech entitled ‘Housing and the Economy’ to the National Housing Conference in November 2009 which is available here. In the speech he posed the question, ‘Are we building enough dwellings?’ Two of the most interesting revelations from the speech were: A higher proportion of the new dwellings built are simply replacing existing homes that have been demolished. The RBA estimated that between 2001 and 2006, around 15% of new dwellings built replaced those that had been demolished; 10-15 years earlier that figure was less than 10%. A significant proportion of dwelling investment appears to have gone into holiday homes or second homes. Census data 2006 Census shows that the number of dwellings built has exceeded the increase in the number of households by a large margin. As a result, the ratio of the number of dwellings to the number of households has been rising over time; as at 2006, there were 8% more dwellings in Australia than there were households. Presumably, most of this surplus reflects holiday houses and second houses. So at a national level, the Former Deputy Governor’s speech suggested that in order to cater to dwelling replacements and secondary homes we need to construct 23% more dwellings than the previous simplistic analysis of measuring the rate of population growth compared to approvals. Also keep in mind here that we are looking at approvals, they won’t necessarily all go on to become commencements and ultimately completions. An assumption we could make here is that, holiday and second homes are generally more likely to be situated outside rather than inside a capital city. As a result, the second revelation detailed above is probably not going to have as much of an impact at a capital city level. Nevertheless we still have to allow for the 15% of homes which have been demolished when looking at the approvals data. Across individual capital cities, the 2011 Census reported that on average; Sydney, Brisbane and Darwin had 2.7 persons per household, Melbourne, Perth and the Australian Capital Territory had 2.6 persons per household and Adelaide and Hobart had 2.4 persons per household. Returning to the original findings, over the year to June 2013, the capital city population increased by 313,387 persons and 114,825 dwellings were approved for construction. If we adjust for average household sizes as per the 2011 Census, to match population growth there would have ideally been a slightly higher 119,135 approvals over the year. If we then further adjust for the assumption that we should approve 15% more homes to replace demolitions, there should have been 137,005 dwellings approved for construction last year, a shortfall of 22,180 capital city approvals. As the above chart shows, the supply of new dwelling approvals was generally quite sufficient through the 1990s however, throughout the 2000’s new dwelling approvals have been insufficient in relation to the level of population growth. We are now seeing rising dwelling approvals on the back of escalating housing demand and rising home values which is encouraging however, it will have to continue for many years to make up for the insufficient supply response over the past decade or so. In Sydney and Melbourne, there was one home approved for every 2.72 and 2.48 new residents respectively indicating a level of supply closer to equilibrium with demand over the most recent year. New supply remains very much insufficient in Brisbane and Perth where 1 new home was approved for every 3.26 new residents in Brisbane and 3.45 new residents in Perth. The following charts track the annual population growth and the annual number of dwelling approvals across each capital city. As the above charts show, the disconnect between the level of population growth and dwelling approvals over the past decade have been greatest within our largest capital cities. It is no coincidence that these cities are also the regions that have been recording the greatest increase in population over this period. A further important consideration when looking at the relationship between population growth and dwelling approvals is the type of product that is being developed for the market. While the city-wide analysis is valuable new housing typically comes in the form of new houses on the outskirts of the city or medium to high density product within the inner city areas. Over time, we are seeing a shift away from greenfield housing development in most capital cities towards infill higher density development. Over the year to June 1991, 29.9% of all new dwelling approvals across the combined capital cities were for units as opposed to houses. In June 2013, 49.7% of all dwelling approvals over the year were for units. Over the year, there were more units than houses approved for construction in Sydney 66.1% , Melbourne 52.7% , Brisbane 50.1% , Darwin 64.5% and Canberra 54.9% . The unit category type includes townhouses and semi-detached homes as well as units. The 2011 Census reported that across the separate house category, the most prevalent number of bedrooms is 3 bedrooms 49.6% and 4 bedrooms 32.4% . When you combine the results for semi-detached and units the most prevalent number of bedrooms is 2 bedrooms 50.1% and three bedrooms 28.6% . To look at it another way, 88.8% of detached houses have three bedrooms or more compared to 66.9% of units having 2 bedrooms or fewer. The point here is that if you are going to deliver more units to the market, they typically have fewer bedrooms and therefore are likely to have a smaller average household size than a detached house would. As a result, it is likely that as the delivery of units increases there actually needs to be a greater number of units constructed in order to cater for population growth than there would have been if houses were exclusively built. It is clear for the analysis that particularly within the four largest capital cities there has been a growing deficiency of dwellings approved for construction over recent years when compared to population growth. Over the past 12 to 18 months there has been a noticeable rise in dwelling approvals however they will have to continue to rise over coming years to make up for the deficiency over recent years. Particularly in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane we are seeing a push to greater density in the inner city areas. So how do we fix the supply side problems? There are many solutions but I think in the main we need to approve new developments faster, increase developable land both in the inner city and within greenfield areas and reduce the costs of new development to the developer because these costs are ultimately passed on to consumers. Remember that developers are commercial entities looking to make the best possible returns for shareholders. Maybe it is time to look at ways that we can incentivise developers to bring vacant land to the market quicker rather than land banking land and drip-feeding it to the market. Whether that be an additional tax on undeveloped land or some sort of financial incentive to bring stock to the market I am not sure but it is clear that particularly within the major capital cities the current conditions are not working and finding a way to increase the supply of new dwellings is imperative.

a wrap of the weekend auction markets: Week ending 13 April 2014

Auction volumes high across the capital cities, with Sydney breaking all time record. There were a total of 3,491 capital city auctions held across Australia last week, up from 2,692 over the previous week. With auction volumes at the highest levels seen so far this year, clearance rates increased from 66.2 per cent over the previous week to 68.9 per cent last week with Sydney driving the strong clearance rate. As mentioned a couple of weeks ago, we had expected auction volumes to peak before the Easter break as the next couple of weeks are likely to be pretty quiet on the auction front. At the same time last year, the final auction clearance rate was recorded at 61.8% with 1,410 capital city properties having been taken to auction. There were 1,471 auctions held across Sydney last week, which means auction volumes have risen by nearly 30 per cent when compared to the previous week when there were 1,137 Sydney auctions. Despite this jump in auction volumes, the total number of auctions in Sydney was slightly less than in Melbourne over the week; however it was a record high for the city. Sydney’s preliminary clearance rate was resilient last week, despite the increased volumes, recorded at a sturdy 78.5 per cent, compared to 73.2 per cent over the previous week and just 67.2 per cent at the same time last year, when there were 529 auctions held across the city. At this stage, we expect just 392 Sydney auctions to be held over the coming week, with most of these occurring prior to Friday. A preliminary clearance rate of 64.2 per cent was recorded last week in Melbourne from 1,143 auction results compared to 63.6 per cent recorded the previous week and 66.5 per cent at the same time last year. This weekend brings to a close the busiest first quarter for auctions in the city’s history. Compared to this time last year there have been 58 per cent more auctions held. For the next two weeks the market will see significantly reduced volumes with Easter and Anzac Day causing many vendors to have already had their auctions or wait. In terms of an increase in auction volumes over the week, Brisbane was the stand out last week, with auction volumes almost doubling. There were 236 residential properties taken to auction in Brisbane last week and the preliminary auction clearance rate was recorded at 45.7 per cent, compared to a final auction clearance rate of 52.8 per cent over the previous week when there were 123 Brisbane auctions. At the same time last year, just fewer than 100 auctions were held across the city and the clearance rate for the week was recorded at a 36.4 per cent. Last week was the second week so far this year where there have been more than 230 Brisbane auctions over the week. To put that into perspective, the average number of weekly auctions held over 2013 was 137, while so far this year, there has been an average of just under 150 auctions per week. Adelaide’s preliminary clearance rate for last week was recorded at a strong 73.8 per cent, up from 62.1 per cent over the previous week. Much like most of the other concentrated auction markets, Adelaide saw volumes increase over the week from 98 to 144. At the same time last year, Adelaide’s clearance rate was a lower 47.4 per cent across the 63 properties that were taken to auction. Despite the overall increase in auction volumes over the week, there were three cities Canberra, Darwin and Hobart where the number of properties taken to auction last week was actually lower than the preceding week. Taking a quick look around the cities, Perth’s clearance rate was almost unchanged last week at 33.3 per cent across 55 auctions, Hobart saw a clearance rate of 50.0 per cent with 16 auctions held across the city, Canberra had 50 auctions and a preliminary clearance rate of 65.5 per cent and so far, one Darwin property has been reported as having successfully sold at auction. RP Data is tracking just 590 auctions over the coming week with many of these auctions just over 500 scheduled prior to the Easter weekend. *Melbourne auction commentary provided by Robert Larocca, RP Data’s Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 13 April, 2014

There are 1,412 auctions scheduled this week in Melbourne compared to 626 this time last year. With 1,400 also scheduled in Sydney this weekend will provide a rare opportunity to compare the two capital city auction markets. The unprecedented increase in the number of auctions is part of a wider rise in homes on the market over the last month. There are now 22 per cent more new listings compared to last year across Victoria which ensures a high level of choice for buyers. This high level of volumes should also keep the clearance rate in the mid 60′s. In the month ending 6 April, there were 60,820 homes on the market in Victoria of which 33,209 were in Melbourne. The total number of homes on the market is reducing due to the higher number of buyers compared to a year ago. This is also evident in the level of vendor discounting recorded for homes for private sale. Vendor discounting for houses was 6.1 per cent compared to 6.7 per cent in February a year ago. Key data Clearance rate week ending 6 April: 63.6 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 13 April: 1412 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 6 April: 34 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 6 April: -5.5 per cent houses Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Housing finance data for February 2014

Housing finance data for February 2014 was released early today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS . The data showed that over the month there were 52,460 owner occupier housing finance commitments. The number of owner occupier housing finance commitments was at its highest level since October 2009 over the month. Owner occupier housing finance commitments increased by 2.3% over the month and 13.8% year-on-year. Owner occupier housing finance commitments are split into refinance commitments and non-refinance commitments. Refinance commitments have increased by 6.0% over the month and 15.8% higher over the year. Non-refinance commitments rose by 0.6% over the month and by 12.9% over the year. Refinance commitments are currently at their highest level since April 2008. Looking at the value of housing finance commitments, owner occupier non-refinance commitments are up 0.3% over the month, owner occupier refinance commitments are 6.0% higher and refinance commitments are 4.4% higher. On a year-on-year basis, owner occupier non-refinance commitments have increased by 17.5%, owner occupier refinance commitments are 27.9% higher and investment finance commitments are 32.3% higher. As a proportion of all housing finance commitments over the month, owner occupier non-refinance commitments accounted for 43.4% of lending, investment commitments accounted for 38.8% of lending and owner occupier refinance commitments accounted for 17.8%. As the chart shows, the proportion of lending to investors is high on an historical basis and remains at their highest levels since late 2003. As a proportion of all lending to owner occupiers, first home buyers continue to show a relatively small level of market participation. In February 2014, first home buyers accounted for 12.5% of all lending to owner occupiers. The 12.5% was down from 13.2% in January 2014 and also down from 14.4% at the same time in 2013. Although the proportion of lending to first home buyers is lower, the number of first home buyer loans was 0.6% higher over the month but -1.5% lower year-on-year. The RP Data Mortgage Index RMI shows a strong correlation with the ABS owner occupier housing finance commitments data. The benefit of the RMI is that it is a more timely indicator of finance commitments produced each week. At the end of March 2014 the index had recorded a further increase in activity indicating that the housing finance data results for March 2014 when released in a month’s time are likely to show a further rise in owner occupier housing finance commitments.

Private sale market in Melbourne continues to tighten

The weekly auction market may capture the attention of many but just under 70 per cent of all homes in Melbourne are sold at private sale. While this market segment may not have a convenient weekly statistic that summarises the level of demand and supply, other data in RP Data’s suite of information supports a similar role. RP Data calculates the time on market for homes for sale at private sale and also the level of vendor discounting. These statistics are available at a metropolitan, council and suburb level. For the purposes of a broad market indicator, the metropolitan wide numbers are the most stable and reliable in a statistical sense. The most recent time on market data is for the month of February. It showed that the average time between advertising and the contract of sale being signed was 57 days for houses and 65 for units in Melbourne. For the housing market, this is considerably stronger than last year when it was 72 days, however, the unit market is showing the impact of high levels of new supply as it is now longer than a twelve months when it appeared as 60 days. As new listings are almost one third higher than this time last year, the current numbers paint a picture of a remarkably healthy market. It also reflects the fact that vendor discounting is also lower at -6.1 per cent for houses compared to -6.7 per cent a year ago and -5.8 per cent compared to -6.5 per cent for units. This data shows that conditions present in the auction market are also apparent in the private sale across Melbourne. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

a wrap of the weekend auction markets: Week ending 6 April 2014

Melbourne’s preliminary clearance rate falls to the lowest reading so far this year. There were 2,669 auctions held across the combined capital cities last week, having fallen from 3,039 over the previous week. While volumes were down when compared to the previous week, it is expected that this coming week will change that with auction volumes set to rise by 23 per cent. Last week the preliminary auction clearance rate was recorded at 67.3 per cent across the capital cities, compared to a final auction clearance rate of 67.7 per cent the previous week. At the same time last year, there were 1,308 capital city auctions and the final auction clearance rate was recorded at 61.7 per cent. In similar fashion to previous weeks, Sydney has recorded the strongest capital city auction clearance rate at 75.4 per cent based on preliminary collection. There were 1,124 auctions held across the city last week, compared to 1,163 the previous week when the final auction clearance rate was recorded at 75.9 per cent. It is probably a good time to make mention of the fact that we have noticed over the past few weeks that we are seeing some downward revision each week when Sydney’s final results are being calculated. This is more than likely due to the reporting culture of auctions, where agents hold off on reporting their successful auction until they can confirm that no after auction result has been obtained. Over the same week last year, there were 528 Sydney properties taken to auction with 66.4 per cent of these recording a successful result. While Sydney’s auction market showed significant strength over the first quarter of 2014, it is interesting to see that this aligned with overall market performance. According to the RP Data-Rismark Daily Home Value Index, Sydney dwelling values increased by 4.4 per cent over the March 2014 quarter. Based on the most recent weekly update, across the private treaty market, Sydney homes are currently selling at the fastest rate of any capital city. For Melbourne there were 1,204 auctions across the city last week with a preliminary clearance rate of 63.4 per cent recorded from 960 auction results compared to 66.9 per cent recorded last weekend and 63.2 per cent this weekend last year. Over March 2014 the clearance rate was 69.9 per cent from 5,322 auctions. House and unit values are definitely rising but the high auction volumes are continuing to provide buyers with increased opportunity which is also likely contributing to a lower clearance rates as buyers have a greater number of auction properties to choose from. Last week across the Brisbane auction market we saw conditions improve with the preliminary auction clearance rate recorded at 57.9 per cent, with 122 Brisbane auctions held over the week. Despite the strengthening clearance rate, last week was a sharp fall in Brisbane auction volumes after the busy week prior when there were 238 auctions held and a clearance rate of 47.1 per cent, however, over the coming week volumes are set to ramp up again, with 218 Brisbane auction scheduled so far. When we look at the Brisbane auction market at the same time last year, there were significantly less auctions 92 while the clearance rate was recorded at 49.3 per cent, which is generally on par with the current market performance. There were 98 Adelaide properties taken to auction last week, with the preliminary clearance rate coming in at 67.3 per cent, compared to the previous week when the final clearance rate was recorded at 55.6 per cent across 107 auctions. At the same time last year, there were 54 Adelaide properties auctioned over the week, with half of the properties recording a successful result at the time of reporting. Once again, auction activity across the other capital cities was much more subdued and again, results were mixed. There were 33 auctions held in Perth last week and the preliminary clearance rate was recorded at 26.7 per cent. Across Hobart, 22 properties went to auction with a clearance rate of 50.0 per cent and a 43.8 per cent clearance rate in Canberra across 66 auctions. There were 8 auctions held in Darwin last week and so far RP Data has captured a result for 5 of these auctions. At this point, no successful results have been recorded. There are currently 3,271 auctions being tracked by RP Data over the coming week, in what is set to be a busy week leading up to Easter. *Melbourne auction commentary provided by Robert Larocca, RP Data’s Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 6 April, 2014

There are twice as many auctions this week as there was this time last year. This week RP Data is expecting 1,120 auctions in Melbourne compared to only 554 this time last year. Last weeks result showed that increased stock numbers at auction and in the market generally are having an impact with a comparatively low clearance rate recorded. The increased stock numbers should be welcomed by buyers as it acts to moderate price growth in what is an otherwise tight market. Key data Preliminary clearance rate week ending 30 March: 66.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 6 April: 1,120 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 30 March: 35 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 30 March: -5.5 per cent houses Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne home value growth tops the nation

Melbourne property values have increased in March as demand strengthened leading to the largest rise of all capital cities over the first quarter of 2014. The Melbourne property market has now moved from recovery into a growth phase. This has been welcomed by the increasing number of vendors who are now more likely to see reserves at auction surpassed and lower level of discounting in private sales. The March release of the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Index showed that house values in Melbourne rose by 2.3 per cent over the month and unit prices increased by 1.9 per cent. Over the first quarter of the year house value growth outstripped units rising 5.8 per cent compared to 2.5 per cent. Total listings of residential property are falling whilst new listings are rising strongly – 32 per cent in last month, highlighting the strong levels of demand. This is also evident in the more expensive auction segment. In raw terms the Melbourne has seen record volumes of residential auctions this March with around 5,300 being held. This surpassed the previous high in the past five years of 3,600 in 2012. Comparing this month in previous years is difficult due to Easter and some months having 5 weekends. After taking all the various and moveable holidays over March into account there is no doubt the Melbourne market has seen a surge in the number of auctions, surpassing last year by 28 per cent. This is less of a change in volume than between 2009 and 2010 but is still highly significant. The preliminary clearance rate for March was 69.5 per cent, a healthy result in light of the stock levels. This is consistent that recorded in December last year. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Housing market is absorbing new supply faster than it is being added

The number of unique residential properties advertised for sale across the country over the four weeks to 30 March 2014 was recorded at 243,941. This figure consists of 47,805 newly listed properties over the four weeks and 196,136 re-listed properties. As highlighted by the RP Data listings index, there has been a surge in the number of new properties listed for sale and they are 18.9% higher than they were at the same time a year ago. Although new listings have surged, total properties advertised for sale are -3.8% lower than they were a year ago which is reflective of the rapid rate of sale we are seeing nationally. Although new listings are way up on a year ago, the rate of sale is much faster and total listings are falling. To put it simply, properties are being absorbed by the market faster than they are being listed for sale. Looking at the different residential property types; new listings for houses are 20.2% higher than they were a year ago however, total house listings are -4.5% lower. New unit listings are also significantly higher, up 22.6% while total unit listings are -5.1% lower. New vacant land listings are -5.4% lower than they were a year ago however, total listings are 2.1% higher. Looking across the individual capital cities, each region except for Canberra -12.0% is recording a higher number of new properties listed for sale than they were a year ago. Sydney and Melbourne, which are also recording the strongest capital growth conditions, have recorded the largest rise in new listings over the year, up 49.7% and 32.0% respectively compared with a year ago. Clearly new properties are coming to the market in both cities however, evidence suggests that most are selling quite shortly after the listing. Although new capital city property listings are generally higher than they were a year ago, total listings are generally much lower than they were a year ago. Across the combined capital cities total listings are -8.3% lower than they were a year ago and each city except Hobart 3.3% and Darwin 25.2% is recording fewer total listings. Although both Sydney and Melbourne are each recording fewer total properties advertised for sale than a year ago, it is interesting to note that total listings in Melbourne 33,144 are significantly higher than in Sydney 22,423 . It is encouraging to see that a greater number of new residential properties are coming to the market than at the same time last year however, it is important to remember that in most regions sales transactions are much higher than they were a year ago. Clearly buyer demand has escalated and quality properties are not staying on the market for a long period of time which is highlighted by the fact that total listings both at a national and capital city level are lower than they were a year ago.

a wrap of the weekend auction markets: Week ending 30 March 2014

Clearance rates slip while the capital cities see the highest auction volumes so far this year. Last week was the busiest week so far this year for capital city auctions, with 3,009 properties taken to auction, increasing from 2,466 over the previous week. Although auction volumes increased across the capital cities last week, the same cannot be said for the auction clearance rate, which fell slightly over the week, down from a final clearance rate of 69.4 per cent the previous week to a preliminary 68.8 per cent. It is expected that the next two weeks will be busy across each of the major capital city auction markets in preparation for a slow down around Easter and Anzac Day, with two consecutive long weekends in a row. To put the ‘slow down’ into perspective, over Easter weekend last year, there were only 547 capital city auctions, down from 2,649 the previous week, and the clearance rate fell from 64.1 per cent the week prior to 58.7 per cent over the Easter weekend. So far this year, Sydney has consistently been the strongest performing auction market in terms of clearance rates. This week was no different, with the preliminary auction clearance rate for Sydney recorded at 79.5 per cent, up from 76.1 per cent over the previous week. There were 1,151 auctions held in Sydney this week, the third time this year where auction volumes have been above 1,000 across the city. At the end of last year, Sydney was consistently recording 1,000 plus auctions on a week-to-week basis throughout November and leading up to Christmas. With the RP Data-Rismark end of month figures out tomorrow, it is fair to say that it has been a strong month across the Sydney property market. A preliminary clearance rate of 65.9 per cent was recorded across Melbourne this weekend from 1,121 auction results compared to 69.4 per cent recorded last weekend. This is the lowest clearance rate this year, but is consistent with the middle of December last year when there were 1,616 auctions. Last weekend’s result reflects the high volumes where this month, there has been an average of around 1,060 auctions per week. This is a record high for auction volumes in March and has provided buyers with a very high level of choice. For this year, there has been 5 weeks so far where more than 1,000 properties have been taken to auction, compared to just 2 weeks at the same time last year. Brisbane recorded a rise in auction clearance rates this week, with the preliminary clearance recorded at 45.5 per cent, compared to 37.3 per cent over the previous week. The number of residential Brisbane properties taken to auction last week was much higher than the previous week and much higher than anything we have seen so far this year. There were 237 auctions across Brisbane last week, compared to 130 the previous week. So far this year, the average number of properties being taken to auction in Brisbane is around 16 per cent higher than in 2013. There were 107 Adelaide properties taken to auction last week, with a preliminary auction clearance rate of 62.9 per cent. Over the previous week, Adelaide’s final auction clearance rate was recorded at 58.8 per cent, with 80 properties taken to auction over the week. For the smaller auction markets of Perth, Hobart, Canberra and Darwin, results were mixed over the week. There were 54 auctions held in Perth, with a preliminary clearance rate of 45.0 per cent, 11 auctions held across Hobart with a clearance rate of 25 per cent, 50 Canberra auction with a clearance rate of 60.0 per cent and finally, Darwin had a preliminary clearance rate of 40 per cent, with just 9 auctions held across the city. RP Data is currently tracking 2,491 capital city properties going to auction for the coming week. *Melbourne auction commentary provided by Robert Larocca, RP Data’s Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Analysis of the ABS Demographic Data release for September 2013

Today the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released its quarterly demographic statistics for September 2013. Unfortunately this data set has a significant reporting lag nevertheless it is still a valuable regular release. Over the September 2013 quarter, the national population increased by 100,556 persons or by 0.4%. Throughout the 12 months to September 2013, the national population has increased by 1.8% from 22.8 million persons to 23.2 million persons 405,446 new residents . Looking at the components of national population growth, natural increase or births minus deaths was recorded at 164,428 persons over the past year and was 2.9% higher compared to September 2012. In fact, the rate of natural increase is now at a record high level. The other component of population growth at a national level is net overseas migration. Over the 12 months to September 2013, there were 241,018 net overseas migrants; the figure was 1.0% higher than over the previous year. Although net overseas migration was higher over the year, it actually fell compared to June 2013. Looking across the individual states, population growth over the 12 months to September 2013 was greatest in Victoria 110,537 , New South Wales 108,067 , Queensland 83,737 and Western Australia 76,346 . These four states accounted for 93.4% of total population growth over the year. Annual population growth for New South Wales was at its highest level since June 2009 110,294 , in Victoria growth was at its highest level since September 2009 while in Queensland and Western Australia population growth was lower than in June 2013 88,598 and 81,327 respectively . Looking at the rate of population growth over the year, it was fastest in Western Australia 3.1% , Victoria 2.0% and Queensland and the Northern Territory both 1.8% . At 1.5%, New South Wales’ rate of population growth was at its highest level since September 2009 and in Victoria population growth was at its highest level since December 2009. While the rate of population growth is accelerating in New South Wales and Victoria it is slowing or stable across all other states. Most notably, the rate of population growth in Queensland is at its slowest pace since September 2011 and in Western Australia it is at its slowest pace since December 2011. The Australian Capital Territory has also been recording strong population growth recently however, the 1.6% growth over the past year is the slowest rate of growth since December 2006. The data indicates that population growth is escalating into the two most populous states, New South Wales and Victoria, which, perhaps not so incidentally, are also showing the strongest housing market conditions. In each other state and territory the rate of population growth is generally waning. Overseas migration may have also peaked which is no surprise given that the mining investment peak may have already or is expected to shortly pass. We believe that population growth will remain at high levels on an historic basis however, it would not surprise us to see the rate of growth slow further over the coming quarters.

Week ending 30 March, 2014

This week RP Data is expecting 1,320 auctions in Melbourne. This weekend last year was during Easter so does not provide a useful comparison. This is the third week in a row with over 1,000 auctions and that is unprecedented in Melbourne. The highest volume of auctions is in Reservoir with 26 followed by St Kilda with 23 and Armadale with 21. All current indicators show signs of a market that is picking up strength with volumes increasing, days on market is falling and vendor discounting reducing. Over the last week the measure of days on market for a house to sell at private sale has dropped from 37 to 35 days in Melbourne. Strengthening demand also leads to vendors at private sale discounting from their advertised price to a lessor degree – this has dropped from -5.5 to -5.4 per cent over the last week. These market indicators can prove to be volatile on a weekly basis but the trend is clear and is likely to be confirmed in increased values when the RP Data home price index is released in the next week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 23 March: 69.4 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 30 March: 1,320 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 23 March: 35 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 23 March: -5.4 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 13.1 per cent higher in month ending 23 March Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne’s highest gross rental yields by distance from the city

Investors are always seeking locations and property types that can deliver the highest returns on their investment. In this analysis RP Data highlights some interesting outcomes in Melbourne. Those suburbs within a 10kms radius of the Melbourne CBD with the highest yield for houses were Brunswick East and St Kilda East. Both suburbs returned a gross rental yield of 4 per cent. This compares favourably to the citywide yield for houses of 3.4 per cent in February. In the middle ring of suburbs, from 10 to 20kms from the CBD the highest yields were recorded in Dallas of 5.6 per cent. In the outer suburbs Melton South recorded a yield of 5.6 per cent. It is interesting to note that similar yields are available in the middle and outer suburbs and they are much higher than is found in the inner city. Investors looking for yield are really faced with a choice between the inner city and the rest of Melbourne. There is much greater disparity in the unit market. The highest yield within 10kms of the CBD was in the suburb of Melbourne at 5.8 per cent. In the middle suburbs Macleod was well ahead of all others at 7.3 per cent. In the outer suburbs Melton recorded the highest yield of 6.3 per cent. The rule of thumb for investors in the detached houses segment does not hold in the unit market where higher yields can be found in a wider diversity of locations. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

a wrap of the weekend auction markets: Week ending 23 March 2014

National auction clearance rates recorded above the 70 per cent mark for the sixth week in a row. Over the week, auction volumes remained relatively steady, with 2,431 capital city properties taken to auction, increasing only slightly from 2,293 the previous week. Meanwhile, the weighted auction clearance rate across the combined capital cities improved slightly over the week, up from 70.8 per cent the week prior to 71.2 per cent last week. Unlike the previous week, the performance across Melbourne and Sydney was more aligned last week, with both cities recording a strong clearance rate. At the same time last year, auction volumes were at elevated levels as it was the week prior to the Easter long weekend. Traditionally, the number of auctions that take place over this week each year increases by around 25 per cent when compared to the week prior, last year however, volumes increased by over 40 per cent leading up to the Easter weekend. Despite the high volume of auctions held the week before Easter last year 2,649 , the auction clearance rate was recorded at 64.1 per cent, which is much lower than we are currently seeing. There were 963 residential Sydney properties taken to auction over the week and the preliminary auction clearance rate was recorded at 77.9 per cent, compared to a 79.8 per cent clearance rate across 868 auctions over the previous week. When we look at the Sydney auction market at the same time last year, auction volumes were lower 912 and a lower proportion of homes were selling successfully under auction conditions 68.6 per cent . These results highlight just how strong current conditions are across the city. In line with the strong auction performance, Sydney home values over the past year have increased by 14.9 per cent, reinstating the strong performance of the Sydney housing market. Across Melbourne, a preliminary clearance rate of 71.7 per cent was recorded last week from 895 auction results compared to 67.0 per cent recorded both last weekend and this time last year. At the same time last year, there were slightly more auctions held across Melbourne 1,294 compared to the 1,149 held this week, and a marginally lower clearance rate. Currently, Melbourne home values are 12.2 per cent higher than they were at the same time last year and with one week to go this month, early indications show Melbourne home values are on track to record solid growth through March despite the increasing levels of homes on offer for sale. Because Brisbane is a much smaller auction market than both Melbourne and Sydney, auction clearance rates across the city have the tendency to vary substantially from week to week. Last week, Brisbane’s preliminary auction clearance rate was recorded at 37.3 per cent, down from 54.5 per cent the week prior. Last week, 127 residential properties were taken to auction across the city, compared to 138 over the previous week. Brisbane auction volumes are set to jump substantially over the coming week, with 214 properties across Brisbane set to go under the hammer, so it will be interesting to see if auction clearance rates improve over the coming week. Compared to the previous week, Adelaide’s clearance rate was recorded at a much lower level, with the preliminary clearance rate for the city coming in at 59.3 per cent, compared to a final clearance rate of 70.0 per cent over the preceding week. The number of auctions that took place across the city also dropped over the week, from 95 the week prior to 80 last week. While this is the lowest clearance rate recorded across the city so far this year, at the same time last year, the auction clearance rate 53.3 per cent was lower, while there were more auctions held across the capital 110 . Auction markets across the remaining capital cities Perth, Hobart, Canberra and Darwin tend to be very small with only a small number of auctions held each week. Last week we saw 30 auctions across Perth with a clearance rate of 57.1 per cent, 25 auctions across Hobart with a clearance rate of 54.5 per cent and 57 auctions in Canberra with a clearance rate of 53.3 per cent. There were only three auctions recorded in Darwin last week, with no successful results. Currently, RP Data is tracking 2,845 capital city properties that are scheduled to be taken to auction over the coming week, making this the busiest week for auctions so far this year. *Melbourne auction commentary provided by Robert Larocca, RP Data’s Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Fewer homes selling at a loss as dwelling values continue to rise

RP Data has today released our latest Pain & Gain Report for the December 2013 quarter. The report found that of those residential properties re-sold throughout the final quarter of 2013, 9.7% were sold for less than their previous purchase price compared to 31.8% of re-sold homes transacting for more than double their previous purchase price. The proportion of loss making sales was down from 12.6% at the same time in 2012 and was at its lowest level since the three months to July 2011. Across the combined capital cities the proportion of loss making re-sales was even lower. Over the quarter, just 6.5% of homes sold at a loss compared to 9.8% at the same time in 2012. The proportion of loss making re-sales was at its lowest level since the three months to May 2011. Across each individual capital city, the proportion of homes selling at a loss is now trending lower. Given the consistently low mortgage rate environment and the rise in home values over the past year this is not an unexpected occurrence. With values rising and as we move beyond the financial crisis, the likelihood of homes re-selling at a loss is likely to continue to reduce throughout 2013. A key feature of the Pain and Gain analysis over recent years has been the consistently high proportion of loss making re-sales across some of the most high profile coastal markets. Conversely, key regions linked to the resources sector have consistently recorded a relatively low proportion of loss making sales. More recently conditions have started to change. High profile coastal markets such as Richmond-Tweed in New South Wales, as well as Far North, Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast in Queensland and the South West region of Western Australia have generally seen a high proportion of loss making re-sales over recent years. As the above chart highlights, the proportion of loss-making re-sales is now trending lower across each region. At the end of the December 2013 quarter, 23.8% of re-sales in Richmond-Tweed were at a loss down from a peak of 29.1% over the three months to October 2012. Across the Queensland regions, the proportion of loss making re-sales peaked at 41.7% in the Far North Jun-12 , 39.1% on the Gold Coast Dec-12 and 35.7% on the Sunshine Coast Dec-12 . At the end of last year, the proportion of loss-making re-sales were recorded at: 28.8% in the Far North, 26.9% on the Gold Coast and 25.8% on the Sunshine Coast. South West Western Australia recorded a peak in loss making re-sales of 23.3% in May-12 and at the end of 2013 the proportion had fallen to 19.6%. As the high profile coastal markets have started to show improving market conditions, resource areas have seen property values and demand begin to fall resulting in a lift in the proportion of loss making resales. The above chart highlights the proportion of loss making re-sales over time across the major mining regions of Fitzroy and Mackay in Queensland and the Pilbara and South Eastern in Western Australia. In Fitzroy, the proportion loss-making re-sales have risen from 9.5% at the end of 2012 to 19.5% at the end of 2013. At the end of 2012, 10.4% of Mackay homes re-sold transacted at a loss compared to a much higher 23.6% at the end of the December 2013 quarter. The Pilbara region recorded 13.3% of all re-sales at a loss over the final quarter of 2013 up from 2.0% a year earlier. 18.1% of re-sold homes in the South Eastern region transacted for less than their previous purchase price over the final three months of 2013, up from 11.8% over the same period in 2012. The impact of the peak in mining investment on local housing markets is clearly the primary cause of the upswing in realised loss. With demand for mine workers lower in the operation phase compared to the construction phase, local housing markets are often experiencing falling demand both from a rental and an ownership perspective. As a result it is no surprise that a greater proportion of sellers are realising a loss on the sale of their home in these areas. The analysis suggests that low mortgage rates are resulting in housing market conditions that are generally improving. Across the country the proportion of loss making re-sales is trending lower as home values rise. Coastal markets have seen a relatively high proportion of loss making re-sales and although, as a proportion, loss making sales remain high they are also trending lower. This reflects the low levels of capital growth returning to these markets. On the other hand the slowdown in mining investment is already having an impact on regions heavily linked to the resources sector. The economies in these areas tend to not be overly diversified and it would be no surprise to see a further rise in the proportion of loss making re-sales in these areas throughout 2014.

Week ending 23 March, 2014

Auction volumes remain strong this week with 1,076 expected in Melbourne and 1,154 across Victoria. This is the first time there has been consecutive weekends with over 1,000 auctions in March. The healthy demand that is present in the auction market is also apparent in the private sales market. Days on market for houses in Melbourne dropped again this week to 37 from 42 last week. This is consistent with last year’s trend which saw days on market contract from the mid 40’s to 39 in December. Vendor discounting also dropped again to -5.5 per cent last week. Time on market and vendor discounting metrics are important as they provide a measure of demand in the private sale market. Buyers will find increased choice over the next few weeks as the listings being prepared for sale were 10 per cent higher in seasonally adjusted terms compared to last year. As this is common to both private and auction property market segments, it will provide a greater test for the market than a weekend of 1,000 auctions. The highest volume of auctions is in Reservoir where 26 are listed followed by 23 in Brighton and 20 in Richmond. Key data Clearance rate week ending 16 March: 67 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 23 March: 1,076 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 16 March: 37 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 16 March: -5.5 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 10 per cent higher in month ending 16 March Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Over $10 Million spent on real estate every day in Boroondara during 2013

It takes a few months after the end of the calendar year for a vast majority of property transactions to settle and be finalised. With final numbers for 2013 now available, a comparison with previous years can now be undertaken. In 2013 there were 81,590 residential sales in Melbourne and 107,845 in Victoria. Looking at the Melbourne market over the medium term this is a comparatively low level of sales. Since the year 2000, nine years have seen a higher level of sales with a peak in 2007 with 105,194 sales. Thankfully, a combination of more confident consumers and record low interest rates has been the catalyst for the level of sales in 2013 rising above the two preceding years of 77,867, and 73,459 respectively. It is important to note that the volume of transactions has a direct impact on the health of the Victorian Government budget as a significant portion of its income is derived from stamp duty as well as the industries that supply and support the housing sector, real estate, building and ancillary services. On a more local basis, the highest number of sales took place in the city’s growth areas with the highest levels of the spending taking place in the inner east. Across the state’s municipalities, the highest number of total transactions took place in Casey where 4,130 sales were recorded equating to around 11 sales every day. Similar numbers were recorded in the Mornington Peninsula with inner city locations, Melbourne and Boroondara following. The largest volume of sales in financial terms was recorded in Boroondara where $3.97B was spent on residential real estate, or just over $10M every day. At the other end of the scale, Nillumbik recorded the lowest number of sales, at 946 and the lowest in financial terms at $507M. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

a wrap of the weekend auction markets: Week ending 16 March 2014

Auction volumes bounce back, but performance is varied across the major auction markets. After a quiet week for auctions the previous week, auction volumes across each capital city market increased last week with 2,289 auctions held across the combined capital cities, compared to just 1,520 over the previous week. Last week, the preliminary auction clearance rate increased to 72.4 per cent, from 70.2 per cent the previous week, meaning that current auction clearance rates remain much stronger than they were one year ago 64.4 per cent . While overall, clearance rates increased over the week, it is interesting to note that across Australia’s two largest auction markets, Melbourne and Sydney, there was more than a 10 percentage point difference between the weekly results. Last week, Sydney’s preliminary auction clearance rate was recorded at 82.7 per cent, the second strongest result for the year so far. There were 857 Sydney properties taken to auction last week, with volumes remaining virtually unchanged when compared to the previous week when there were 859 Sydney auctions, but a lower clearance rate of 78.8 per cent. Currently, Sydney’s auction market continues to track at a much higher level when compared to one year ago. Over the same week last year, 650 Sydney properties were taken to auction with 70.4 per cent clearing. In Melbourne, the preliminary clearance rate of 67.9 per cent was recorded this weekend from 885 auctions compared to 67.3 per cent last weekend and 66.4 per cent this time last year. Listing volumes are now surging in both private and auction sale segments with 11 per cent more new residential listings over the last month compared to this time last year. Prospective vendors are clearly being encouraged by market activity in the first quarter of the year. If this listing activity is matched by sales over the rest of the year we are likely to reach a level of transactions that both exceeds last year and the average over the previous decade. Final numbers for last year saw 81,590 sales in Melbourne. This was 11 per cent higher than 2012 but 5 per cent lower than the average over the previous decade. Brisbane recorded a much stronger preliminary clearance rate last week 56.2 per cent when compared to the previous week 45.0 per cent , however auction volumes have remained steady over the two week period, with 139 auctions held in the city last week, compared to 138 the previous week. Over the same week last year, 37.5 per cent of the 109 Brisbane properties taken to auction recorded a successful result. Both auction clearance rates and the number of properties taken to auction in Adelaide increased last week, when the preliminary auction clearance rate was recorded at 69.6 per cent, compared to 63.2 per cent over the previous week and there were 94 auctions held in the city, up from 80 auctions the week prior. So far this year, there has only been one week where Adelaide’s auction clearance rate has fallen below the 60 per cent mark, while one year ago, just 48.7 per cent of the 82 properties taken to auction sold. The number of auctions expected to be held across the capital cities this week will remain fairly steady, with RP Data currently tracking 2,297 auctions for the week. *Melbourne auction commentary provided by Robert Larocca, RP Data’s Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 16 March, 2014

Auction volumes continue to exceed this time last year with 1035 expected in Melbourne this week. This weekend last year saw 929 auctions held. The healthy results recorded last year and again this year is encouraging more vendors into the market as they are confident of a good sale outcome. This trend of increasing listings is confirmed by the most recent data that shows that over the past month listings being prepared for sale are now higher by 9 per cent, the number of active new listings is 2 per cent higher and auction volumes are also at record levels. Vendors at private sale are now seeing a tightening of market conditions with selling days down to 42, and vendor discounting at -5.6 per cent. The highest volume of auctions this week is in Reservoir and St Kilda, each of which has 19 listed. Key data Clearance rate week ending 9 March: 67.3 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 16 March: 1035 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 9 March: 42 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 9 March: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 9 per cent higher in month ending 9 March Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 16 March, 2014

Auction volumes continue to exceed this time last year with 1035 expected in Melbourne this week. This weekend last year saw 929 auctions held. The healthy results recorded last year and again this year is encouraging more vendors into the market as they are confident of a good sale outcome. This trend of increasing listings is confirmed by the most recent data that shows that over the past month listings being prepared for sale are now higher by 9 per cent, the number of active new listings is 2 per cent higher and auction volumes are also at record levels. Vendors at private sale are now seeing a tightening of market conditions with selling days down to 42, and vendor discounting at -5.6 per cent. The highest volume of auctions this week is in Reservoir and St Kilda, each of which has 19 listed. Key data Clearance rate week ending 9 March: 67.3 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 16 March: 1035 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 9 March: 42 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 9 March: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 9 per cent higher in month ending 9 March Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Lower consumer confidence will dampen the housing market

The latest consumer sentiment data arrived yesterday from Westpac and the Melbourne Institute. The reading of consumer confidence fell for the fourth consecutive month and moved below the 100 mark where optimists and pessimists are equally balanced. With a reading of 99.5, the index is virtually at a neutral setting but more than 10 index points below the recent peak of 110.6 recorded in September last year. The index moves around a lot from month to month, so the trend is generally more important than the monthly reading, however we have seen the index move lower over five of the past six months which indicates a softening consumer mind set. Consumer confidence and housing market conditions are highly correlated. No surprises there… if a consumer is lacking confidence in their household finances they aren’t going to be as prepared to make a high commitment decision such as purchasing a property. If the consumer confidence index continues to trend around the 100 mark or lower we can probably expect the exuberant housing market conditions to taper off, despite the low interest rate environment. The two graphs below demonstrate the correlation; when consumers are confident market demand rises, pushing values higher and vice versa. Even though confidence levels have eased, consumers are still viewing the housing market as a ‘wise’ place for their savings. One of the questions asked in the Consumer Sentiment survey is ‘where is the wisest place for savings’. Just over a quarter of respondents think that real estate is the wisest place for savings, the second most popular option after ‘financial institution’ 33.9% . There are a few factors that are likely denting confidence at the moment. The early declines in the index were potentially a natural comedown after the post-election improvement, however more recently the lower level of sentiment is probably more attributable to the weaker jobs market. The unemployment rate is rising, hitting its highest level since 2003 in January at 6.0%. The pain in the automotive sector is likely causing further discomfort, as are other high profile job shedding situations such as Qantas. As demonstrated by the Westpac-Melbourne Institute Index of Unemployment expectations, consumers haven’t been this worried about job security since the depths of the GFC. Consumer confidence can be fickle, and we may see the consumer mind set bounce back to a more optimistic position if the jobless rate stabilises and economic data flows improve, but if the current levels of low confidence persist it may be the case the housing transaction numbers start to trend lower as consumers batten down the hatches.

Two million is the new one million

The luxury or prestige segment of the residential market is better defined by sales over $2 million as opposed to the old measure of $1 million, after all that covers nine per cent of all sales in Melbourne. Analysis of the sales in Melbourne over the past three years shows the prestige market has not recovered to 2010 levels yet. In the 12 months ending in November 2010 there were 1,436 dwelling sales for $2 million or more and this represented 1.54 per cent of all sales. Looking separately at the sales of units and houses there were 34 suburbs that recorded ten or more sales for $2 million or more. Of those four saw ten or more of both units and houses, they were East Melbourne, Brighton, Toorak and South Yarra. The highest volume of individual sales was in Brighton with 131 compared to 122 in Toorak and 93 in Kew. Over the same period in 2012 the overall number had plummeted to 1,046. This will have been in part due to the price falls recorded over the two years from the peak to the trough and it will also have been due to the overall reduced number of transactions. Even accounting for the lower volume the proportion of sales was down to 1.44 per cent. The number of suburbs with ten sales $2 million or more dropped to 26. Last year values rose in the overall market by 8.5 per cent but the prestige segment did not record similar growth. There were fewer suburbs with more than ten $2 million dollar sales with only 23 meeting that measure and whilst the total number of sales rose to 1161 it was only 1.43 per cent of the market. The top 3 suburbs for prestige sales were the same as in 2010 but the volumes lower with 122 in Brighton, 81 in Toorak and 68 in Kew. In the unit market there are currently three suburbs that have recorded ten or more $2 million sales over the past 12 months, Docklands which had 16 sales, Toorak also recorded 16 and South Yarra recorded 13. This shows that in the unit and apartment market the newer suburbs of Docklands, South Yarra and Southbank are attracting buyers who could choose to live almost anywhere they wanted to in Melbourne. These choices underscore the desirability of these inner city locations. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

a wrap of the weekend auction markets – Week ending 9 March 2014

Public holidays drive down auction volumes, while Sydney’s preliminary auction clearance rate breaks the 80 per cent mark for the third time this year. RP Data recorded a preliminary auction clearance rate of 70.4 per cent this week, with 1,506 auctions held across the capital cities. Auction volumes are down substantially when compared to the previous week, when there were 2,712 capital city auctions, with public holidays being held on Monday in Victoria, South Australia, the Australian Capital Territory and Tasmania. Over the previous week, the final auction clearance rate was recorded at 74.2 per cent, revised up slightly from the preliminary figures released earlier in the week. Over the same week last year, there were 996 capital city properties taken to auction with a clearance rate of 61.6 per cent. Since August last year, Sydney has consistently been recording the strongest clearance rate of all Australian capital cities. This week was no different, with a preliminary clearance rate of 80.2 per cent and 844 auctions held in the city. Over the previous week, 1,035 residential properties were taken to auction with a clearance rate of 77.6 per cent. Strong auction market conditions are highlighted by the fact that over the same week last year, there were 533 Sydney auctions with a clearance rate over 10 percentage points lower than the most recent week, recorded at 67.6 per cent. On a year to date basis, auction volumes across the city are around 60 per cent higher than they were last year, meaning that with stronger clearance rates, a higher number of properties are selling successfully under auction conditions. For Melbourne, the preliminary clearance rate of 63.3 per cent was recorded this weekend compared to 76.6 per cent last weekend. The lower clearance rate does not indicate a change in market conditions as the volume was low due to the long weekend. With the first phase of the real estate year now concluded it is clear that this is the best start for the Melbourne market recorded since 2010. Property values rose in January and remained unaffected by the record auction volumes in February providing proof of the solid demand underpinning the market right now. There were 140 auctions held in Brisbane over the most recent week and the clearance rate was recorded at 49.4 per cent, increasing from 46.2 per cent over the previous week when there were 149 auctions held across the city. As shown in the below graph, Brisbane’s auction clearance rate has generally been trending upwards since early 2011. At the same time last year, there were 99 Brisbane auctions held over the week with a clearance rate of 39.0 per cent. Across Adelaide, 80 auctions were held last week and the preliminary auction clearance rate was recorded at 66.0 per cent, remaining almost unchanged from 66.2 per cent over the previous week when there were 97 auctions. In comparison, over the same week last year, 71 Adelaide properties were taken to auction and the clearance rate was 62.3 per cent. At the end of last year, Adelaide was experiencing some of the strongest clearance rates seen in the city since 2009 and 2010. This week, we expect auction volumes to increase again with 2,161 capital city auctions currently scheduled. 1,035 of these are set to take place in Melbourne, with the city clocking up another busy week of auction activity. *Melbourne auction commentary provided by Robert Larocca, RP Data’s Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Low effective supply levels likely to be a key factor in housing market conditions

Working out effective supply levels across housing markets around Australia is pretty straight forward. You just need to know how many homes are currently listed for sale as well as an understanding of the typical ‘run rate’ of sale. RP Data tracks listing numbers nationally via real estate portals and print media as well as sourcing listings data directly from many of the major real estate groups. This data is de-duplicated and counted providing a decent estimated of how many homes currently being advertised for sale we call this effective supply . We also track the number of properties that have sold nationally, ultimately acquiring 100% of property sales directly from individual state government departments. There is a lag in obtaining the full set of this data, which is why we also collect transaction data directly from the industry, which is a much quicker way to get an understanding of what is being sold prior to the official data arriving. To work out the sales ‘run rate’ or typical number of homes being transacted each month, we use a rolling three month average. To account for the lag in receiving the full complement of transaction data we have carried the sales rate forward from the December quarter last year to January and February as our best estimate of a current run rate. Dividing the number of advertised properties by the run rate of sales provides an estimate about how many months of effective supply is available within particular markets. Another way to explain this is how many months it would take for the market, at the current rate of buying, to purchase all the homes that are currently advertised for sale. Across the capital cites effective supply levels are generally very low. For detached houses, all capital cities apart from Hobart and Brisbane are showing effective supply levels that are well below 3 months. The lowest effective supply level can be found in Sydney, which not so coincidentally, has been the strongest performing capital city with values more than 18% higher over the current growth phase. Conversely, Hobart and Brisbane have seen much softer housing market conditions which can partly be attributed to the higher effective supply readings. It’s a similar scenario across the unit market where Sydney, Darwin and Perth are recording the lowest effective supply readings while Hobart stands out as having a much higher supply reading at 5.6 moths. Looking across the major regions of Australia, the effective supply trend highlights both opportunities and challenges within particular markets. From the graph below it is clear that the capital cities are generally showing the lowest effective supply levels, while key regional areas are showing comparatively high level of effective supply. The trend in effective supply levels is also important to monitor. As effective supply moves higher it suggests stock levels are outweighing market demand and vice versa. The capital city graphs below show that effective supply levels are typically moving lower across most capital cities as transaction numbers rise on high buyer demand. Some markets where effective supply levels were previously very high are showing an improvement in their dynamic. The high profile Gold Coast housing market is a good example of a region where high effective supply levels weighed down the market during the correction phases of 2008 and 20011/12 reaching almost 13 months in 2011. Effective supply levels are showing consistent improvements across the Gold Coast now with the current measure indicating about 3.8 months of effective supply. There has been a renewed trend of price growth on the back of the lower effective supply levels. The Kimberley region is a different example of a housing market where effective supply levels have shown a substantial rise, up from around 1.5 months of supply in 2009 to a recent high of just over 14 months of supply at the end of last year as the market tapers in line with the mining sector. Similar trends can be seen in other mining intensive areas such as WA’s Pilbara and Queensland’s Fitzroy and Mackay.

Week ending 9 March, 2014

There will be an appreciable drop in auctions over the weekend due to the Labour Day long weekend. RP Data is expecting 291 auctions this coming week in Melbourne. Whilst the market is going very well – the last fortnight has been remarkably strong – the missing component at this stage is first home buyers. If this sector became active again, sales volumes would rise to historical averages. Those intending to buy over the next month will welcome the largely stable nature of dwelling values over February. After the new peak was reached in January, house values dropped by 0.3 per cent in February and units rose by 0.4 per cent. This points to a market in a moderate growth phase and shows that the value rise in January has been locked in. Key data Clearance rate week ending 2 March: 76.6 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 9 March: 291 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 2 March: 56 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 2 March: -5.7 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 7.1 per cent higher in month ending 2 March Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

February auction market review, Melbourne

The Melbourne residential auction market over February was the strongest in the past five years from the perspective of listing volumes but ranked second in terms of the number of homes sold. RP Data recorded a total of 2,623 auctions over the month with a clearance rate of 71.5 per cent. Over the previous 5 years the average listings were 2,161, from a low of 1,912 in 2012 to this year’s high. Only in 2010 were more homes sold at auction. That year saw slightly fewer auctions but as the clearance rate was higher at 79 per cent, there were more homes actually sold. The comparison with 2010 will be a useful measure for the performance of the market this year as that is when the market last peaked. In nominal terms, both unit and house values are now slightly ahead of the peaks from 2010, but that still means the value eroded by inflation over 3 years has to be made up. For that to occur, the Melbourne residential market would have to see a rise of around 10 per cent in sales volumes. This is certainly present in the auction market but not yet in the private sale market. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist The February auction market Volume Sold Clearance rate 2009 1922 1344 69.9% 2010 2571 2032 79.0% 2011 2404 1444 60.0% 2012 1912 1076 56.3% 2013 1997 1343 67.3% 2014 2623 1875 71.5%

a wrap of the weekend auction markets – Week ending 2 March 2014

Auction volumes and clearance rates much higher than at the same time last year This week, a preliminary auction clearance rate of 72.8 per cent was recorded across 1,494 auction results, with a total of 2,680 auctions held across the capital cities. Both auction clearance rates and auction volumes decreased last week, from 76.2 per cent the previous week across 2,905 capital city auctions. Currently, auction conditions are a lot stronger than they were at the same time last year. Over the corresponding week last year there were 1,983 properties taken to auction within the capital cities and RP Data recorded a clearance rate of 61.0 per cent. It will be interesting to see if continuing high clearance rates encourage a further increase in the number of capital city properties taken to auction, given that current volumes are already so much higher than at the same time last year. Last week was Sydney’s second week this year where the number of auctions held in the city was more than 1,000. So far this year, Sydney’s auction clearance rate has been consistently recorded at or above 75 per cent, which is much stronger than conditions seen at the start of last year. Last week, the preliminary auction clearance rate was recorded at 77.9 per cent, with 1,019 properties taken to auction in the city. Over the previous week, there were 1,101 Sydney auctions and the final auction clearance rate was recorded at a strong 84.2 per cent, the highest auction clearance rate seen in the city since September last year. One year ago, there were only 751 Sydney auctions held over the week and the clearance rate was much lower, recorded at 61.1 per cent. The increase in the number of properties taken to auction across the city demonstrates that vendors are becoming increasingly confident of a successful sale and are more willing to market their property under auction conditions. A preliminary auction clearance rate of 73.9 per cent was reached from 1,319 auctions this week in Melbourne. This compares to 65.6 per cent for the same time last year from fewer auctions. This represents a substantial lift on the results a year ago and is a very strong result for the Melbourne market as it follows the highest volume of auctions for February on record. Last month there were 2,623 auctions with a clearance rate of 71.5 per cent. This was higher than the 2,571 recorded in 2010 although the clearance rate in February that year was 79.0 per cent. In Brisbane, less than half of all properties where RP Data recorded an auction result this week sold 42.4 per cent , however, much like the other cities, there were more auctions held in the city this week 148 compared to the same week last year 111 , when the clearance rate was recorded at a lower 37.7 per cent. Over the previous week, Brisbane’s auction clearance rate was recorded at 63.6 per cent with 161 properties taken to auction. Although conditions across the Brisbane auction market are currently much weaker than across the larger auction markets of Sydney and Melbourne, it is important to remember than unlike Sydney and Melbourne, auctions account for a much smaller proportion of the overall Brisbane market. Last week, Adelaide recorded a strong clearance rate of 75.0 per cent with 97 auctions held in the city. Over the previous week, 118 Adelaide properties were taken to auction and RP Data recorded a final auction clearance rate of 59.8 per cent. So far this year, Adelaide’s clearance rate has been recorded above the 70 per cent mark, however prior to this, the clearance rate in Adelaide had not exceeded the 70 per cent mark since back in September last year. The number of auctions held across the city over the same week last year was 70, with a clearance rate of 38.9 per cent. Auction volumes across the capital cities will be lower over the coming week due to multiple public holidays around the country. Currently, RP Data is expecting 1,402 auctions to be held across the capital city markets over the coming week. *Melbourne auction commentary provided by Robert Larocca, RP Data’s Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 2 March, 2014

Buyers will need to take last weekend’s very strong result into account at the 1228 auctions scheduled this week. A clearance rate in the mid 70’s indicates that they will face more competition when bidding for the homes at auction and this may translate into higher prices being paid. That result came after a new peak house price was recorded in January suggesting many buyers still see a lot of value in the Melbourne residential market. The February RP Data–Rismark Home Value index will be released on Monday and it will indicate if the new peak was maintained. In a continuation of the trend this year the number of homes listed for auction this week is 25 per cent higher than the 984 this time last year. It is also the highest for this weekend on record. The highest volume of auctions is in South Yarra with 21. There are 19 scheduled in Port Melbourne, Reservoir and Richmond. Key data Clearance rate week ending 23 February: 73.5 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 2 March: 1228 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 23 February: 64 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 23 February: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.5 per cent higher in month ending 23 February Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

APRA’s domestic ADIs property exposure data for the December 2013 quarter

Each quarter the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA publishes data on the exposure of Australian Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions ADI . The data is extremely useful as it provides highlights of all outstanding exposures mortgages and also some information about those written over the quarter. The data indicates that across all ADIs, 66.7% of the value of outstanding loans is to owner-occupiers with the remaining 33.3% to investors. Over time there has been little change to these proportions indicating pretty much a two thirds owner occupier to one third investor split. Looking at the type of loans mortgagees have is also interesting. At the end of 2013 a record high 34.6% of all mortgagees had a loan with an offset facility. The figure was up from 34.2% over the September 2013 quarter and 33.38% at the same time in 2013. The rising proportion of loans with an offset facility indicates to me that many mortgagees are utilising these facilities to reduce their mortgage liability whilst still having access to those funds. This is supported by recent RBA data which indicates the typical mortgagee is around 21 months ahead in their mortgage repayments. Housing finance data has told us that the level of investor lending is at its highest point since late 2003 and not far off all-time highs. Many investors choose to use interest-only mortgages mainly due to the taxation benefits they afford. The APRA data shows that a record high 35.0% of all outstanding loans are interest-only mortgages. This figure is up from 34.6% at the end of the September 2013 quarter and 33.8% in December 2012. The average amount outstanding for a residential loan was recorded at $233,500 at the end of December 2013. The figure is also a record high, up from $231,700 at the end of September 2013 and $228,300 at the end of December 2013. When you consider that at the end of 2013 the median dwelling price across the combined capital cities was $540,000, the level of debt compared to the typical home price is relatively low however, this is unlikely to be the case for more recent purchasers and those with only a small deposit we will touch on this shortly . Perhaps more concerning is the fact that the typical amount outstanding for interest-only mortgages is $295,300, up from $294,300 at the end of the previous quarter and $294,100 at the end of 2012. Those mortgagees that are not reducing their principal have much higher overall debt levels than those who are. The data also highlights some information on those residential loans written over each quarter. Over the final quarter of 2013, a record high 35.7% of new loans were for investment purposes, up from 34.4% in September 2013 and 32.8% in December 2012. It is important to remember when I say record high the data is only available from March 2008 and housing finance data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS suggests that investor activity was higher than current levels back in late 2003. Over the quarter, the proportion of interest-only mortgages hit a record high of 38.8%, up from 37.2% the previous quarter and 35.0% at the same time the previous year. Of course, the risks are that these buyers stretch themselves too far and when mortgage rates begin to be normalised they have an increased risk of default. Perhaps most intriguing out of all the data is the fact that more than one third of all loans have a loan to value ratio LVR of greater than 80%. What this means is that the mortgagee has less than a 20% deposit when purchasing and obviously these loans are inherently more risky. As a result most ADIs will require the mortgagee to pay mortgage insurance on these loans. The high proportion of loans with an LVR of more than 80% is extremely topical at the moment given that New Zealand has recently introduced macroprudential tools to their lending environment. What the Reserve Bank of New Zealand RBNZ have done is reduce the amount that NZ banks can lend to higher risk mortgages greater than 80% LVR only 10% of total lending can be for loans with an LVR of more than 80%. Over the quarter, 34.4% of all new loans had an LVR of more than 80% which was down slightly from 34.6% over the September 2013 quarter and the same proportion as in the December 2012 quarter. Although there has been a slight reduction, the proportion of higher LVR lending remains quite high. Interestingly, only 13.6% of total lending was for a LVR of more than 90% compared to 20.8% on an LBVR of between 80% and 90%. The data indicates that most new mortgages are less risky less than 80% however, the higher risk lending still accounts for a large proportion of the overall market. Overall the data provides a useful snapshot of the current lending environment. The data indicates that the prevalence of investors and subsequently interest-only mortgages within the market is rising. As we have highlighted previously, this is not without risks particularly if housing market conditions or monetary policy settings shift rapidly. Should interest rates rise rapidly in the future, the interest proportion of mortgage repayments would also quickly rise with most mortgagees on variable rate mortgages. From an investors perspective this may make ownership of an investment property less attractive and from a high LVR purchasers perspective it could make meeting the mortgage repayments more difficult. A high proportion of loans are still being written at an LVR of more than 80%. As mentioned these mortgages are typically insured so the risk to the ADI itself is lessened however it doesn’t necessarily reduce the overall market risk if we see arrears and default levels climb in the future.

Where to find a house in Melbourne for less than $400,000

Currently, Melbourne’s median house price was $610,000 based on sales in the December quarter. Naturally, this captures a lot of attention, however, it’s worth remembering that there are lot of houses that sell for a lot more affordable prices. Over the past year, just under 30 per cent of all houses in Melbourne sold for less than $400,000. The suburbs which recorded the highest of these affordable sales were in the growth areas; Pakenham, Frankston, Craigieburn Hoppers Crossing, Werribee, Sunbury and Carrum Downs. Land is less valuable in these areas due to the distance from the CBD and its availability. These factors allow developers to bring houses onto the market at more affordable prices. It is interesting to note that there are a number of suburbs within 15km radius of the CBD where more than 50 per cent of sales were below $400,000. These are: Sunshine West, Sunshine North, Broadmeadows, Ardeer and Tullamarine. Glenroy, Reservoir, Fawkner and Sunshine also has reasonable proportions of sales for under $400,000. Surprisingly, around one in ten sales are in Pascoe Vale, Box Hill and Footscray are under $400,000. While that may not be the predominate sales price, this result does show that with some dedicated house hunting it is possible to buy a house at an affordable price within 15km of the CBD. It would be rare to find a house under $400,000 and within 10km radius of the CBD. Footscray has the highest at 10 per cent. Most other suburbs within 10km of the CBD have less than 5 per cent such as Coburg where there were only 12 sales were under $400,000. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Specialist

Week ending 23 February, 2014

A preliminary auction clearance rate of 79 per cent was reached from 1147 auctions this week in Melbourne. This compares to 69.5 per cent for the same time last year when there were around 19 per cent fewer auctions. If the final result is similar to the preliminary one it will be the highest clearance rate since May 2010, a time when the market was also rising. The strong demand recorded at auctions is not yet resulting in rising dwelling values over the month but the trend of the last year has not changed. The comparison with this time last year is illustrative and provides evidence of ongoing improvement in the market. More vendors have taken the chance to sell and they have largely been rewarded with a lift in the clearance rate. It is interesting to note that the rise in auction volumes is not representative of the overall level of activity with new listings at the same level as last year and suggests an increased use of auctions. Vendor discounting was higher for houses, at -5.6 per cent compared to units at -5.3 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Where are the highest volume of homes for rent in Melbourne?

Based on rental advertisements*, the easiest place to find a rental home in Melbourne is in the inner city or inner southeast. Melbourne, St Kilda, South Yarra, Southbank and Docklands have each seen well over 1,000 units advertised for rent in the past year. The central suburb of Melbourne recorded just over 4,000. The high prevalence of medium and high-rise units for rent in the inner city is a reflection of the role investors have played in supporting the growth of these markets. It is quite remarkable to think that only twenty years ago the inner suburbs or Melbourne, Docklands and Southbank either did not exist or had very few houses for rent. It is also interesting that in those suburbs the median advertised rent is well above the median for Melbourne which was $392 per week. In the suburb of Melbourne the median rent was $450 per week, in Southbank it was $530 and $540 in Docklands. The suburb with the highest volume of houses advertised for rent was Frankston where the median advertised rent was $310 per week. This is well below the comparable number for the metropolitan area of $438. Many other suburbs with high numbers of rental houses are also affordable, excluding Richmond which is ranked 4th by number of houses for rent but has a very high median advertised rent of $580 per week. This market will be driven by the demand for houses close to the CBD. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist Data for table on blog Top 5 suburbs ranked by number of houses advertised for rent FRANKSTON PAKENHAM RESERVOIR RICHMOND POINT COOK Top 5 suburbs ranked by number of units advertised for rent MELBOURNE ST KILDA SOUTH YARRA SOUTHBANK DOCKLANDS * Rental observations are based on rental advertisements. These counts have been de-duplicated and rental advertisements are only counted when they can be physically matched to a property in our database.

Week ending 23 February, 2014

The first two weeks of auctions for the year suggest that the improvements recorded over the course of 2013 will be lasting. This will be the first weekend with more than 1,000 auctions this year. Last year there was a record 11 weekends with in excess of 1,000 auctions. The next two weeks are significant, as they will see a return to auction volumes last seen in the 4th quarter of 2013 and the next update of the RP Data Rismark Home Value Index. The index will show if the new peak house value reached in January will be affected by the rise in volumes in February. In the private sale market vendor discounting tightened from -5.6 to -5.2 per cent in the last completed week indicating that the good start to this year is not confined to the more inner and middle city auction market. Key data Clearance rate week ending 16 February: 69.2 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 23 February: 1,275 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 16 February: 67 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 16 February: -5.2 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 9.4 per cent lower in month ending 16 February Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 16 February, 2014

A preliminary auction clearance rate of 70.9 per cent was reached from 650 auctions this week in Melbourne. This compares to 64.4 per cent for the same time last year when there were around 30 per cent fewer auctions. The market is easily absorbing the increased volume of homes being offered for auction. This result suggests the upcoming weekends, each with very high numbers of auction, will see the current performance continued. There may be a higher number of auctions compared to this time a year ago but there are not a larger number of homes on the market. New listings are only -0.7 per cent lower than a year ago and the overall stock on market is -7.0 per cent lower. Significantly there are just over 11,000 more homes on offer in Melbourne than Sydney right now. Many parts of the Melbourne dominated by private sales are seeing sales campaigns as short as those for an auction with the citywide time on market for houses at 38 days. Many of the city’s quickest selling suburbs are in the outer east; Kilsyth South, Upper Ferntree Gully, Bayswater North, Tecoma, Croydon Hills, Croydon South and the Basin. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Real estate agent activity gathers pace in 2014

One of RP Data’s core services is supplying real estate agents with timely property data to assist them with undertaking comparative analysis of their local market place amongst other things , which they in turn use to determine the appropriate listing price of a property. Our services are used by approximately 70% of all real estate agencies nationally. One of the important bi-products of our market share is monitoring the level of agent activity across our data platforms. As a simple example, counting the number of Comparative Market Analysis CMA reports as well as monitoring other platform activity such as the number of logins and searches provides a unique insight around the number of homes which are likely being prepared for sale. We use this metadata to provide a lead indicator for new listings about to enter the market. RP Data’s Listing Index RLI is currently at record levels after the seasonal slump in real estate agent activity. It’s normal for the market to slow down over the last week of December and throughout most of January; the slump is typically followed by a surge in real estate agent activity as industry participants emerge from the festive period. The graph below tracks the national RLI. We recorded more than 65,000 activity events from real estate agents over the 28 days ending February 9th, which is a record number across the series which extends back to January 2009. The activity occurring across the RP Data platforms correlates well with the number of new listings entering the market over the coming weeks so we are expecting more properties to hit the market for sale as we approach the autumn season. Prospective vendors are likely to be confident considering the current housing market conditions are mostly favouring sellers rather than buyers – putting it simply, it’s a great time to be selling a property. There is some variability in the amount of activity we are seeing from region to region. Sydney’s RLI has returned to a level slightly higher than last year which is normal for this time of the season. The index was elevated over the second half of 2013 in line with the strong housing market conditions and we expect listing numbers to track at roughly the same rate as what was recorded over the past six months which has been about 7,500 new listings each month. Considering the run rate of sales across Sydney is tracking at about 8,860 per month we expect effective supply levels to remain tight across the Sydney market. In Melbourne the RLI is at record levels; the second half of 2013 saw a consistent ramp up in agent activity in line with the strong housing market conditions that were very much evident over the same period of time. The post festive season surge will settle around the first week of March, so we would expect agent activity to return to approximately the same level we were recording at the end of 2013. New listing numbers across Melbourne were tracking at around 7,800 per month compared with a run rate of sales of about 7,400 per month so we are potentially going to see an increase in total effective supply levels across Melbourne over the coming months. Brisbane agent activity is absolutely surging at the moment with the RLI for Brisbane moving about 20% higher than what was recorded during mid-December. It is likely the Brisbane housing market is right on the cusp of accelerated market activity as attention moves away from Sydney and Melbourne to Brisbane where capital gains to date have been modest, yields are substantially higher and affordability isn’t as much of a concern as the other major capitals. We have been seeing an average of about 3,900 new listings enter the market across Brisbane each month compared with a run rate of sales at 3,950 per month; so demand and effective supply levels look broadly in line currently. We anticipate there will be a ramp up in market activity over the first half of 2014 which is likely to be accompanied by an increase in new listing numbers as well. Agent activity has been on an upwards trend across Adelaide over the past twelve months, with the RLI currently at similar levels as what was recorded late last year. Confidence in the local SA economy has been dented by the weakness in the manufacturing sector, however the housing market has been slowly improving despite the weaker economic conditions. We have been tracking about 1,880 new listings being added to the local market each month compared with a sales rate of about 2,240 each month. Transaction numbers are outweighing listing numbers, keeping effective supply levels tight. Perth has seen a rise in agent activity over the first month of the New Year, however current activity levels are slightly below record levels but higher than late 2013. It’s likely that agent activity levels will settle back to around the same pace as what was recorded late last year; not quite as exuberant as what was recorded during early 2013, but still above the long term trend. The average number of new listings has been tracking at about 4,000 per month while transaction numbers are showing a run rate of 3,690 per month which indicated a growing level of effective supply overall. Agent activity across Hobart has held relatively steady over the past year after a solid increase during the second half of 2012. The local Hobart market was the only capital city where dwelling values posted a fall over the past twelve months and conditions overall remain sluggish. We have been tracking about 410 new listings being added to the market each month and about 350 home sales which suggests plenty of choice for prospective buyers and not a great deal of urgency in their purchase decision. The agent activity trend shows more volatility than other markets across Darwin, partly due to the small size of the market. Activity levels are currently well below the highs recorded back in early 2013, but similar to what was recorded in October/November last year. We are tracking about 250 new listings entering the Darwin market each month compared with a rate of sale at 289 per month, so effective supply looks relatively tight across this market. The Canberra housing market has slowed substantially over 2013, however listings activity showed a consistent increase over the last four months of 2013. The bounce back in agent activity hasn’t been as strong in 2014 which may indicate new effective supply levels are starting to ease. Over the past six months we have seen an average of 580 new listings being added to the market compared with 610 sales per month on average suggesting that effective supply additions to the market are being absorbed sufficiently.

Week ending 16 February

The Melbourne auction market continues to build this week with 719 auctions expected as part of 838 across Victoria. This represents a 30 per cent rise in volume compared to the same time last year. As volumes rise a more accurate picture of the current level of demand will emerge and allow for an assessment about the performance of the market until Anzac Day. Overall, residential transactions in Melbourne for 2013 are expected to be around 80-82,000 based on the final numbers until November. This is slightly below the average over the last five years and if first home buyers rise from their current record lows, it would boost volumes to more healthy levels. In the private sale market vendor discounting tightened from -5.7 to -5.6 per cent in the last completed week. Key data Clearance rate week ending 9 February: 67.5 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 15 February: 719 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 9 February: 66 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 9 February: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.6 per cent lower in month ending 9 February Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Tightly held million dollar suburbs

While most people are not buying homes in the city’s million dollar suburbs, if you were, which would be the easiest to purchase in? Based on the latest housing market information from RP Data, Melbourne has 45 suburbs with a median house value in excess of one million dollars. Toorak had the highest value at $2.756M and Ormond the lowest at $1.005M. Values may range between Toorak and Ormond, however, if you are a buyer it will be numerically easier to purchase in a suburb with a larger number of houses on the market. For instance the 5 million dollar suburbs with the highest number of houses on the market were; Portsea, Brighton, Toorak, Balwyn and Canterbury. In these cases between 7.2 and 6.1 per cent of houses were on the market over the 12 months ending in November. That is well above the citywide number of 5.2 per cent. At the other end of the spectrum were some very tightly held but geographically diverse suburbs; Kangaroo Ground, Caulfield, Ivanhoe, Parkville and Kew East. With between 2.3 and 3.1 per cent of houses on the market buyers had a much harder task buying. Interestingly, there is little correlation between how tightly these suburbs are held and other property data such as changes in sale prices, value or even geography. This is an interesting fact for buyers and shows that sometimes if you are fixed on a certain suburb for your home it may take a lot longer than elsewhere. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

A summary of housing finance for 2013

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released housing finance data for December 2013 earlier today. The data provides a good summary of the mortgage lending environment throughout 2013. The data shows that 2013 was clearly a year where there was a strong rebound in demand for mortgages. The total number of owner occupier housing finance commitments in December 2013 was 14.1% higher than in December 2012. This figure is split into refinances of established dwellings and non-refinances or new loans. The number of refinance commitments is 12.5% higher over the year and the number of new loan commitments is 14.8% higher. The data shows that demand for mortgages has increased measurably throughout 2013. This is also reflected in home values data, the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Index showed that capital city home values rose by 9.8% in 2013. The number of owner occupier finance commitments for the construction of new dwellings was 14.5% higher over the year, commitments for the purchase of new dwellings were 13.2% higher and non-refinanced commitments for the purchase of established dwellings were 15.1% higher over the year. It is important to note that non-refinanced purchases of established dwellings accounted for 75.8% of all owner occupier new loan commitments in December 2013. Over the 12 months of 2013 there were 598,364 total owner occupier housing finance commitment, up 9.5% from a year ago. Refinance commitments accounted for 32.4% of all housing finance commitments in 2013 and the remaining 67.5% was for new loan commitments. In December 2013, the total value of housing finance commitments the amount borrowed was $27 billion. From a banking perspective, the money lent is much more important than the number of loans and the total value of finance commitments was 27.0% higher over the year. Looking at the value of commitments, commitments to owner occupiers for refinances were 20.4% higher year-on-year, owner occupier new loan ex-refi commitments were 19.0% higher while investment loan commitments increased by 40.7%. The total value of housing finance commitments, excluding refinanced loans increased by 28.5% year-on-year. Looking at the proportion of housing finance commitments provides further insight into how much is being lent to different cohorts of the market. As a whole, 60.2% of lending over the month was to owner occupiers made up of 43.4% for new loan commitments and 16.8% for refinances. The rest 39.8% was lending for investment purposes. The 43.4% of lending to owner occupiers for new loans was the lowest proportion since January 2004. The 16.8% of lending for refinances by owner occupiers was the lowest proportion for that segment since September 2010. The 39.8% of lending for investment purposes was the greatest since October 2003 41.2% . The 41.2% of total lending for investment in October 2013 was also the highest proportion of investment lending on record. In my opinion the level of investment lending is a concern from the market given it is currently at near record levels. Obviously with mortgage rates low and returns on relatively risk-free asset classes so low investors are moving into other, slightly more risky asset classes such as residential property. This is what the RBA was hoping for however, the high level of lending to investors is not without potential risks in the future. The move to residential property investment seems to be purely a move chasing capital growth. In strong investment driven markets such as Sydney and Melbourne home values increased by 14.5% and 8.5% respectively in 2013. Gross rental returns on residential property in these cities is extremely low at 4.0% and 3.5% respectively at the end of last year. If these investors are not necessarily committed to the housing market long-term then we could potentially see an influx of investment-grade properties come to the market in the future as these investors look to exit the housing market and place their investment dollars elsewhere. Despite the fact that we have near record low mortgage rates and home values had been falling through 2011 and the early part of 2012 the level of activity by first home buyers has been extremely low. In December 2013, the number of first home buyer finance commitments was actually 1.9% higher than the previous December note these figures are not seasonally adjusted . Throughout 2013 there were 82,599 first home buyer housing finance commitments indicating that they accounted for just 13.8% of all owner occupier finance commitments over the year. The number of first home buyer finance commitments in 2013 was a record low for a calendar year period. Overall the data highlights that 2013 was a strong year for mortgage lenders with escalating demand for mortgages. The increase in demand has largely been driven by subsequent purchasers upgraders or downgraders and investors. The rising level of demand for mortgages has subsequently resulted in an increase in property sales and fuelled the 9.8% annual increase in capital city home values. As noted the heightened level of activity by investors in the market is potentially a cause for concern and no doubt one that the RBA and APRA will be keeping a close eye on. Keep in mind that in many instances investors are using interest-only loans these are obviously attractive when interest rates are at record low levels but potentially not as attractive when/if interest rates are normalised. With mortgage rates still at low levels and the market expectation that there will be no increase in the cash rate until 2015 it is difficult to see how there won’t be a further lift in housing finance commitments throughout 2014. It will be interesting to see if we see a further lift in investment activity in the market and whether or not we see a rebound in first home buyer volumes throughout the year.

Week ending 9 February 2014

A preliminary auction clearance rate of 68.8 per cent was reached from 285 auctions this week in Melbourne. This compares to 65.7 per cent for the same time last year. Base on this week’s result, the auction market has picked up from where it ended last year. Volumes are still low and the clearance rate may change as the number of auctions build over the next few weeks. Buyers face slightly less choice than this time last year with fewer homes on the market. There are 7.6 per cent fewer total listings in Melbourne than a year ago which is a reflection of the faster selling times. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 8 February

This is the first week for 2014 in which there will be sufficient auctions to allow for a clearance rate to be calculated with 309 auctions scheduled. After a hiatus over January listings have begun to rise strongly. Recent house price data showing very strong growth over January will encourage more vendors into the market as they seek to capitalise on recent market movements. Key data Final clearance rate week ending 2 February: 74.7 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 8 February: 309 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 2 February: 62 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 2 February: -5.7 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 18.7 per cent higher in month ending 2 February Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The average time on market hits record low levels and vendor discounting reduces significantly in 2013

RP Data has been tracking the average number of days properties take to sell and the average vendor discount since the beginning of 2005. Both measures have recorded a significant improvement throughout 2013 and the average number of days on the market is currently at a historically low level. Average vendor discount excludes properties sold at auction and those which have sold above their list price and measures the difference between the first advertised price and the ultimate selling price of a home. The figure is then expressed as a percentage. As at December 2013, the average discount for a capital city house was -5.7% and for a unit it was -5.5%. At the same time in 2012, discounting levels were recorded at a much higher -6.9% for houses and -6.3% for units. The current levels of vendor discounting are the lowest they have been since early 2010 for houses and mid to late 2010 for units. An analysis of sales across the combined capital cities found that over the final quarter of 2013 29.5 per cent of all houses and 37.5 per cent of all units sold, transacted at a price which was at or higher than the original list price. These figures were greatly improved from the 25.3 per cent for houses and 30.8 per cent for units at the end of the September 2013 quarter. Although a relatively high proportion of properties are selling above the list price, the majority of homes continue to experience price negotiation and ultimately sell at a reduction from their original list price. The average time days on market figure excludes properties sold at auction and is measured by looking at the difference between the first advertised date of the property and the contract date once sold. Based on a data series from the beginning of 2005, the average days on market figures for the combined capital cities are at historic lows of 38 days for houses and 35 days for units. At the same time in 2012 the average days on market for capital city houses was recorded at 56 days and for units it was 53 days. With homes seeing lower levels of reductions to the original list price it is no wonder that we are seeing an improvement in the average number of days on market. Lower discounting levels mean that buyers and sellers are generally able to come to an agreement on price quicker. Looking at the level of discounting taking place in the market across the average time on market we see that well priced new stock is selling quickly at a very low discount level. Across house and unit sales, homes that sold in less than 30 days had an average vendor discounting level of -3.3% in December 2013. At the same time, those homes that sold between 30 and 60 days had an average discount of -4.7%, -4.9% was the average discount for homes selling between 60 and 90 days, homes sold between 90 and 120 days on the market had an average vendor discount of -7.2% and homes which sold after more than 120 days had a typical discount of -8.5%. The data highlights the importance of setting an appropriate initial list price, homes which are appropriately priced sell quickly and with a low level of discounting whereas the longer you keep the property on the market it generally results in a larger discount in order to achieve the sale. The improvement in both discounting and time on market is reflective of the broader housing market conditions. Property transactions have increased measurably over the past year and home values have also risen. These conditions are reflective of the increasing level of competition for those properties available for sale and have undoubtedly contributed to the improved discounting and time on market figures. With mortgage rates likely to remain at their current low levels over the coming months and housing market activity likely to rebound from its usual December and January slumber we would anticipate that discount levels will potentially improve further over the first half of 2014 and that the average time on market is likely to remain at current low levels. From a sellers perspective, setting an attractive initial list price will help to ensure that the selling process is a quick one and who knows, you may be one of the circa one third of the market that is selling their homes for more than their initial list price.

Significant shift in use of auctions in 2013

There was a remarkable shift in 2013 towards the use of auctions. Based on all sales until the end of November approximately 30.6 per cent of sales were by auction compared to 21 per cent in 2012. This is an interesting fact for vendors to consider as they face the choice of by what method of sale to sell their home. This is a choice best made in consultation with the real estate agent contracted to sell the home and there is some broader data that helps explain the market trends that can influence the decision. As anyone who has attended an auction will tell you they deliver the best outcome when there is competition between buyers. For that reason auctions work best when there is a unique quality of the property that can drive competition or there is a rising market. This can been seen in two sets of data. Firstly is the overall clearance rate. The clearance rate tends to rise when prices do. For instance in 2013 the house price index for Melbourne rose by 8.5 per cent and the clearance rate was 69 per cent. In 2012 the index fell by 2.9 per cent per cent with a clearance rate of 55.8 per cent. The second set of data is the proportion of sales by auction. Over the years auctions are used to sell between 20 and 30 per cent of homes in Melbourne with the balance sold by private sale. The use of auctions is far more prevalent the closer the suburb is to the CBD. It is important to note that even if you don’t sell at auction the chances are that due to the investment in the marketing you have made should will find a buyer soon after. RP Data tracks the outcome of homes passed in at auction and has found that over the months of September and October last year an additional 11 to 19 per cent sold. For example, for homes auctioned in the week ending 13 October the clearance rate was 70.2 per cent. Once the sale outcomes over the next 30 days were taken into account for those passed in it rose 11.9 points to 82.1 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne house values at new peak after nation leading growth in January

The RP Data – Rismark Home Value Index for Melbourne houses reached a new nominal peak in January after a surprisingly strong 3.7 per cent rise. The latest figures surpass the previous peak in October 2010. The unit index recorded a more moderate 0.2 per cent rise and reached an earlier peak in December 2013. Not only was a new peak reached but Melbourne recorded the strongest growth of all capital cities. Read media release here. With first home buyers at all time lows this market is being driven by upgraders and investors in the detached houses market and supported by low interest rates. With very few auctions in January the rise is also a factor of houses sold through private sale, many of which will have been passed in at auction in December. This current growth phase is being strongly supported by record low interest rates. Ongoing growth may however be moderated by lower consumer confidence in Melbourne. It should be noted that the index can show natural volatility on a monthly basis as shown by the rises in September, December and now January against a background of reductions in October and November, however the trend is clear with rises over the quarter and year. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Investors face choice between yield and capital gain

In a recent blog I looked at the relative performance of Melbourne investment property from a rental yields perspective view blog . Examining yields on a suburb basis provides an interesting metric for investors to consider; the best yields are actually found in the most affordable suburbs. Of the 10 suburbs with the highest rental yield none have a median house value of more than $350,000. Dallas and Melton South share an indicative yield of 5.7 per cent, well above the city wide yield of 3.4 per cent. The other suburbs in the top 10 are Meadow Heights, Coolaroo, Frankston North, Carrum Downs, Melton, Warburton, Hampton Park and Cranbourne West. At the other end of the spectrum the ten suburbs with the lowest yields, from 1.8 to 2.5 per cent all have median house values in excess of a million dollars, Portsea, Toorak, Balwyn, Kew, Eaglemont, Elsternwick, Canterbury, Balwyn North, Kew East and Caulfield North. It is interesting to note that while the same rule applies in the unit and apartment market there are a few notable exceptions, such as central Melbourne, which will be examined in a future post. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Are first home buyers willing to sacrifice lifestyle for housing?

Last year according to the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Index , capital city home values rose by 9.8%, creating further affordability pressures for those segments of the market who are most price sensitive; the younger aged cohorts and first time buyers. Our daily index data shows that home values have continued their strong pace of growth through the first month of 2014 with our combined capitals index likely to end the month slightly more than 1% higher. Based on homes sold over the December quarter, the median price of a house across Australia’s capital cities is now $575,000; ranging from $775,000 in Sydney through to $350,000 in Hobart. In the most expensive capital cities the challenge to buy a detached house within close proximity to where they work or socialise is simply out of reach for the vast majority of younger buyers. Housing finance data indicates that as a proportion of the owner occupier market, first home buyers are currently at a record low level, accounting for just 12.3% of all owner occupier finance commitments. If first home buyers aren’t entering the market now, at a time of historically low mortgage rates, one might consider how and when they will ever enter the market. In my opinion it is not always a case of not being able to afford to enter the market, it is often that the sacrifices a potential buyer would have to make in order to enter the market are too great. There are some clear reasons why housing in Australia is expensive, including:: Australian’s have high levels of personal wealth and high incomes relative to most other country’s Australia’s population is heavily centralised with around 55% of the national population residing in either Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth Job opportunities and employment availability tend to be most abundant within capital cities The supply of new housing within the capital cities has consistently been insufficient to meet the level of demand over the past decade or so Population growth is strong with relatively high levels of overseas migration and natural increase creating additional demand for housing The cost of vacant land has been driven to unaffordable heights due to the slow release of new residential land supply and the restrictions of urban growth boundaries in most capital cities Negative gearing which is available on all asset classes encourages many to invest in residential property as a way of reducing their tax liability which creates additional housing demand. Although these factors all contribute to a relatively high cost of housing, it does not mean that purchasing a first home is unachievable. An upcoming analysis which will be released by RP Data next month finds that as at the end of 2013, across the capital cities, 28.4% of all homes had a current value of less than $400,000. Even in a market which is considered significantly unaffordable such as Sydney, 17.5% almost one in five homes have a value below $400,000. Of course most of these properties are not located in the desirable areas of the city, but they are available. Many potential first home buyers either still live with their parents or rent within iares close to where they work and socialise. For those living with their parents, it’s likely that the home they are currently residing in was not their parents first home. I’m sure if you asked many of those parent’s they would say that their first home was vastly inferior to their current home ie they upgraded when they could afford to . For those renting in inner city areas, the reason why property prices and rents are so high in these areas is that demand is very strong while supply is quite limited which in-turn results in the high prices you see within these areas. Given this, the prospective first home buyer is, in most instances, going to have to make a sacrifice in order to enter into home ownership. As I see it, first home buyers need to make one of two major sacrifices; either move away from their local area to an area where home values are more affordable in order to enter the market or buy something which is at the lower end of the local market which will often be a unit rather than a house . The strategy for someone buying their first home should rarely be to buy at the suburbs median selling price; it should be to buy an entry level property. Of course varying levels of deposit and income will dictate what the purchaser can reasonably afford to borrow and repay. Over time, the first home buyer should see some capital growth and it would also be reasonable to expect that they should also experience an improvement in their employment conditions more pay/promotion/new role which would eventually help in assisting them to upgrade. Looking at my first home buying experience, the above scenario parallels my own experience. I have to admit, the home was pretty horrible but it was in the inner city location I wanted. My first purchase was a two bedroom, one bathroom unit in Fortitude Valley in Brisbane. The location was great but the unit was not so great. The complex was largely utilised for short term accommodation and although the unit had two bedrooms and one bathroom, outside of those three rooms it had one further room which functioned as a kitchenette, lounge and dining room. I purchased the property for $248k in July 2005 and sold the property in April 2010 for $334k effectively five years later. At the time of purchase, the median unit price within the suburb was $309,240 and by the time of sale the median unit price in the suburb was $400,000. The unit was purchased at a price well below the suburb median and upon sale the price had increased by 35%. In comparison the median sale price across Fortitude Valley had increased by a lower 29%. At the time I was single so I also had a friend come and live with me which assisted in making the mortgage repayments. By the time I sold the property I had purchased a subsequent property which was a house, once again it was purchased at a price below the suburb’s median. I had managed to make a profit on the sale of my first home and purchased a more expensive property, I had also benefitted from an increase in salary over the time which made repayments easier. In my experience the choice to purchase a first home is never an easy one. It is often the case that what you think you should be able to get for your money and what you actually can get are very different. But having an understanding of your budget and doing your research to get a realistic expectation of what properties and in what location you can afford to purchase takes some of the pain out of the house hunting process and purchasing. Undoubtedly some people will not be able or willing to purchase but bemoaning the high cost of housing in the local area is unlikely to change the situation outside of wide-spread changes to Government policy ies .

Moderate increases in rental costs over last year

Melbourne renters have seen only moderate rises in rents over the past year, especially when compared to Sydney. At the same time investors have seen static yields but potentially benefited from improved capital growth. Over the past year the median weekly rent for a house in Melbourne has risen by $10 and by $8 for units.. Currently the median rent for a house is $437 per week and $389 for a unit. This compares to a rise of $23 per week in Sydney to $582 for a house and an $18 rise for units to $509. It is certainly less expensive to rent in Melbourne than in Sydney and renters have been faced with more moderate increases. In part, the lower weekly rent explains why rental yields are lower in Melbourne than in Sydney. The yield for a house in Melbourne was 3.4 per cent in December last year and 4.2 per cent for units. In Sydney, the comparable figure was 3.9 and 4.7 per cent respectively. Over the past two years, yields have not changed substantially for houses in Melbourne with a change from 3.5 per cent 3.4 per cent recorded. Property owners over that time have benefited from capital growth. Units, which have a higher yield, have recorded a similar change, from 4.3 to 4.2 per cent. It is interesting to note that over the longer term, yields for both houses and units in Melbourne have stabilised at a lower level. From 2003 to 2005 investors benefited from yields of around 4.4 per cent for houses and 4.9 per cent for units. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne housing values rise over 2013

In the December quarter last year the median value of a house in Melbourne rose by 2.6 per cent to $542,053. Over the last year the increase was 10.7 per cent from $489,696. A similar increase was recorded for units. The median value of a unit rose by 2.3 per cent to $442,043. Over the last year the increase was 9.8 per cent from $402,440. This confirms that 2013 was a good year for real estate in Melbourne. Values rose as demand increased and more people bought and sold residential real estate. The market remains below its previous nominal peak underscoring that we are in a recovery phase. In the houses market the strongest growth in values over the year was recorded in Kew East, Balwyn North, Caulfield, Maribyrnong and Balwyn. Value growth was also recorded in the more affordable sub $500,000 segment with the highest growth occurring in Watsonia where values rose by 12.3 per cent and above the city- wide rise. The strongest growth over the quarter was concentrated in the more affordable suburbs of Hastings, Knoxfield, Mitcham, Keilor East along with Camberwell. This suggests that the substantial rise in auction volumes the more prevalent sales method in the inner city acted to moderate price growth. In the unit market the highest growth over the year was recorded in Malvern East, Balwyn, Northcote, Bentleigh East and Balwyn North. Taking a broader view of the Melbourne market the data shows that inner eastern suburbs of Balwyn and Balwyn North recorded the strongest demand across all property types. Looking forward to 2014, it is clear that the market is primed to move from a recovery to growth phase whilst economic conditions, consumer confidence and monetary policy remain favourable. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Inflation is surprisingly strong and home values adjusted for inflation are still below their previous peak

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released the Consumer Price Index results for the December 2013 quarter earlier today. The December results provide a timely summary of consumer price rises up to the end of last year. Headline inflation was recorded at 0.8% over the final quarter of the year and was 2.7% over the year. Perhaps most interesting is the fact that the final two quarters saw inflation of 1.2% and 0.8%, an annualised rate of 4.0%. The current annual inflation of 2.7% sits within the RBA’s target band of 2% to 3% however, the strong level of inflation over the past two quarters lessens the prospect of interest rate cuts for the time being. The RBA prefer to look at underlying measures of inflation; the trimmed mean and weighted median each recorded quarterly rises of 0.9% in December. Both measures have annual inflation recorded at 2.6% which is only slightly below the 2.7% headline figure. From a residential property markets perspective the effects of inflation are also important to consider. Based on the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Index, combined capital city home values increased by 9.8% in 2013 however, when you adjust for inflation the growth was a lower 6.9%. Although home values rose over the year across all capital cities, when the impact of inflation is considered, home values actually fell in Hobart -0.6% and the rate of growth across all other cities was also lower. Over time the impact of inflation on housing markets should also be considered. The raw capital growth figures show that combined capital city home values at the end of 2013 were 3.5% higher than at their previous peak. When these figures are adjusted for inflation, values are still -4.6% lower than their previous peak at the end of the September quarter in 2010. Across each individual capital city market, inflation adjusted home values remain below their previous peak. This includes Sydney and Perth where unadjusted figures show values are 10.9% and 3.6% higher than their previous peak respectively. When adjusted for inflation, values across these two cities are currently -0.1% lower than their previous peak and Perth values are -8.9% lower. If we look at the time of the previous market peak in inflation adjusted terms across each city, it goes some way to explaining why there has been such a pick-up in demand for housing and subsequently an increase in home values. Sydney’s market peaked in the first quarter of 2004 and across other capital cities the market peaks were: Melbourne Q3 2010 , Brisbane Q1 2008 , Adelaide Q2 2010 , Perth Q3 2007 , Hobart Q4 2007 , Darwin Q3 2010 and Canberra Q2 2010 . With the relative costs of other goods rising at a faster pace than home values over recent years it is no surprise with mortgage rates at historic low levels that buyer demand and home values have now been rising. From here, if inflation continues to climb that may result in the need to lift interest rates which would likely dampen investor activity and slow levels of capital growth. The important thing to keep in mind however is that when you consider inflation, dwelling values remain lower than their previous peaks in every city.

Very few sellers in Knox record a loss

The latest version of RP Data’s Pain and Gain report showed that as we get closer to a new peak in dwelling values the proportion of sellers making a profit on sale is increasing. Interestingly some of the best outcomes have been recorded in suburbs around 20 km away from the Melbourne CBD. The report is useful for property investors, small or large, because it looks only at homes that already have an owner and whose sale price is therefore set by the market. Other market data, median prices for instance, mingles the new sales with prices set by the developers and those sold by individuals. The report showed that only 7.7 per cent of Melbourne homes re-sold in the September quarter of 2013 incurred a loss for their owners. This was lower than the 8.2 per cent recorded in the June quarter this year and 8.3 per cent in the 2011 June quarter. Of course the longer the home was owned the more likely the owner was to see a profit on sale. The highest proportion of owners selling for more than double what they paid had owned their homes for between 10 and 15 years. In overall terms the highest overall profit was recorded in more expensive areas with sellers in Boroondara recording $231M in profit in three months. Whitehorse ranked second with $159M in profit and Monash third with $136M. Despite the very high profits recorded in those inner and middle eastern municipalities it was sellers in Knox that probably had the best outcome with only 2 per cent recording a loss. Those losses totalled only $360,000, less than the value of one house. Second on the list was Manningham where 3.9 per cent of sellers recorded a loss and third was Maroondah with 4.3 per cent. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Where have the Victorian first home buyers gone?

One of the most perplexing market trends right now is the substantial drop in first home buyers in Victoria. According to ABS Housing Finance data, only 12.2 per cent of loans were given to first home buyers in November 2013. This compares to a 20 year average of 21.4 per cent and follows October which recorded the lowest proportion of first home buyers in 20 years. From a raw numbers perspective, the last time there were fewer than 1,691 of first home buyers recorded in November was in 1991. It is now 16 consecutive months that the proportion has been lower than the long-term average. The proportion rose in November but only because the number of non-first home buyers fell to a greater extent. The reason this a perplexing issue is because Melbourne dwelling prices are still not at a nominal peak and interest rates are at historical lows. When prices last peaked in October 2010 around 18 per cent of loans were given to first home buyers. At the peak of cycle before that, in 2007, it was around 21 per cent. Prices alone cannot be the reason. One factor may be the cessation of the Victorian Government’s $7,000 First Home Buyers Grant as the proportion dropped 4 points from July to August and has not risen since. It would however be surprising if this alone was the reason as financial assistance is still available for new homes and stamp duty cuts of 40 per cent can still be accessed. The data also supports the argument that first home buyers are being crowed out by investors. Even if this is the case, it is not a healthy outcome for the market as investors are critical to the supply of rental homes. It will be very interesting to watch what impact the increasing stamp duty cuts have over the next ten months as the current 40 per cent discount rises to 50 per cent, hopefully it will encourage more Victorian first home buyers back into the market. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Housing finance data shows demand for mortgages continues to climb

Housing finance data for November 2013 was released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics today. The data indicates that the strong demand for housing finance continued in November however, first home buyer activity slumped to new record lows as they continue to be squeezed out of the market by subsequent purchasers and investors. According to the data, the total number of commitments increased by 1.1% over the month and is now 15.3% higher than they were a year ago. The 52,912 owner occupier commitments were the highest since October 2009. Owner occupier commitments for refinances of existing loans rose by 1.7% over the month and are 13.7% higher year-on-year. In comparison, non-refinance commitments increased by 0.9% in November and are 16.1% higher than they were in November 2012. Year on-year, non-refinanced loans for the construction of new dwellings have increased by 16.9% compared to a 17.8% increase in loans for the purchase of new dwellings and a 15.7% increase in loans for established dwellings. Looking at the total value of housing finance commitments in November 2013, $26.9 billion was lent for housing over the month which was up 1.7% and 24.9% higher than in November 2012. The value of owner occupier non-refinance commitments increased by 1.9% over the month, compared to a 2.8% increase in owner occupier refinance commitments and a 1.5% increase in investment loan commitments. Year-on-year, owner occupier non-refinance commitments are 18.5% higher compared to a 20.7% increase in owner occupier refinance commitments and a 35.2% increase in investment lending. The 35.2% year-on-year increase in investment lending was the largest increase since November 2003. As a proportion of all lending in November 2013, owner occupier non-refinance lending accounted for 43.8% of borrowings, compared to 17.6% for owner occupier refinances and 38.5% for investment purposes. Although the proportion of lending for investment purposes dipped slightly in November it remains at its highest levels since December 2003. The proportion of commitments for owner occupier non-refinances is at its lowest level since March 2004. The housing finance data also provides insight into first home buyer activity. In November 2013 there were 6,887 first home buyer finance commitments which was -1.2% lower than in October but up from the recent low of 6,357 in September. The pick-up in housing finance demand is clearly stronger across the non-first home buyer market and this is highlighted by the fact that as a proportion of all owner occupier lending, first home buyers accounted for a record low 12.3 per cent in November 2013. The average size of loans has also now reached record high levels. As home values increase and median selling prices rise, home buyers need to spend and borrow more in order to mortgage a home. The average first home buyer loan size in November 2013 was $298,000, up 3.5% over the year. The average home loan size for a non-first time buyer in November 2013 was $322,200, another record high and was 3.7% higher over the year. The housing finance data highlights that there was a continuation of improving levels of demand for housing throughout November 2013. In particular, demand is strongest from subsequent purchasers and investors.

Dwelling approvals are rebounding quite nicely thank you very much!

Dwelling approvals data for November released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS earlier today showed that the Reserve Bank RBA are getting their wish. With interest rates low and mining investment topping out, the RBA were looking to the housing sector to pick up some of the slack and that is exactly what it has done. Dwelling approvals data showed that in November 2013, 16,396 approvals were granted which was a fall of -1.5% over the month however, compared to approvals in November 2012, approvals were 22.2% higher this year. Breaking the data down further, house approvals rose by 5.7% in November and are 17.4% higher year-on-year compared to an -8.8% monthly fall in unit approvals and a 28.5% increase in unit approvals year-on-year. The private sector accounts for the majority of dwelling approvals, 98.3% in November 2013. Year-on-year, private sector house approvals have increased by 18.0% and private sector unit approvals have increased by 27.6%. As you can see from the above chart, both private sector house and unit approvals are showing a clear trend towards an increasing number of approvals. The month-to-month data can be notoriously volatile however, if we look at the rolling annual number of dwelling approvals once again we can see that there is a clear trend towards a higher number of approvals. Over the 12 months to November 2013, there have been 173,869 dwellings approved for construction, of which 97.9% were approvals to the private sector. The 173,869 approvals was the highest annual number since March 2011 and were 14.5% higher than at the same time in 2012. It is also interesting to note the rising prevalence of ‘other’ or unit approvals. Looking at a rolling annual proportion, over the 12 months to November 2013, 43.7 per cent of all dwelling approvals were for units. This indicates that the majority of approvals are still granted to houses however, the 43.7% figure was the greatest proportion of unit approvals on record. It is also interesting to see just how quickly they are rising in prominence, five years ago just 32.7% of all approvals were for units and ten years ago the proportion of unit approvals was 33.0%. The sharp rise in unit approvals is most likely a response to the relatively more affordable nature of units as opposed to houses as well as a desire by many Governments to increase densities within cities, particularly within inner city areas where many residents desire to live. The above chart details the pricing differential between houses and units across Australian capital cities as at December 2013. You can see in all cities units are selling at cheaper prices than houses and in Sydney, Darwin, Melbourne and Canberra the differential is in excess of $100,000. The dwelling approvals data breaks approval types down by capital city and you can see that particularly in those cities with a large pricing differential between houses and units the proportion of units approved over the past 12 months is much greater. No doubt this is a trend which is likely to continue given urban growth boundaries and natural geographic boundaries prevalent across most capital cities. Not to mention the fact that outer suburbs may be less desirable despite generally being more affordable due to the generally poor provision of essential infrastructure in these areas. Overall the data indicates that there has been a sharp supply-side response over the past 12 to 18 months which is exactly the sort of response the RBA would have hoped to see. Over the coming months it will be interesting to see whether or not the pick-up continues. Glenn Stevens famously states that the RBA wanted a supply-side response to low interest rates not just higher home prices, at the moment they are getting both. Over the 12 months to November dwelling approvals have increased by 22.2% however over the 12 months to December 2013 home values have increased by 9.8% according to the RP Data-Rismark Home Value Index. From here it will be interesting to see how strong home values growth is in 2014 and if it starts to slow what, if any, impact will it have in the current pick-up in dwelling approvals.

Housing demand increases to highest level since September 2009

Data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS earlier this week showed that the national population increased by 407,027 persons over the 12 months to June 2013 to reach an estimated 23,130,931 persons. The increase in new residents equates to a growth rate of 1.79% over the year making it the greatest annual increase in raw number terms since September 2009 and the most rapid rate of population growth since December 2009. Looking at the components of national population growth, 40% of the increase over the year has come from ‘natural increase’ ie births minus deaths 162,656 and 60% from net overseas migration 244,371 . Over the year, the rate of natural increase has risen by 2.4% compared to an 8.6% increase in the rate of net overseas migration. The high rate of net overseas migration is interesting, particularly when you consider the lower rate of domestic economic growth and a forecast of unemployment to reach its highest level since late 2002 over the next year. Coupled with this, employment participation is falling, just where and what all these migrants will do for employment remains somewhat of a mystery. Breaking overseas migration down further, the data shows that there were 508,662 total migrant arrivals to Australia over the 12 months to June 2013. On the other hand, there were 264,291 residents who departed from Australia to other countries, resulting in the 244,371 net migration figure over the year. This indicates that we have gained almost double the amount of people we have lost over the past year through migration. In comparison to a year ago, the total migrant arrivals were recorded at 478,763 persons and total migrant departures were recorded at 253,705 persons. Looking at the individual states, the most populous states are the major benefactors of population growth in raw number terms. The speed of population growth over the past year has been strongest in Western Australia by a long margin 3.2% which is then followed by Queensland 2.1% , Australian Capital Territory 2.0% and Victoria and the Northern Territory both 1.8% . The rate of growth only tells part of the story though, when you look at growth in raw number terms the major growth states are: Victoria 106,048 , New South Wales 102,152 , Queensland 89,862 and Western Australia 80,986 . These four states combined accounted for 93.1% of total population growth over the past 12 months. Migration is also an interesting statistic to track at the state level as it is broken down into both net overseas migration and net interstate migration. As previously mentioned, at a national level net overseas migration has ramped up over the past year. If we look across each state the story is somewhat different. New overseas migration is dominated by New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia which account for 92.2% of all net overseas migration nationally. The rate of net overseas migration has risen over the year in each state however, it has begun to fall in recent quarters within Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. Looking at net interstate migration, there has been a marked slowdown in interstate movements over recent years, most noticeable is the slowing of migration to Queensland away from New South Wales and Victoria in particular. Although the rate of migration has slowed, Queensland still had the greatest number of net interstate migrants with 9,460 over the year followed by: Western Australia 7,992 , Victoria 4,671 and the Australian Capital Territory 1,579 while all other states had a net outflow of residents to other states. Victoria actually recorded its greatest annual inflow of interstate residents since March 2002. The data indicates that the rate of population growth at a national level is strong and based on overseas arrivals and departures data it appears as if net overseas migration will continue to increase next quarter. The vast majority of population growth is taking place in the most populous states of the country and unsurprisingly much of the increase is happening in the capital cities of these states. Most overseas migrants are also choosing to settle in our most populous states. Finally, on an historic basis there seems to be much less of a propensity for residents to move interstate. The propensity has been reducing for a number of years however, ever since the onset of the financial crisis interstate migration has reduced markedly. The repercussions of these trends are that the populations of our most populous states and subsequently their most populous regions are continuing to see rising demand for homes and an increasing need for essential infrastructure. Unlike in the past, Queensland is not seeing the significant influx of residents from interstate. Given the strong growth in home values in Sydney, Melbourne and Perth over the past year and a half, it will be interesting to see if interstate migration to other states begins to rise in other states as buyers look for more affordable housing alternatives.

The numbers that matter in 2013 for the Victoria market…

As we near the year’s end there are a range of key numbers that can help explain the property market this year. This year’s results show that the residential real estate market was certainly healthier than last year, however it still remains below its peak despite being supported by record low interest rates. The high volumes of auctions were, along with moderate rises in value, a highlight but it is concerning that overall transaction volumes are still to recover substantially from 2011 and 2012. Consumers are still acting conservatively and that prevented a new peak in house values being reached this year. Sales volume In the 12 months ending September 13 there were 6 per cent more dwelling sales than the previous 12 months. At the end of 2012 there were72,432 dwelling sales in Melbourne and the comparable number in 2013 is projected to be between 76,000 and 80,000. Clearance rates Melbourne fell short of a 70 per cent clearance rate following a softer market and higher supply in the last few months. It has ended the year with a clearance rate of 69.1 per cent which is 13 points higher than last year and second only to 79.4 per cent recorded in 2009. Listings The overall number of active listings is 35,524 in Melbourne, which is only 1.3 per cent lower than a year ago, indicates that the increase in new listings has been absorbed but has failed to clear the overall backlog. Highest sales In the 12 months ending September, the highest volume of house sales were in all in growth areas, Pakenham, Berwick, Point Cook, Frankston and Craigieburn. In the unit market there were twice as many sales in Melbourne as the second on the list, Southbank. Vendor Discounting The amount that vendors of private sales need to discount from their advertised price was lower this year than a year ago at 6 per cent in October versus 7.2 per cent a year ago. For units the discounting also reduced, from 6.6 per cent to 5.8 per cent. Time on Market Vendors of houses sold at private sale achieved quicker sales at 40 days in October compared to 49 days a year ago. For units it is 38.5 days compared to 43 days a year ago. Values House values in Melbourne still remain below their previous nominal peak despite a 6 per cent rise in house values this year. The house price index in November showed values were 3.2 per cent below the peak of October 2010. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 22 December

This is the last auction weekend for 2014. I expect that after this weekend a majority of activity in the real estate market will be for private sales and the odd auction in a coastal area. By the end of this weekend Melbourne will have seen approximately 36,000 auctions compared to around 28,000 last year and 30,000 in 2011. This represents a substantial 28.5 per cent rise in volume. As evidenced in the rise in the clearance rate results, there can be no doubt that 2013 was a healthy year for auctions in Melbourne with more vendors selling their home. The clearance rate for 2013 will be 69 per cent compared to 56 per cent last year. This is the highest recorded in Melbourne since 79 per cent in 2009. There was also a rise in private sale transactions; however, it was not to the same degree. The final results available early next year will confirm this. Key data Clearance rate week ending 15 December: 64.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 22 December: 505 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 15 December: 33 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 15 December: -5.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 0.6 per cent higher in month ending 15 December Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 15 December 2013

A preliminary auction clearance rate of 66.6 per cent was reached from 1,244 auctions this week in Melbourne. This is a solid outcome after the busiest six weeks in Melbourne’s auction market history. Over this time there has been an average of 1,380 auctions each week; a record for any single week in any other year which underscores just how remarkable the spring and summer selling seasons have been. Buyers who are still in the market will find good opportunities over next month as vendors of homes passed in auction look for a buyer. Prices appear to have stabilised over the past week after the falls of November with a 0.5 per cent rise in the home value index over the last week. Time on market for houses sold by private sale remain tightened from 34 days to 33 days of the last week. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 15 December

Last weeks clearance rate of 63.3 per cent was both on trend and the lowest since April this year. The weekly clearance rate is now more than 10 points lower than the high of 76.2 per cent in late August and shows that high stock numbers are having an impact on the market. This week we expect 1757 auctions in Victoria with 1543 in Melbourne. This would make it the third largest ever after the 1619 at the end of October and 1598 at the end of November and start of December. This week will be an interesting challenge for the market in light of the trend. It is the sixth in a row above 1,000 and the last of this year’s record run of large weekends. Analysis of the last month suggests that buyers will have the upper hand. Listing of homes being prepared for market is now reducing as the year ends. The private sale market remains stable with a small increase in vendor discounting for houses but stable time on market. From value perspective the falls recorded in November have not continued over the last week suggesting that the key reason for the drop last month was related to volume. Key data Clearance rate week ending 8 December: 63.3 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 15 December: 1543 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 8 December: 34 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 8 December: -5.7 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are -1.6 per cent lower in month ending 8 December Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Is the reduction of clearance rates in Melbourne expected?

Over the course of the past two months the weekly clearance rate in Melbourne has dropped from the mid 70 range to the mid 60 range; the reasons for this are many and varied and have been discussed and debated. There is no doubt that the record volumes of homes for sale at auction have had an impact during 2013, however due to the mismatch between what individual buyers are looking for and what is on offer, there is no linear relationship between stock levels and the clearance rates. Fundamentally, high stock levels don’t cause a commensurate fall in the clearance rate. Analysis of RP Data’s auction results show that the reducing clearance rate in Melbourne in late spring and in December is a trend which has occurred in four of the past five years. In 2012 clearance rates in the high 50’s fell to the low 50’s by the end of December. In 2010 there was a very similar pattern to this year with low 60’s falling to low 50’s, and in 2009 there was a smaller fall from the low 80’s to the mid 60’s. In 2011 it was a different case as the market was at a low point with activity in the auction market very subdued and a clearance rate persistently in the very low 50’s. Further analysis suggests that from a city wide perspective the highest clearance rates in spring are found in the weeks before the September AFL Grand Final and when market activity lifts out of winter. With this in mind vendors looking to sell in the second half of 2014 should aim to do so early to allow them an opportunity to take advantage of the better buying conditions in December. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist 20092010 2011 2012 2013 September CR82.9%65.3% 51.3% 57.3% 74.4% Spring CR80%60.7% 49.6% 57.9% 70.85% December CR63.4%55.7% 50.3% 52% 63.3%* *till week ending 8 December

Investors climb to near record high levels of market participation

In last week’s RP Data Research Blog I discussed what I believe are some of the potential pitfalls of such a high level of investment activity in the housing market. The housing finance data for October 2013 was released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics earlier this week and it showed an ongoing escalation in investment activity which is a potentially worrying development and one that APRA and the RBA will have a close eye on. According to the October housing finance data, there was $10.3 billion worth of housing finance commitments for investment purposes over the month, up from $9.5 billion in September. The value of investment loans is at a record high up from its previous high in September. It is important to also keep in mind that housing finance data only looks at finance commitments to local authorised deposit-taking institutions ADIs . We hear a lot of talk about overseas investors and often that money is not sourced locally. Given this, the true amount for all investors could be much higher. The $10.3 billion of commitments to investors is still lower than the $11.6 billion worth of commitments to owner occupiers for non-refinanced loans but is also much larger than the $4.6 billion in owner occupier refinance commitments. As a proportion of the $26.5 billion in housing finance commitments over October, investment loans accounted for 38.9%. Although this amount may not sound that substantial, it was the highest proportion of investment finance commitments since December 2003 39.3% and not all that far from the record high proportion of 41.2% in October 2003. If we look back to the peak in investor activity in October 2003, the annual rate of capital growth across the combined capital cities was recorded at 17.7% at that time. From there on, the annual rate of capital growth started to decelerate. This may suggest that as investment activity peaks whenever that may be it could be a precursor to a slowdown in overall capital growth conditions. It looks as if much of the investor activity currently taking place is pure speculation on capital growth. Home values across the combined capital cities are 8.0% higher over the year which has significantly outperformed the 2.9% growth in rental rates. As the above chart shows, both the annual rate of rental growth and rental yields are falling which will result in a lower rental return. This is highlighted by the fact that we have seen capital city gross rental yields fall from 4.3% a year ago to 4.1% currently, which is not particularly attractive from an investment return perspective without the capital growth. Of course this heightened level of investment activity with little focus on rental returns is likely to result in an even greater number of negatively geared owners of investment properties. The latest data from the Australian Tax Office ATO based on the 2010-11 financial year showed that 1,811,175 individuals claimed rental income and two thirds of which claimed rental losses of $13.285 billion. With investment activity currently so high and investors seemingly focused on capital growth it seems inevitable that the number and value of losses on residential investment properties is set to increase. This heightened level of investment activity is also coming at the expense of first home buyers. Based on the number of owner occupier finance commitments, first home buyers accounted for just 12.6% of all owner occupier finance commitments in October, slightly higher than the record low of 12.5% the previous month. As the above chart shows on both a volume and percentage basis, first home buyer participation in the market is at near record low levels. We know that the trend has been towards a greater proportion of the population renting however, there must be a sense that the high level of investment activity is to some degree locking potential first home buyers out of the market. The latest housing finance data shows that first home buyers and owner occupiers who are non-first time buyers have both recently started to increase their borrowing amounts. Obviously value escalation is partly responsible however, values were rising in 2009 and 2010 without any significant lift in borrowings. The data potentially indicates that investors are driving values higher and both first home buyers and non-first home buyers have a fear of missing out and are increasing their borrowings in order to enter the market. If this trend continues it could be quite worrisome as it may lead to both increasing levels of household leverage along with increasing demand for loans with a higher loan to value ratios LVR meaning that buyers are using smaller deposits in order to enter the market. The heightened level of investment activity and the potential long-term repercussions for the housing market must surely now call for close scrutiny by both the RBA and APRA.

The very long run of the Melbourne housing market

RP Data’s median house and unit prices in Melbourne extend over nearly 40 years from 1974 till now. It clearly shows that the last decade has been the most volatile proceeded by much more moderate cycles in house prices. The first comparatively rapid rise in prices was in 1988 through to 1989 when median prices of houses rose by 42 per cent in two years. After this median prices fell and otherwise stagnated before once again reaching their previous peak eight years later in 1997. Another period of reasonably strong and rapid appreciation occurred through 2007 and into early 2008 when the median house prices rose 20 per cent. Nearly half that rise was lost in 2008 as prices fell. Unlike previous cycles there was little to no gap until the next growth phase when over 2009 and 2010 median prices rose by 37 per cent. Until the last decade sharp falls in prices where not common but they have been a recent feature of the market and are a sign of its volatility. One reason for this difference was the shock of the financial crisis, which resulted in not only confidence sharp fall in consumer confidence but also a matching boost to the market through the stimulus program. The ongoing hangover from the financial crisis, a significant fall in the rate of housing credit growth and lower levels of consumer sentiment have led to more volatile times for the housing market. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 8 December 2013

A preliminary auction clearance rate of 64.1 per cent was reached from 1,315 auctions this week in Melbourne. After an unprecedented five consecutive 1,000 plus auction weekends it is not a surprise that the clearance rate has continued to cool. Especially once you consider that the current rise in auction listings is outstripping the broader rise in transactions across the residential housing market. The high volume of auction listings is also having an impact on values with the more expensive segment of the market now recording lower levels of capital growth than the most affordable segment in contrast to the equal levels of growth over the past year. There are only two weekends for auctions left this year and buyers will continue to have the upper hand. Time on market for houses sold by private sale remain stable at 34 days compared to 34 days last week. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Value growth more moderate in current growth phase, however the potential downside risks may be greater

The current value growth phase across Australia’s combined capital cities is nowhere near as strong as other growth phases over recent times. Although home values are rising, they are doing so at a much more moderate pace than during previous growth phases. Home values are higher now than they have been in the past however, a different market characteristic now is that investors represent a much greater portion of the market. This could potentially heighten the risks associated with a downturn in the current growth phase. Nineteen months ago, the combined capital city housing market reached a low point following a -7.7% fall in home values. Since that time, capital city home values have recorded total value growth 10.3% to November 2013. In comparison, over the 19 months from the beginning of 2001 home values rose by 31.3%. From the start of 2007, home values were 13.7% higher 19 months later from the beginning of 2009 home values were 19.8% higher 19 months later. So as you can see, home value growth in this phase has been much more moderate, however, home values are also higher. Interestingly, values were still growing after 19 months in 2001/02 however, values had begun to fall by this point in 2007/08 and 2009/10. In 2007/08 the market was beginning to plunge into the financial crisis and aggressive interest rate cuts were not yet enough to stimulate higher demand and subsequent higher home values. In 2009/10 low interest rates and the First Home Owners Grant Boost FHOGB stimulated the growth in the housing market however, once the stimulus was removed and interest rates started to rise we saw the rate of value growth fall and eventually turn negative. In the current growth phase we have not as yet seen interest rates rise and there has been no other external stimulus such as the FHOGB, and values are still rising after 19 months. A feature of the market in this growth phase compared to the previous three growth phases highlighted is that a greater proportion of demand is being made up by investors; of course investors were a part of the market in the previous growth phases however, owner occupiers held greater prominence than they do currently. So is this market being fuelled purely on investment speculation? Not quite. Currently, there is a comparatively higher proportion of investment activity in the market when compared to the previous growth phases. Over the 19 months from January 2001, investors accounted for a month-to-month average of 32.2% of the value of total housing finance commitments. From January 2007 investors accounted for a month-to-month average of 34.8% of all housing finance commitments and from January 2009 they accounted for a month-to-month average of 32.7%. From May 2012 to September 2013 latest data available investors have accounted for a month-to-month average of 35.9% of all housing finance commitments. The level of investor activity throughout the current growth phase is not abnormally high but it is certainly elevated compared to the previous three growth phases analysed. Across this growth phase investment levels are not abnormally high they are escalating. In September 2013, investment finance commitments made up 37.3% of all housing finance commitments which were the highest proportion since May 2004 37.5% . As I see it there are two potential pitfall of the current heightened level of investment in this market growth phase. Firstly, data suggests that investment activity is highest within New South Wales, Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory. Anecdotal evidence suggests that off-shore investment activity is particularly strong in Victoria. If we assume that the state-wide data is a proxy for the capital city markets, we gain some valuable insight into the characteristics of investors. In Sydney, home values have already risen by 15.9% from their May 2012 low. In Melbourne home values are now 8.6% higher than their low in May 2012. Darwin values are 15.9% higher than their low in January 2012, while in Canberra, values have increased by just 3.1% from their January 2012 low. Values are still trending higher in Sydney and Melbourne. In Darwin value growth has moderated while in Canberra values are falling. My point is that if investors are chasing capital growth, in all likelihood and based on timing, they have already missed the best opportunity. If investors are focused on rental return, yields have trended lower across each of these cities over the past year. Secondly, a potential future weakness for the market is that some investors may not necessarily be ‘committed’ to the asset class. Meaning that if value growth was to slow or start to fall are these investors invested in residential property for the long haul, or will they choose to exit the asset class just as quickly as they have entered? My opinion is that if they aren’t committed then there is potential risk associated in the future where a significant supply of investment grade units may come to market when investors may be looking to exit poor performing assets. One final risk of course is a rise in the unemployment rate. Official government forecasts are calling for unemployment rates to peak at 6.25% by the middle of next year. To-date the unemployment rate has been trending higher at a fairly moderate pace and was recorded at 5.7% in October. If this rate was to rise to 6.25%, it would be the highest unemployment rate since September 2002 higher than any time during the financial crisis . If we were to see investors look to exit their investment properties such as they did in 2008 in line with an escalation in mortgage arrears, we could see weakening home values much like what occurred in 2008. Overall there are always risks associated with the housing market, or any market for that fact. We have no doubt that the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority APRA are regularly analysing these risks and liaising with the banking community to ensure these potential risks don’t turn into a reality for the market.

Week ending 8 December

Vendor confidence continues to drive record listings in the Melbourne auction market and this week features again very high listings in historical terms. This is not just confined to Melbourne, last week there were 3,400 auctions nationwide compared to 2,165 last year. In what shapes as a repeat of last weekend we are expecting 1,457 auctions this week against a background of a 2.1 per cent drop in dwelling prices over the past month. The level of supply is proving beneficial for buyers in the lead up to Christmas with improved conditions, less prevalent price growth and more choice in the auction market. Conditions continue to be stable in the private sale market, days on market for houses remain stable and vendor discounting has contracted slightly this week to -5.5 per cent. Key data Final clearance rate week ending 1 December: 67.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 8 December: 1,457 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 1 December: 34 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 1 December: -5.5 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 7 per cent lower in month ending 1 December Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Has it ever been this busy in the Melbourne auction market?

Inclusive of this weekend, over the past ten weeks we have seen around 11,400 auctions in Melbourne – this equates to an incredible average of over 1,000 auctions per week. This is more remarkable when you take into consideration that there were very few auctions on the weekend before the Melbourne Cup. A review of the auction market’s history shows that this is a first for Melbourne and it is not the only one. Other firsts for this year in the auction market include; First time with more than 1,500 auctions in one week, and First time with 10 weeks with more than 1,000 auctions in a year. RP Data’s tracking of the overall volume of sales does not show that the rise in auction listings is representative of transactions in the wider residential market. Our most recent sales data shows that for this year, there have been 7.4 per cent more residential sales in Melbourne than last year. To put this into perspective, the market is still 26 per cent down on the all-time record in 2007. This suggests that an increasing number of properties are being offered for sale by auction as opposed to private sale. In some respects this is not a surprise, the auction share of sales tends to rise in strong markets as vendors take advantage of increased competition. It does seem that this year, the shift is occurring at unprecedented levels. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 1 December 2013

A preliminary clearance rate of 69.2 per cent was reached from 1,385 auctions this week in Melbourne. Over the past four weeks the clearance rate has been below 70 per cent following record levels of supply. A review of the spring market over the past 5 years shows that this year featured the highest levels of supply and the second highest clearance rate. Prior to this weekend the spring clearance rate was 71 per cent, higher than every year since 2008 except the 80 per cent recorded in 2009. However in 2008 there were much lower levels of supply. In addition to the clearance rate and overall listing volume, another important statistic is sales volume. It shows that more homes have been sold at auction than any year since 2008. This underscores the health of the market. Time on market for houses sold by private sale remain stable at 34 days compared to 34 days last week. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 1 December

With just one month to go until the end of 2013, the auction market has started to show the impact of the record run of weekends of over 1,000 auctions. This coming weekend represents the 8th this year, which is double the 4 over the whole of 2012. Interestingly the last time there were 4 successive weeks with over 1,000 auctions, the clearance rate was pushed into the 50’s. This weekend will be the second largest one in the city’s history. The clearance rate may have dipped into the 60’s but due to the very high volume of auctions the actual number of sales is very healthy. In contrast the private sale market appears to be rather stable with key metrics not changing from 34 days on market for houses and vendor discounting of -5.6 per cent. Key data Clearance rate week ending 24 November: 65.1 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 1 December: 1,494 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 24 November: 34 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 24 November: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.7 per cent lower in month ending 24 November Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialis

Australia’s population future?

The Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS released national population projections earlier this week. The data looks at the projected growth in the national population from 2012 through to 2101 and the data provides a fascinating insight into the potential future of Australia over the coming years and decades. The projections look at three different scenarios which can be read about here. For the purposes of this blog post we are utilising ‘Series B’ or the medium level projections. Based on this series, Australia’s population was estimated to be 22,721,995 persons in 2012, by 2101 the population is projected to be 136% higher at 53,564,333 persons. Under this scenario we would see the national population from 2012 having doubled by 2071. Keep in mind Australia was first settled by Europeans in 1788 so it took 224 years to get to the 2012 population and it projected to double in just 59 years. Projections are also provided at a state and capital city level from 2012 through to 2061, at which time the national population is projected to be 41,513,375. The above table details the estimated population as at June 2012 and the percentage of the national population across each state and compares it to the same projected data for 2061 as well as showing the average annual growth rate over the period. At a state level, the proportion of the national population is projected to fall in New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania and Northern Territory. The proportion is projected to remain static in Victoria and rise across Queensland, Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory. Western Australia 2.0% , Queensland 1.5% and the Australian Capital Territory 1.4% are projected to record the greatest average annual rate of population growth while Tasmania 0.2% , South Australia 0.7% and New South Wales 0.9% are projected to record the lowest growth rate. Of course these are just population projections and are no way set in stone however, it does seem inevitable that the population of the country will expand substantially even based on the low series of assumptions over time. The big question remains where and how will we house all of these additional citizens? Based on the data provided in the release it seems that a significant majority of the population will continue to live within our capital cities. The above table details the estimated population as at June 2012 and the percentage of each state’s population across each capital city and compares it to the same projected data for 2061 as well as showing the average annual growth rate over the period. There are quite a few interesting points to take from these long-term projections. Firstly, by 2061 Sydney will no longer be the nation’s most populous city and Brisbane will no longer be the nation’s third most populous city. Melbourne will overtake Sydney as the most populous city in 2053 and Perth will overtake Brisbane as the third most populous city in 2028. The proportion of Australian’s living within a capital city is already quite high at 66.1% however, this is projected to increase to 73.4% by 2061. Think about that, out of a projected population of 41.5 million, almost three out of every four Australians will live in a capital city. If we focus on the four most populous capital cities, 57.3% of Australians currently live in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane or Perth. Based on the population projections, by 2061 65.8% of the total national population will live in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth. Should this scenario actually come to fruition it will create significant challenges for each of these cities. Obviously housing is a challenge which immediately comes to mind, how and where these people can be housed and what it would mean for property values. Over time the capital city areas do expand however, for a city such as Sydney that is surrounded by water and national parks the scope to expand is quite limited. No wonder the inner city areas are undergoing such rapid densification. Elsewhere you can continue to grow the urban sprawl but there must be a consideration around how people travel around the city and commute to their jobs. Transport infrastructure is typically already insufficient, without appropriate investment levels how much worse would it be by 2061? Of course, for some, purchasing a home in a capital city is already out of reach; how do Governments ensure that a greater number and proportion of capital city residents doesn’t just lead to further escalation of property values? Of course these figures are in no way set in stone however, it does appear that the country’s population will continue to grow which will pose myriad challenges. In my opinion the greatest concern is the projection of a greater centralisation of the population to our capital cities and more pointedly the four most populous cities. As mentioned, in each of these cities there are already affordability barriers for certain home buyer cohorts and investment in transport infrastructure has not been sufficient. In my opinion we should be looking to a decentralisation of the population rather than encouraging more and more people to the capital city. Not only do regional markets tend to have lower house values, in many instances they offer a superior lifestyle than that which is available within our major capital cities. The biggest challenge of course is employment in regional areas however, with the advent of high speed internet and major infrastructure projects such as the National Broadband Network NBN we will hopefully see the nature of work change with more telecommuting taking place and less focus on physically being located within an office. Alternatively, many businesses do not necessarily need to be located within a major capital city. Perhaps Governments could incentivise major businesses to locate their headquarters or major offices outside of Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane or Perth. Let me know what you think is this the population future you want and how should our population look by 2061?

Week ending 24 November 2013

A preliminary clearance rate of 66.7 per cent was reached from 996 auctions this week in Melbourne. For three consecutive weeks the clearance rate has been below 70 per cent highlighting the cooling of conditions in the residential auction market. With a few more weekends of over 1,000 auctions – including around 1,500 next week – buyers will be able to drive a better bargain. The growth cycle over the past year has stopped according to the dwelling price index. The index has dropped again this week and is also down, by 0.7 per cent, over the last month. Time on market for houses sold by private sale remains stable at 34 days, which is the same as last week. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Homes are selling in Melbourne, just not as fast as in Sydney

RP Data compares the number of new residential listings and total listings on a weekly basis as they help to provide a rounded view of the market. From the perspective of many, the volume of sales can be more important than the price of those sales. The past two years saw a very low volume of residential sales in Melbourne which is a reflection of conservative decision-making by consumers who, as the saying goes, ‘preferred to save rather than spend.’ There is no doubt that this year, the market has picked up but there is a long way to go. The most recent data shows that there are 16.7 per cent fewer overall homes for sale in Melbourne than 12 months ago. Given that the volume of new listings is up by 1 per cent, this is a sign that older stock is being cleared and the property market is improving, but only moderately. Victoria-wide, the picture is not as strong with overall listings only being lower by 10 per cent and new listings down by 1.7 per cent. It is often the case that the regional market moves more slowly and is less volatile that the metropolitan and that is the current case. In stark contrast, the residential market in Sydney is moving homes very rapidly with total listings down 26.3 per cent and new listings up only 4 per cent. Demand is clearly very strong in the Sydney market right now. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Where would you buy if you were a first home buyer looking for a house?

The other day someone asked me if I was a first home buyer where would I choose to buy? It’s a tough question, particularly if I was looking to buy my first home in Sydney where the median house price is now just over $700,000. Casting my mind back to 2002 when my wife and I bought our first home in Brisbane, here are the key things we were looking for: Top of our list was something that we could afford – we had a stretch budget of about $250,000. The second priority was to buy a home we thought would appreciate in value – we would eventually want to upgrade and viewed our first home as a stepping stone to something ‘more comfortable’. Third was that we wanted a detached home with a backyard. There were a few other considerations: we wanted a location that wouldn’t take too long to get into the city where we both worked by public transport, ideally the home would have at least three bedrooms; I wanted a man cave/shed while my wife was keen for some entertaining space such as a back deck. Here’s the house we settled on – an original and unrenovated post-war home with three bedrooms in Moorooka on 607sqm of land. Moorooka is about 10km south of the Brisbane CBD and at the time wasn’t high on the desirability scale for most buyers. The kitchen was an original and in typical 50’s style. We did a lot of our own renovations over time like ripping up the carpet to expose the wooden floors, painting and some basic landscaping. While the home was rough around the edges and not all that comfortable, it was well connected to transport option of train or bus , had decent arterial road connections M1 Motorway / Ipswich Road / Beaudesert Road , I had a shed downstairs that was almost high enough to walk under without stooping and we could entertain in the back yard as long as it didn’t rain . We paid $245,000 and sold the property for $350,000 four years later. It’s hard to draw parallels between market conditions back in 2002 and now; the median house price at Moorooka has risen to $500,000 which is more than double what it was back in 2002. I think if I was a first home buyer today I would probably have fairly similar expectations – stick to a budget that doesn’t stretch the finances and entertainment fund too much, look for an area that is likely to appreciate in value – ideally a detached home but I appreciate that is becoming more difficult due to pricing in many locations . I think I would be we willing to sacrifice a bedroom, opt for a smaller backyard and lose the man cave if that meant buying closer to where I worked and played. Interestingly, a survey recently commissioned by Aussie and undertaken by RP Data showed the top five considerations for first home buyers were: Rank Factor 1 Affordability 2 Number of bedrooms 3 Garage / off street parking 4 Capital Growth 5 Proximity to – Public transport So… based on the average first home buyer loan size across each state and allowing for a 20% deposit, here are my personal picks for buying a detached home as a first home buyer. Please note that I am not providing any advice here. Readers should undertake their own research and determine the suburbs that are best for them based on their own due diligence, budgets and preferences. At the end of my blog I have provided tables that outline the full list of suburbs that suit the selection criteria ie a median house value that is equal to or less than the average first home buyer loan size plus 20% . I would be very interested in reader views on where they would be seeking to buy based on these suburbs or areas outside of the list. Sydney: Being a first home buyer in Sydney is tough. The median house price is the highest of any capital city at $705,000; for this reason many first home buyers are either blocked from the market financially or they choose more affordable locations located far from the city centre which are often not as well serviced by transport options and other necessities such as schools, health care, retail and social options. Alternatively, more first home buyers are sacrificing the back yard and opting for higher density living such as a town home or apartment. Personally, I think Sydney is the only city where I would be seeking an apartment over a house so I could buy closer to the city and social precincts but I have stuck to the theme and selected a suburb for detached housing The average first home buyer loan size in NSW, based on the September housing finance data from the ABS was $298,500. Adding a 20% deposit we can assume the typical first home buyer in NSW is spending around $360,000 on their first dwelling. There are 71 suburbs across the Greater Sydney metro area with a median house value of $360,000 or less. Most detached houses with a median value at or under $360,000 are located a long distance from the city, mostly around the Central Coast, Campbelltown and Blacktown. My pick for a house within this price range is the suburb of Cambridge Park, located in the Penrith council region. The suburb is located about 45km from the Sydney CBD and is reasonably well serviced by transport options; the Western Motorway is in close proximity, as is the Kingswood and Penrith train station. The median house value at Cambridge Park is $350,570 and last year there were 101 house sales of which 85% sold under $400,000. The average block size at Cambridge Park is 696sqm, so most detached homes have large yards. Melbourne: Melbourne dwelling values have risen by almost 55% since the beginning of 2007 which has created some affordability barriers for first home buyers in the local market place. The median house price for Melbourne is now $595,000 which is still a lot less than Sydney’s $705,000 but much higher than it was before the three cycles of growth the market has been through over the past six years. The average first home buyer loan size in Victoria, based on the September housing finance data from the ABS was $280,300. Adding a 20% deposit we can assume the typical first home buyer in Vic is spending around $340,000 on their first dwelling. There are 39 suburbs across the Melbourne metropolitan area where the median house value is less than or equal to $340,000. Most detached houses with a median value at or under $340,000 are located around the city fringe in the council regions of Casey, Melton, Brimbank and Hume. My pick for a suburb to buy a first house within this price range is Hoppers Crossing which is located in the Wyndham council region about 23km west of the Melbourne CBD. The suburb is serviced by its own train station and has efficient access to the Princes Freeway. The median house value at Hoppers Crossing $334,600 and last year there were 492 houses sold, of which 88% were priced under $400,000. The average land area at Hoppers Crossing is 625sqm, highlighting that this suburb typically shows large block sizes for detached housing. Brisbane: Brisbane’s housing market has been much more sedate when it comes to capital growth over the past five years. From January 2009 through to October 2013 Brisbane dwelling values have risen by just 1% compared with a 36% rise in Melbourne values and a 35% rise in Sydney values. The lack of capital gains across the Brisbane market has provided a substantial improvement in housing affordability compared with the other major capital cities. In fact, the median house price for Brisbane, at $453,000, is 36% lower than Sydney’s median house price and 24% lower than Melbourne’s. For first home buyers this means housing options closer to the city tend to be more diverse and available. The average first home buyer loan size in Qld, based on the September housing finance data from the ABS was $273,500. Adding a 20% deposit we can assume the typical first home buyer in Qld is spending around $330,000 on their first dwelling. There are 79 suburbs across Greater Brisbane with a median house value equal to or lower than $340,000, with most of these suburbs located around the city fringe in the council regions of Ipswich, Logan and Moreton Bay. My pick for a first home buyers suburb within this price range for houses is Strathpine which is located within the Moreton Bay council region about 19km north of the Brisbane CBD. The suburb of Strathpine is serviced by a train station and has efficient access to the Gateway Motorway, Bruce Highway and Gympie arterial road. The median house value at Strathpine is about $333,000 and over the past year there have been 127 houses sold of which 91% had a sale price of $400,000 or less. The average land area is 698sqm suggesting most houses are positioned on a large block of land. Adelaide: Adelaide’s housing market has been relatively quiet over the current growth cycle with dwelling values rising by just 1.9% over the twelve months to October 2013. Since the beginning of 2009 Adelaide dwelling values have increased by 27% compared with 38% in Sydney, 54% in Melbourne, 21% in Brisbane and 8.5% in Perth. Adelaide is the most affordable mainland capital city with a median house price of $390,000. Such an affordable market potentially provides first home buyers with an easier entry point to the housing market and more diversity in their options. The average first home buyer loan size in SA, based on the September housing finance data from the ABS was $229,900. Adding a 20% deposit we can assume the typical first home buyer in SA is spending around $276,000 on their first dwelling. There are 36 suburbs across Greater Adelaide with a median house value equal to or lower than $276,000, with most of these suburbs located to the north of Adelaide in the Playford and Salisbury council regions. My pick for a first home buyer seeking a house in Adelaide would be O’Sullivan Beach, located in the Onkaparinga council region about 25km south of the Adelaide CBD. The suburb used to be one to be avoided due to the oil refinery, however the refinery is long gone and there is a large amount of capital works underway in the Onkaparinga area including an extension of the railway line and upgrade of the expressway linking to Adelaide which will substantially boost accessibility to the area. The median house value at O’Sullivan Beach is $248,450 and there have been 35 house sales over the past 12 months with 89% of these sales under $400,000. Block sizes are large, averaging 672sqm. Perth: Perth’s housing market has had a strong run in values through early 2013 however the market is now slowing down. In fact Perth values fell by 0.6% over the three months ending October 2013 but are 6.9% higher over the year. The longer term growth rate has been quite sedate in Perth with dwelling values rising by 8.5% since the beginning of 2009. Over the same period Melbourne values rose 54%, Sydney values were 38% higher and Brisbane values were 21% higher. With a lower rate of growth over the past five or so years, the relative affordability of Perth houses has improved compared with Sydney and Melbourne. With a median house price of $508,000, Perth houses are on average about 28% lower than Sydney’s and 15% lower than Melbourne’s The average first home buyer loan size in WA, based on the September housing finance data from the ABS was $315,300. Adding a 20% deposit we can assume the typical first home buyer in WA is spending around $380,000 on their first dwelling. There are 29 suburbs across Greater Perth with a median house value equal to or lower than $380,000, with most of these suburbs located in the council regions of Swan, Armadale and Kwinana. My pick for a first home buyer seeking a detached house in Perth is Lockridge, located in the Swan council region. Situated just 11.6km from the Perth CBD, Lockridge is the most affordable suburb within 12km of the Perth CBD and is strategically located with relatively efficient road access via the Tonkin Highway and Guildford Road and the Great Eastern Highway. Additionally, Guildford train station is close by for public transport. The suburb’s close position to the city and transport is likely to see housing stock improve over the coming years as more buyers looking for affordable properties that are well serviced choose to live in this area. The median house value at Lockridge is $353,700 and there have been 59 house sales over the past twelve months, 78% of which were sold at a price under $400,000. TABLES: Suburbs with a median house value which is equal to or lower than the typical first home buyer loan amount plus 20% deposit Sydney suburbs with a median house value of $360,000 or less Suburb LGA Distance from CBD Median Value Number Sold % sales under $400k AMBARVALE Campbelltown 45.7 $338,023 67 88.1% BERKELEY VALE Wyong 62.1 $341,748 173 78.0% BIDWILL Blacktown 38.2 $277,618 32 100.0% BLACKETT Blacktown 38.3 $266,549 46 100.0% BLACKHEATH Blue Mountains 86.7 $343,757 151 62.3% BLUE HAVEN Wyong 77.0 $307,670 143 94.4% BRADBURY Campbelltown 43.6 $347,157 158 84.8% BUDGEWOI Wyong 76.8 $304,240 76 82.9% BUFF POINT Wyong 76.5 $313,828 81 90.1% BULLABURRA Blue Mountains 73.9 $314,576 27 66.7% BUSBY Liverpool 30.4 $355,138 54 92.6% BUXTON Wollondilly 75.6 $335,022 47 78.7% CAMBRIDGE PARK Penrith 45.7 $350,570 101 85.1% CAMPBELLTOWN Campbelltown 43.3 $339,664 155 73.5% CANTON BEACH Wyong 71.7 $279,385 19 94.7% CARTWRIGHT Liverpool 30.2 $336,181 34 94.1% CHAIN VALLEY BAY Wyong 84.4 $331,983 31 83.9% CHARMHAVEN Wyong 75.2 $281,410 44 93.2% COLYTON Penrith 38.5 $348,272 123 85.4% DHARRUK Blacktown 37.9 $310,164 43 95.3% EAGLE VALE Campbelltown 41.4 $334,148 71 77.5% EMERTON Blacktown 39.0 $268,439 32 100.0% ESCHOL PARK Campbelltown 41.8 $332,032 49 98.0% GOROKAN Wyong 72.8 $275,644 189 91.0% GWANDALAN Wyong 87.2 $297,245 89 71.9% HALEKULANI Wyong 78.1 $304,863 51 92.2% HAZELBROOK Blue Mountains 70.5 $343,221 100 76.0% HEBERSHAM Blacktown 37.3 $306,377 80 98.8% HECKENBERG Liverpool 29.4 $357,687 35 74.3% KANWAL Wyong 71.2 $310,148 53 92.5% KATOOMBA Blue Mountains 84.7 $334,336 210 74.3% KILLARNEY VALE Wyong 59.6 $341,805 148 79.7% LAKE HAVEN Wyong 73.6 $312,268 72 90.3% LAKE MUNMORAH Wyong 81.4 $324,575 107 81.3% LAWSON Blue Mountains 72.8 $339,161 52 71.2% LETHBRIDGE PARK Blacktown 39.6 $262,236 73 98.6% LEUMEAH Campbelltown 40.1 $350,115 113 79.6% MACQUARIE FIELDS Campbelltown 32.4 $355,842 130 84.6% MANNERING PARK Wyong 83.2 $285,851 56 83.9% MEDLOW BATH Blue Mountains 86.8 $321,948 23 82.6% MILLER Liverpool 30.7 $347,712 28 89.3% MINTO Campbelltown 38.0 $336,234 126 81.7% MOUNT VICTORIA Blue Mountains 94.4 $310,480 32 87.5% NARARA Gosford 52.9 $351,153 119 70.6% NIAGARA PARK Gosford 54.9 $333,785 40 90.0% NORAVILLE Wyong 73.0 $316,379 76 82.9% NORTH GOSFORD Gosford 50.8 $331,417 48 85.4% NORTH ST MARYS Penrith 40.3 $310,416 67 95.5% ROSEMEADOW Campbelltown 47.0 $329,540 97 83.5% SAN REMO Wyong 77.4 $268,725 100 100.0% SHALVEY Blacktown 39.5 $290,787 55 94.5% SPENCER Gosford 46.6 $235,878 17 100.0% SPRINGFIELD Gosford 50.3 $354,148 79 54.4% ST HELENS PARK Campbelltown 45.3 $346,425 99 76.8% ST MARYS Penrith 41.7 $351,880 151 70.9% SUMMERLAND POINT Wyong 86.4 $318,573 71 76.1% TACOMA Wyong 67.6 $355,765 12 75.0% TAHMOOR Wollondilly 70.0 $340,242 104 64.4% TOUKLEY Wyong 73.7 $306,687 109 78.9% TREGEAR Blacktown 40.0 $254,283 42 100.0% TUGGERAH Wyong 64.6 $320,471 17 94.1% TUGGERAWONG Wyong 69.3 $309,341 22 81.8% VINEYARD Hawkesbury 40.5 $187,058 11 27.3% WARRAGAMBA Wollondilly 56.0 $296,459 22 95.5% WATANOBBI Wyong 68.7 $286,550 86 94.2% WHALAN Blacktown 38.7 $267,535 86 98.8% WILLMOT Blacktown 40.9 $250,875 45 100.0% WYOMING Gosford 52.4 $337,104 172 88.4% WYONG Wyong 67.7 $324,348 79 75.9% WYONGAH Wyong 70.3 $314,537 28 92.9% YANDERRA Wollondilly 77.6 $321,750 15 93.3% Melbourne suburbs with a median house value of $340,000 or less Suburb LGA Distance from CBD Median Value Number Sold % sales under $400k ALBANVALE Brimbank 18.4 $300,276 66 95.5% ARDEER Brimbank 14.3 $328,198 42 95.2% BADGER CREEK Yarra Ranges 53.4 $316,733 22 100.0% BAXTER Mornington Peninsula 45.7 $310,250 39 94.9% BROADMEADOWS Hume 15.5 $314,371 127 93.7% CARRUM DOWNS Frankston 36.6 $316,872 343 94.2% COOLAROO Hume 18.3 $273,953 32 100.0% CRANBOURNE Casey 42.3 $301,431 267 86.1% CRANBOURNE NORTH Casey 41.6 $330,417 313 71.6% CRANBOURNE WEST Casey 40.7 $312,681 202 82.2% CRIB POINT Mornington Peninsula 63.8 $328,106 54 87.0% DALLAS Hume 16.3 $272,798 67 97.0% DEER PARK Brimbank 17.0 $333,900 222 83.8% DIGGERS REST Melton 31.9 $293,165 21 90.5% DOVETON Casey 31.0 $296,635 129 96.1% EUMEMMERRING Casey 32.2 $321,447 17 94.1% FRANKSTON NORTH Frankston 38.8 $259,090 101 99.0% HAMPTON PARK Casey 37.0 $317,883 296 93.9% HASTINGS Mornington Peninsula 57.1 $330,628 122 74.6% HOPPERS CROSSING Wyndham 23.3 $334,637 492 87.8% JACANA Hume 15.0 $307,054 24 95.8% JUNCTION VILLAGE Casey 46.0 $303,794 16 93.8% KINGS PARK Brimbank 18.7 $314,811 82 98.8% KOO WEE RUP Cardinia 62.6 $314,965 39 84.6% KURUNJANG Melton 36.5 $295,150 127 96.1% LANG LANG Cardinia 76.2 $305,872 19 94.7% LAVERTON Wyndham 17.3 $310,746 72 95.8% MEADOW HEIGHTS Hume 18.8 $304,873 115 92.2% MELTON Melton 34.6 $255,962 114 96.5% MELTON SOUTH Melton 34.8 $257,471 148 97.3% MELTON WEST Melton 40.2 $307,087 263 88.6% MILLGROVE Yarra Ranges 61.2 $241,452 41 100.0% ROCKBANK Melton 27.4 $291,074 10 100.0% ST ALBANS Brimbank 15.4 $338,663 334 87.1% WARBURTON Yarra Ranges 66.6 $317,048 52 90.4% WARNEET Casey 55.6 $335,079 12 100.0% WERRIBEE Wyndham 28.9 $313,498 492 82.1% WOORI YALLOCK Yarra Ranges 51.5 $325,934 55 92.7% WYNDHAM VALE Wyndham 31.5 $305,842 351 93.7% Brisbane suburbs with a median house value of $330,000 or less Suburb LGA Distance from CBD Median Value Number Sold % sales under $400k ACACIA RIDGE Brisbane 12.8 $311,024 85 91.8% BASIN POCKET Ipswich 29.3 $229,697 16 100.0% BEACHMERE Moreton Bay 39.6 $315,598 39 79.5% BEENLEIGH Logan 31.6 $283,773 76 97.4% BELLARA Moreton Bay 46.9 $305,679 52 86.5% BELLBIRD PARK Ipswich 24.1 $301,586 87 74.7% BELLMERE Moreton Bay 45.7 $313,671 73 79.5% BETHANIA Logan 27.1 $273,587 46 91.3% BLACKSTONE Ipswich 28.2 $268,620 15 93.3% BOOVAL Ipswich 28.2 $266,741 37 97.3% BORONIA HEIGHTS Logan 24.2 $302,893 112 95.5% BRASSALL Ipswich 31.8 $288,194 132 84.8% BROWNS PLAINS Logan 21.7 $294,457 79 93.7% BUNDAMBA Ipswich 26.2 $254,016 79 100.0% CABOOLTURE Moreton Bay 45.5 $270,524 276 77.9% CABOOLTURE SOUTH Moreton Bay 42.7 $257,865 85 96.5% CAMIRA Ipswich 21.1 $335,268 93 80.6% CHURCHILL Ipswich 32.8 $254,568 26 84.6% COALFALLS Ipswich 31.9 $283,849 15 100.0% COLLINGWOOD PARK Ipswich 23.9 $282,252 107 91.6% COOCHIEMUDLO ISLAND Redland 31.6 $277,687 22 95.5% CRESTMEAD Logan 24.4 $268,773 143 99.3% DARRA Brisbane 13.1 $332,396 42 85.7% DECEPTION BAY Moreton Bay 32.2 $286,382 265 89.8% DINMORE Ipswich 23.7 $219,381 12 100.0% DONNYBROOK Moreton Bay 52.4 $308,570 18 72.2% DURACK Brisbane 13.9 $321,094 64 82.8% EAGLEBY Logan 32.0 $247,595 98 91.8% EAST IPSWICH Ipswich 29.1 $254,703 45 88.9% EASTERN HEIGHTS Ipswich 30.4 $259,047 68 88.2% EBBW VALE Ipswich 25.1 $224,392 16 100.0% EDENS LANDING Logan 29.3 $323,143 81 88.9% FLINDERS VIEW Ipswich 31.7 $319,243 80 71.3% GAILES Ipswich 19.7 $225,952 22 100.0% GOODNA Ipswich 20.1 $251,557 74 98.6% HILLCREST Logan 22.0 $312,926 83 91.6% HOLMVIEW Logan #N/A $291,303 26 65.4% INALA Brisbane 14.4 $282,549 138 94.9% IPSWICH Ipswich 31.4 $308,874 53 81.1% KALLANGUR Moreton Bay 24.7 $317,563 294 93.5% KINGSTON Logan 22.7 $250,408 113 98.2% LAMB ISLAND Redland 38.7 $197,495 11 100.0% LAWNTON Moreton Bay 21.5 $324,917 94 63.8% LEICHHARDT Ipswich 33.6 $215,920 48 100.0% LOGAN CENTRAL Logan 20.8 $245,532 53 98.1% LOGANLEA Logan 24.9 $270,646 69 84.1% MACLEAY ISLAND Redland 36.8 $228,236 58 94.8% MARBURG Ipswich 44.5 $291,053 19 89.5% MARSDEN Logan 23.6 $281,066 141 92.9% MORAYFIELD Moreton Bay 38.3 $313,972 252 73.4% MOUNT WARREN PARK Logan 33.8 $329,780 66 86.4% NEWTOWN Ipswich 29.6 $303,529 27 85.2% NORTH BOOVAL Ipswich 27.3 $238,471 26 96.2% NORTH IPSWICH Ipswich 29.7 $258,252 78 97.4% ONE MILE Ipswich 33.9 $224,769 34 97.1% PETRIE Moreton Bay 23.7 $331,641 153 71.2% RACEVIEW Ipswich 30.9 $278,092 146 96.6% REDBANK Ipswich 21.2 $259,070 19 100.0% REDBANK PLAINS Ipswich 26.8 $257,658 189 97.4% REDCLIFFE Moreton Bay 28.3 $338,836 122 68.9% RIVERVIEW Ipswich 22.4 $220,579 18 100.0% ROCKLEA Brisbane 9.2 $298,796 39 87.2% ROSEWOOD Ipswich 46.3 $252,687 42 92.9% RUSSELL ISLAND Redland 42.2 $202,372 58 96.6% SADLIERS CROSSING Ipswich 32.1 $292,475 21 85.7% SILKSTONE Ipswich 28.9 $257,321 56 98.2% SLACKS CREEK Logan 21.1 $278,222 132 90.2% STRATHPINE Moreton Bay 19.2 $332,556 127 91.3% TIVOLI Ipswich 28.1 $251,991 26 100.0% TOORBUL Moreton Bay 48.5 $312,173 18 88.9% WATERFORD Logan 28.7 $323,370 56 83.9% WATERFORD WEST Logan 26.4 $292,118 64 92.2% WILLOWBANK Ipswich 42.1 $286,891 14 78.6% WOODEND Ipswich 30.9 $298,382 24 95.8% WOODFORD Moreton Bay 63.2 $319,701 34 82.4% WOODRIDGE Logan 19.1 $242,138 104 100.0% WULKURAKA Ipswich 33.7 $275,440 12 91.7% YAMANTO Ipswich 34.6 $329,779 88 86.4% Adelaide suburbs with a median house value of $276,000 or less Suburb LGA Distance from CBD Median Value Number Sold % sales under $400k ANDREWS FARM Playford 28.1 257839 158 98.7% BRAHMA LODGE Salisbury 17.2 $245,920 58 98.3% BURTON Salisbury 20.7 $267,198 78 92.3% CHRISTIE DOWNS Onkaparinga 24.7 $241,484 94 98.9% CRAIGMORE Playford 26.7 $264,429 164 94.5% DAVOREN PARK Playford 26.6 $172,236 78 100.0% ELIZABETH Playford 23.6 $206,684 18 100.0% ELIZABETH DOWNS Playford 26.5 $187,622 81 98.8% ELIZABETH EAST Playford 23.0 $203,437 64 100.0% ELIZABETH GROVE Playford 21.9 $194,669 22 100.0% ELIZABETH NORTH Playford 25.8 $173,864 36 100.0% ELIZABETH PARK Playford 24.9 $193,210 51 100.0% ELIZABETH SOUTH Playford 21.0 $185,391 22 100.0% ELIZABETH VALE Playford 20.4 $212,977 52 100.0% EVANSTON Gawler 35.9 251874 25 96.0% EVANSTON GARDENS Gawler 34.5 245690.5 29 93.1% HACKHAM Onkaparinga 26.1 $248,504 63 98.4% HACKHAM WEST Onkaparinga 25.5 $232,986 61 100.0% HUNTFIELD HEIGHTS Onkaparinga 26.9 $249,294 70 97.1% INGLE FARM Salisbury 11.6 $271,172 136 96.3% MORPHETT VALE Onkaparinga 22.9 $264,893 411 97.1% MUNNO PARA Playford 30.1 209081 76 100.0% NOARLUNGA DOWNS Onkaparinga 27.7 $253,958 70 85.7% O’SULLIVAN BEACH Onkaparinga 25.3 248452.5 35 88.6% PARA HILLS Salisbury 13.8 $271,015 130 98.5% PARA HILLS WEST Salisbury 14.0 $269,928 45 97.8% PARAFIELD GARDENS Salisbury 15.6 $267,633 195 94.9% PARALOWIE Salisbury 18.5 $265,107 234 95.3% SALISBURY Salisbury 18.1 $261,538 103 95.1% SALISBURY DOWNS Salisbury 17.0 $262,741 71 100.0% SALISBURY EAST Salisbury 17.5 $264,107 136 97.1% SALISBURY NORTH Salisbury 20.1 $229,214 96 97.9% SALISBURY PARK Salisbury 19.3 $260,844 30 96.7% SMITHFIELD Playford 27.7 218620 32 100.0% SMITHFIELD PLAINS Playford 28.4 175641 35 100.0% WINGFIELD Port Adelaide Enfield 9.9 $232,167 11&l

Week ending 24 November

Melbourne buyers will be spoilt for choice again this weekend with another 1,000 plus weekend. At the conclusion of this weekend Melbourne will be in the remarkable position of having only had two weeks in the past two months with less than 1,000 homes offered at auction. RP Data is expecting 1,089 auctions in Melbourne this week and 1,252 across Victoria. The last fortnight has shown that conditions are very balanced between buyers and sellers in the auction market. After a very strong result from the largest weekend of auctions ever there have been two weeks with more moderate levels of demand. At the same time in the private sale market conditions are tightening with reducing days on market and lower levels of discounting. The market remains susceptible to any negative factors in the broader economy. Key data Clearance rate week ending 17 November: 69 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 24 November: 1,089 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 17 November: 34 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 17 November: -5.6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 4.7 per cent higher in month ending 17 November Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 17 November 2013

A preliminary clearance rate of 70.3 per cent was reached from 1,119 auction results so far this week in Melbourne. This was the third largest auction weekend this year and the seventh with over 1,000 auctions scheduled this year for the city. As the Melbourne market heads to the end of the year it appears that buyers won’t be confronted by price rises of any significance. After a year of ongoing moderate growth, demand seems to have found a new level. Results over the last fortnight and a recent reduction in Melbourne home values of 0.5 per cent over the last month according to the RP Data-Rismark Daily Home Value Index suggests a pause in the current growth cycle. Time on market for houses sold by private sale remain healthy at 34 days up only slightly from last weeks 33 days. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

McMansions continue to be built despite the high cost of land, particularly in New South Wales

Data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics earlier this week showed that the average size of Australian homes has started to trend lower over recent years. We discuss the broad trends in the week’s RP Data Property Pulse available to RP Data subscribers however; there are some surprising results at an individual state level. Sydney is the most expensive capital city in the country and the New South Wales results act as a good proxy for that city. Despite the fact that Sydney is the most expensive city, the average size of a new house in New South Wales over last financial year was 266.20 sqm; the largest average floor area of any state. Despite the fact that New South Wales residential property is typically more expensive than other states, they continue to build the largest new homes. Across the other states, the average floor area of new homes were recorded at: 243.0 sqm in Victoria, 239.6 sqm in Queensland, 203.90 sqm in South Australia, 234.5 sqm in Western Australia and 200.30 sqm in Tasmania. The average floor area in New South Wales is much greater than all other states while the floor area in Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia are quite similar. Typical new home sizes in South Australia and Tasmania are significantly lower than those across the other states. You can’t build a house unless you have a vacant block of land to construct the home on. The median land prices across the states as at June 2013 were recorded at: $204,000 in New South Wales, $189,000 in Victoria, $190,000 in Queensland, $150,000 in South Australia, $229,100 in Western Australia and $100,000 across Tasmania. This data highlights that the cost of vacant land in South Australia and Tasmania is significantly lower than that across the other states. Not only are South Australian and Tasmanian new houses much smaller than those across the other states, the cost of purchasing the vacant land is also significantly lower. Another component to consider is the typical size of the vacant land and how that impacts both the size and type of home that can be built but also the cost of purchasing the land. Across the states, the median land sizes are recorded at: 700 sqm in New South Wales, 570 sqm in Victoria, 696 sqm in Queensland, 496 sqm in South Australia, 480 sqm in Western Australia and 933 sqm in Tasmania. Outside of Tasmania, lot sizes in New South Wales are the greatest of all states. Tasmania which has comparatively cheap land has a much larger typical lot size whereas; South Australia has a comparatively small lot size. Of course there are other factors outside of just the cost and size of land which determines the size of homes. Specifically it is important to consider incomes, according to data released in the 2011 Census, median household incomes in South Australia and Tasmania are much lower than those across the other states. This obviously has an impact on the price at which residents can purchase homes. If we also look at the average number of people per household along with the average number of bedrooms per dwelling we see that there is an excess supply of bed rooms. In all states we have a greater number of bedrooms than we do persons per household, keeping in mind that most couples will share a bed. Given this, we don’t actually need as much space as we have in most homes. Certainly some younger families will buy larger homes than they need to cater for their growing needs but the broader trends show we have an excess supply of units. Builders, developers and price sensitive purchases probably need to consider foregoing an extra bedroom in order to reduce the cost of houses. Overall, it seems somewhat counter-intuitive that the states where housing is most expensive they continue to build much larger new houses while the more affordable states build smaller homes. Smaller homes and potentially smaller lot sizes would help to improve the affordability of homes in the more expensive states. From a potential buyers perspective they probably need to reassess just how much space they need when they are considering their purchase. Of course, a reduction in the cost of land which could be aided by quicker development approvals, greater supply of land and reduced development fees and charges would also help reduce the cost of housing.

Week ending 17 November

RP Data is expecting 1,178 auctions in Melbourne this week and 1,328 across Victoria. This is the seventh week this year with in excess of 1,000 auctions. Bentleigh East has the most with 19 followed by 18 in Brighton and Reservoir. Last week may have seen a small reduction in the clearance rate but at this stage it does not indicate a substantial change in market conditions. There is certainly no reduction in demand in the private sale market with time on market for houses dropping again, this week from 34 to 33 days. There was also a commensurate reduction in vendor discounting to -5.8 per cent suggesting buyers are spending more in this competitive market. This data reflects the overall situation which is seeing new residential listings increase compared to a year ago whilst the overall number of home for sale has reduced. Key data Clearance rate week ending 10 November: 68.1 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 17 November: 1,178 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 10 November: 33 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 10 November: -5.8 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 5.1 per cent higher in month ending 10 November Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The most expensive suburbs in Melbourne

Melbourne currently has 39 suburbs with a median value in excess of one million dollars with the list predictably topped by Toorak. The list of the city’s most expensive suburbs is very stable due to their sought after location and high quality housing. Using the median value measure Toorak is almost twice as expensive as the second on the list, East Melbourne. The median value of a house in Toorak is $3.5M compared to $1.88 in East Melbourne and $1.82 in Brighton. The top ten is rounded out by Canterbury, Deepdene, Middle Park, Hawthorn East, Kew, Balwyn and Malvern. When viewed from the perspective of the overall value of all house sales in the past year Brighton tops the list with $604M worth of homes sold compared to $473M in Kew and $410M in Toorak. Deepdene is a very small suburb and has only seen $25.5M worth of houses sold in the past year. With the exception of Canterbury and Malvern sales data over the past 12 months shows that either less expensive homes have been offered for sale or the prices being paid are generally below the underlying values. There are six suburbs whose values are nearing a million and if the market continues to appreciate will reach that level soon. Ashburton, Ormond, St Kilda East, McKinnon, Prahran and Park Orchards have values between a million and $950,000. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 10 November 2013

A preliminary clearance rate of 69.2 per cent for Melbourne was reached from 996 auction results for the city so far this week. This was the sixth week where more than 1,000 auctions were scheduled for Melbourne. The market delivered a result that is lower by way of trend for the past few months which suggests that for the remaining few selling weekends we will see balanced conditions for buyers and sellers. RP Data’s latest release provides an update on overall transactions numbers this year and shows that for the Melbourne market the number of sales is 7 per cent higher than last year but 21 per cent below the peak of 2007. These numbers are based on sales that have been settled. Improved conditions this year will clearly result in both higher prices and sales volumes. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

How solid is Australia’s jobs market?

Jobs are an important element of the housing market equation…. Without a job it’s hard to keep up mortgage payments or apply for a loan; and the same can be said when the hours worked are too few. A weaker jobs market will generally translate to less wages growth and less upwards pressure on dwelling values. So it’s encouraging to see Australia’s labour market remains fairly tight, at least from an international standpoint. The labour market data for October which was released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics this week showed a headline seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of just 5.7% which is unchanged from September after an upwards revision over the month. As some international comparisons, unemployment in the USA is 7.2%, the Euro area is at 12.2%, United Kingdom has an unemployment rate of 7.7%, New Zealand is at 6.2% and Canada is recording unemployment of 6.9%. There are plenty of counties with a lower rate of unemployment than Australia’s for example, Japan @ 4.0%, Germany @5.2%, China @4.0%, Switzerland @3.0% , however Australia’s jobs market is looking ok at face value. Taking a look below the headlines though shows some aspects of the labour market which are softening. For a start, at a national level there were no full time jobs created over the past twelve months. The total number of jobs created over the twelve months to October 2013 was 89,200 of which there were 59,500 fewer full time jobs and 148,700 more part time jobs. The last time we saw such a divergence in full time versus part time jobs creation was back in 2008. At a state level we can get a clearer idea of where the jobs are being created and lost note that the below data isn’t seasonally adjusted . It’s encouraging to see that Queensland, where the jobs market has been patchy since the onset of the GFC, has recorded the highest level of jobs growth with 53,500 new positions over the past year. That equates to more than half the national total which is a very positive sign for the Queensland economy and housing market. Victoria is showing the second largest number of new jobs at 25,700 followed by Western Australia 18,400 then New South Wales 10,800 . There were 13,600 fewer jobs in South Australia and 5,600 fewer jobs in Tasmania. Analysing the data across full time and part time jobs creation gets a bit more interesting. Just to qualify this data before going into the detail, the Australian Bureau of Statitics classifies a part time job as one where the worker has worked for less than 35 hours over the week. So the definition is quite liberal. The downturn in full time jobs creation was caused almost entirely by a reduction of full time jobs in New South Wales where there were 48,700 fewer full time workers over the year. In balance, the level of part time jobs growth was the highest of any capital city, however the reduction in full time employment is disturbing and potentially is another factor why first time buyers are such a small proportion of the NSW housing market. Queensland, where overall jobs creation has been the strongest over the past year, recorded only 5,100 new full time jobs over the year, or about 9.6% of the total number of new jobs. Victoria created the most new full time jobs 11,400 over the past year and shows the best split between full time and part time jobs creation 44% of new jobs were full time and 56% of new jobs were part time . Part time workers as a proportion of the total number of jobs reached a new record high in October, comprising 30.5% of the jobs pool. Despite the rise in business confidence since the Federal election, the labour force data suggests that tough business conditions are causing employers to remain reluctant to make long term employment commitments at the moment. Another factor that suggests the jobs market isn’t quite as buoyant as what the headline figures would suggest is the participation rate which has been trending lower since November 2010. Participation in the labour force has moved from 66.0% in November 2010 to 64.8% in September and October this year. Clearly we are seeing more eligible members of the labour force ‘opt out’ due to either early retirement the ageing baby boomer cohort is no doubt fuelling the lower participation rate or frustration with an inability to secure a job. Without a lower participation rate the jobless rate would have certainly moved higher. Westpac have suggested that if the participation rate hadn’t slipped lower over the past six months the current rate of unemployment would be 6.5% nationally. An interesting feature of the declining participation rate is that it is being dragged lower primarily by males, rather than females, leaving the work force. The official forecast from Treasury is that the national unemployment rate will peak at 6.25% in June next year. If the participation rate continues to fall the official national jobless rate might not reach this high despite what appears to be softer underlying labour market conditions. It’s worthwhile reminding that unemployment is a lagging indicator; higher unemployment comes after weaker economic conditions. Leading indicators such as dwelling approvals, consumer and business sentiment, share market performance and number of hours worked have shown a much more positive flow over recent months suggesting that labour markets may benefit from these improved business conditions in the future.

Week ending 10 November

RP Data is expecting 1,048 auctions in Melbourne this week and 1,172 across Victoria. With October now ended and with just 6 selling weeks remaining for the year, it is timely to compare the year to date performance of the auction market. So far this year there has been just over 27,500 auctions with a clearance rate of 70 per cent. This compares very favourably to this time last year when there had been fewer – 22,000 in total – auctions and a much lower clearance rate of 56 per cent. The increased demand has caused prices to rise by 8.1 per cent over the year according to the October RP Data-Rismark House Price Index released last week. The rise in values has been welcomed by vendors and it will have also encouraged more vendors into the market which is why listings are higher than this time last year. These factors combine to create a vibrant property market in Melbourne. Key data • Clearance rate week ending 3 November: 70.8 per cent • Melbourne auctions expected week ending 10 November: 1,048 • Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 3 November: 34 days houses • Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 3 November: -6.1 per cent houses • Listings being prepared for market are 5.2 per cent higher in month ending 3 November Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Is it too late to decide to sell this year? Looking at the property market in Victoria

Following the encouraging results from the biggest week in history in the Victoria property market, some intending vendors may be asking if it’s too late to sell at auction this year. With only 7 weekends left in the year when an auction can realistically be held, a decision to list for sale would not leave much time for a marketing campaign to make the most of your homes assets. The most important person for a vendor to consult in making that decision is their real estate agent. After all, they are the experts at marketing and selling property. The key matters a real estate agent will consider will be the length of time needed to prepare a home for sale, the preparation of the marketing campaign including taking high quality photos, the writing, bookings and placement of the advertisement. These factors need to precede the actual sales campaign and be well executed to maximise the sale value. The real estate agent may also consider the volume and types of listings scheduled for the time required to hold the auction. For those considering selling by private sale there is a useful guide of the average time taking to sell a house at the moment which is the RP Data time on market measure. In the month of September houses took an average of 43 days to sell and units took 47 days. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 3 November 2013

A preliminary clearance rate of 71.2 per cent was reached from 146 auction results so far this week. Due to the low volume of auctions it is more important to look at the private sales market. RP Data has recorded a further tightening of the private sale market with the time on market for houses dropping again, this time from 36 days to 34. Conditions in the private sale market have been improving for sellers for the last year with time on market dropping 14 days. The same conditions are not apparent in the unit and apartment market where the time on market has not changed in any consistent manner over the past year. The price expectations of sellers are also being more closely matched by buyers in the market for houses sold at private sale where over the last year the vendor discount has dropped from 7.3 per cent to 6.2 per cent on a monthly basis. Homes sold at auction are not included in the days on market or vendor discounting measures as they are not relevant to fixed period campaigns and reserves are infrequently quoted. Volumes in the local auction market will increase again next week. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 3 November 2013

A preliminary clearance rate of 71.2 per cent was reached from 146 auction results so far this week. Due to the low volume of auctions it is more important to look at the private sales market. RP Data has recorded a further tightening of the private sale market with the time on market for houses dropping again, this time from 36 days to 34. Conditions in the private sale market have been improving for sellers for the last year with time on market dropping 14 days. The same conditions are not apparent in the unit and apartment market where the time on market has not changed in any consistent manner over the past year. The price expectations of sellers are also being more closely matched by buyers in the market for houses sold at private sale where over the last year the vendor discount has dropped from 7.3 per cent to 6.2 per cent on a monthly basis. Homes sold at auction are not included in the days on market or vendor discounting measures as they are not relevant to fixed period campaigns and reserves are infrequently quoted. Volumes in the local auction market will increase again next week. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Is public transport infrastructure into the city as important as we once thought?

For those of us that live and work in the inner city areas of our capital cities, we think that public transport infrastructure is a must across the city. The reason being that it is essential for those of us in suburbia to be able to travel to and from the city in an efficient and timely manner, notwithstanding the fact that so many of us still drive. But in this week’s blog I question whether or not public transport is actually that important. According to data from the end of June 2013 from the Property Council of Australia, the total floor space across the CBD office markets is 17,263,536 sqm. If we were to assume that the typical office has a workspace ratio of say 20 sqm for every one worker, this would mean that if these offices were fully occupied they would house 863,177 workers. If we include the nearby fringe areas, which I have defined as: Brisbane Fringe, North Sydney, St Kilda Road, Southbank, West Perth, Crows Nest/St Leonards, Adelaide Fringe and East Melbourne, there is an additional, 4,396,603 sqm of office space. Again assuming a 1:20 ratio these offices if fully occupied would house 219,830 workers. Between the CBD and fringe office space, if we assume one worker for every 20sqm of floor area, there is enough space for 1,083,007 office workers nationally. At the moment, office vacancy rates are quite high across the country, sitting at 10.1% across the CBDs and 10.2% across these fringe office markets. Based on these figures and our ratio assumptions there are 775,945 workers within our CBD markets and 197,484 workers within the fringe areas. Of course not everybody that works in the CBD or fringe areas works in offices there will be a mixture of retail, services, industry etc that also offer employment in these areas which would also increase the overall working population in these areas. If we look at the labour force data from June 2013 we see that at a national level, there were 8,138,418 persons employed full-time and 3,519,841 persons employed part-time for a total of 11,658,258. Of course the nature of part-time employment is such that jobs are at times shared so given this I will assume that half of the part-time positions are travelled to each day reflective of job sharing resulting in my total employment figure of 9,898,338 persons. Based on this 9,898,338 persons figure and the current occupied CBD and fringe office space, these inner city area offices are providing employment for just 9.8% of the nation’s workforce. Now of course most of those people that live outside of the respective capital cities are not going to travel to the closest CBD for employment yes there are some exceptions so it is beneficial to analyse the proportion of the capital city workforce that travels to the inner city area for employment. Demographic data to June 2012 showed that 15,015,290 persons lived within a capital city which equated to 66.1% of the nation’s population. Now we know that unemployment tends to be slightly higher outside of capital cities however, if we assume simplistically that 66.1% of the 9,898,338 persons are employed within a capital city that provides a capital city employment figure of 6,542,801 persons. Based on this figure, 14.9% of all capital city jobs are situated in a CBD or fringe office markets. As I mentioned, there are other forms of employment in these area other than just that within an office. Given this, let’s assume that a further 5% of the total capital city employment is located within either the CBD or the fringe areas taking the figure to 20%, leaving 4 out of every 5 employed persons not being employed in the inner city area and therefore not having to travel centrally each day. Of course there are those that need to travel centrally that aren’t workers that would rely on public transport, this includes: students, shoppers, tourists and those who require Government services that are located within these areas. We would estimate that overall, this proportion of population is quite small. Outside of this, although users of public transport may not necessarily be travelling all the way into the inner city areas of the capital cities, they do utilise it to travel to other working and retail nodes along the transport system. Despite this, a majority of the population is unlikely to be relying on public transport to reach their destination each day with even fewer using it to tavel to the inner city areas for employment. The implications of this is quite significant, although the roads and public transport are undoubtedly congested, a large proportion of the population are simply not commuting centrally on a day-to-day basis. It also means that public transport is only benefitting a small proportion of the overall community. From a future development perspective this also has some repercussions. It is clear that in our larger capital cities there is a significant focus on densification of the inner city areas and those along transport spines. Although this is the case, demand for these higher density inner city properties is likely to be strongest amongst those who actually work centrally. In fact, it is probably fair to say that for those who do not work centrally that higher density housing in the inner city areas would likely be highly undesirable. The push for higher density in the inner city means that you can squeeze more residents into a smaller area. From Government’s perspective it also means that you can rely on existing infrastructure which tends to be most abundant in inner city areas rather than having to provide new infrastructure such as that which is required when development takes place on the outskirts of the city. Nevertheless, it certainly appears that public transport infrastructure such as rail lines and busways connecting suburbia to the inner city areas only benefits a small overall proportion of the population. Of course, of the estimated 20% of people that travel to central areas of the capital city, you only have to look at the roads of a morning to see that for many the preferred way to commute continues to be via the private car. The other aspects of public transport to consider are the cost and the coverage. The overall cost of public transport is expensive and acts as a deterrent for many to use on a more regular basis. I live in Brisbane and to travel just one zone costs $4.80 if you don’t have a go card. The trip to the city from my house is only two zones which is $5.60 by paper ticket and $3.95 if I use a go card . I live relatively close to the city centre however, if I lived four zones away and purchased a paper ticket the cost is $7.50, if you have a go card the cost reduces to $5.13. In my opinion, those costs are extremely excessive. Yes it is probably slightly cheaper than the cost of running and maintaining a car on a week-to-week basis however, the differential is likely to be minimal. My overall conclusion is that public transport is not as important as many of us believe it to be, particularly for those of us that believe we all need to have public transport to commute to work in the inner city. This analysis shows that the majority of the working population actually don’t work in the central areas which tend to be the areas best serviced by public transport. The main reasons that public transport it is not as important are due to: public transport being over-priced, services are generally irregular and unreliable and the services do not effectively cater to the overall needs of the wider community with the main focus of the service to transport people from the suburbs to the central areas of the city. If the system was expanded, run on a more regular basis and made more affordable, I am sure that it would be more widely used, especially if it was more cost effective and efficient than using a private vehicle. Sadly, at this stage it is generally a long way from delivering these benefits.

Week ending 3 November

RP Data is expecting 162 auctions in Melbourne this week and 243 across Victoria. There is a small hiatus in the auction market this week due to Derby Day and the Melbourne Cup but last weekend’s strong results shows that this won’t negatively impact the results between now and Christmas. There are seven weekends for auctions this year after this weekend and we expect volumes to remain high. Whilst there is less action in the auction market the private sale market continues to record healthy results with a drop in the days on market for houses from 38 to 36 days. Stock being prepared for market is beginning to reduce due to the proximity to the end of the year. Many vendors will be starting to plan for sales campaigns next year. Key data: Clearance rate week ending 27 October: 71.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 3 November: 162 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 27 October: 36 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 27 October: -6.4 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.8 per cent higher in month ending 27 October Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Where in Melbourne do most of the houses sell?

Over the past twelve months 4.25 per cent of all houses in Melbourne have been sold. While this result is lower than the very strong years of sales over 2007 and 2010, it still represents almost one in twenty houses. The suburbs featuring the highest number of sales in raw terms are those in the growth areas. Pakenham tops the list, followed by Point Cook, Berwick, Frankston and Craigieburn. Frankston is the wild card in the list as it is not a growth suburb. This is reflected in the fact that less than 5 per cent of Frankston houses sold over the year. The remaining suburbs recorded over 5 per cent. Accounting for suburb size some of the newer suburbs top the list. These include Wollert were over one in eight homes sold followed by Sandhurst, Lyndhurst, Brookfield and Cranbourne East. A more in depth analysis of the list shows that a few suburbs would be considered as ‘established’ but whose high proportion of sales shows they are undergoing substantial change through infill development or significant new estates. The five most significant of these are Mount Martha, Oak Park, Pascoe Vale, Port Melbourne and Aberfedlie. In the city’s north two of these suburbs undergoing a comparatively high degree of change and where large volume of sales are taking place. The small but well priced suburb of Oak Park with only 1,700 houses has seen 100 properties sold while neighbouring Pascoe Vale which is more affordable, has seen 247 of its 4,314 sold. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 27 October 2013

A clearance rate of 72.3 per cent was reached from 1,328 auction results so far this week. This is an exceptional outcome from what was the biggest week of auctions in the cities history. It is notable that despite the increased number of homes on the market the number of buyers rose to ensure a very healthy outcome. There were around 1,600 auctions held meaning more results will be added before the clearance rate is finalised later this week. The clearance rate exceeded the year to date trend and increased compared to last week. This underscores the importance of looking past single week’s results when assessing the state of the market. In the private sale market it is interesting to note that the days on market for houses dropped this week from 38 to 36 suggesting a tightening of the broader Melbourne residential market. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Results from the RP Data – Nine Rewards Survey of housing market sentiment

Is now a good time to buy a property or home? 74% of respondents believe now is a good time to be buying property. While the results show the vast majority of those surveyed think the timing to purchase a home is good, the results are a reduction from our May 2013 results where 80% of respondents thought it was a good time to purchase a home. The result is also slightly lower than a year ago when 76% of respondents thought it was a good time to be purchasing a dwelling. Across the regions the results for this question showed some diversity. Not a single respondent in the Northern Territory thought now was a good time to be buying a dwelling, perhaps reflecting a reduced level of buyer sentiment in the top end housing market. Similarly, a smaller proportion of Sydney respondents 63% thought now was a good time to be purchasing a dwelling. The May results were 10 basis points higher for Sydney at 73%. Dwelling values have moved 12.2% higher across the Sydney housing market since values bottomed out in May 2012. Many prospective Sydney buyers have either been priced out of the market or would be viewing the current level of capital gains as unsustainable. More than 80% of survey respondents thought it was a good time to be buying a home in Adelaide, Regional Western Australia, Regional Queensland and Brisbane. Is now a good time to sell a property or home? Despite the strong housing market conditions only slightly more than half of respondents thought now was a good time to be selling their home. The results are dramatically higher than a year ago when only 29% of those surveyed thought it was a good time to be selling. The strong housing market conditions in Sydney have prompted the largest proportion of respondents to suggest now is a good time to sell. About 74% of Sydney based respondents thought that now was a good time to be selling their home. Based on RP Data’s most recent weekly statistics, the typical Sydney house is selling, on average, in just 27 days, highlighting the strong selling conditions that are prevalent across this market. 65% of respondents in Melbourne thought now was a good time to be selling and 61% of Perth respondents though it was a good time to sell their home. Housing markets where capital gains have been softer, such as South Australia, Queensland and Tasmania, have prompted survey respondents to be less bullish on selling conditions. Only 23% of those surveyed in regional South Australia thought now was a good time to be selling and 29% in regional Queensland. In your opinion is Australia’s housing market vulnerable to a significant correction in values? This is the first time this question has been included in the RP Data – Nine Rewards survey. The results show 60% of survey respondents believe the Australian housing market may be vulnerable to a significant correction in values. The survey didn’t probe further about what level of value decline would be considered ‘significant’, however, it is clear that there is a level of unease about the future of Australian dwelling values. Respondents based in the Australian Capital Territory, Perth and Sydney showed the most significant level of pessimism when it came to their belief that dwelling values are vulnerable to a significant correction. 70% of respondents in the ACT thought the local housing values were vulnerable to a significant fall, as did 68% of Perth respondents and 65% of Sydney respondents. Both Sydney and Perth have seen a greater than average run up in dwelling values over the most recent growth cycle which may be contributing to the perceived threat of a downturn in home values. Conversely, respondents in Tasmania, where the housing market has been the weakest of any state or territory, are much less pessimistic. Only 36% of respondents thought the housing market was vulnerable to a significant correction in dwelling values. The proportion of pessimistic responses was below 60% for respondents based in the Northern Territory, regional NSW, Adelaide, Brisbane and regional Victoria. What is the most important factor when purchasing a property? The vast majority of respondents believe the most important factor to consider when purchasing a property is their personal financial situation at 52%. Slightly more than half of the survey participants felt this to be the most important factor when considering a property purchase. Interestingly, the housing market’s prospects for capital growth also rated quite high, with just under 20% of respondents indicating this was their most important consideration. 15% of respondents thought the interest rate setting was the most important factor, while only 10% of respondents felt that job security was their most important consideration. Do you believe home values will rise, fall or remain stable over the next 6 months? 51% of respondents were expecting home values to rise over the next six months compared with just 33% of respondents in October last year. Only 6% of respondents were expecting values to fall over the coming six months. Of those respondents who are expecting home values to rise over the next six months, their expectations of growth remain relatively measured, with just over half of those respondents that thought values would rise over the next six months indicating that growth would be between 2.5% and 4.9%. The vast majority were expecting growth to be less than 5% over the next half year. According to the 6% of respondents who think values will fall over the next six months, the largest proportion 41% are expecting the fall to be less than 2.5% and almost 75% of respondents think values will fall by less than 5% over the coming half year. Do you believe home values will rise, fall or remain stable over the next 12 months? A larger proportion of respondents believe Australian home values will rise over the next 12 months, with 57% of respondents expecting values to lift. Compared with the survey responses in October last year, only 42% of respondents were expecting home values to rise over the coming year. Of those respondents who are expecting dwelling values to rise over the coming 12 months, the vast majority 78% expect the magnitude of growth to be less than 5%. Do you believe home rental rates will rise, fall or remain stable over the next 12 months? Most respondents 55% to the survey are expecting rental rates to continue rising over the coming year, with only 4% of individuals surveyed expecting a fall in rents. Of those respondents that are expecting a rise in weekly rents over the coming year, 41% are expecting a rise of between 2.5% to 4.9% while the second largest proportion are expecting rents to rise by under 2.5% over the year. Respondents based in Northern Territory are the most bullish on rental markets, with three quarters of the respondents expecting higher rents over the next twelve months. Just under 70% of Adelaide respondents were expecting higher rents and more than 60% of respondents were expecting rents to move higher over the year in Regional NSW, Tasmania and Sydney. Residents of regional South Australia showed the lowest expectation of rental rises over the coming year, with only 38.5% of respondents indicating they were expecting rents to move higher. Fewer than half the respondents in ACT, regional Vic and Perth were expecting higher rents over the coming year.

Victoria market preview for week ending 27 October

RP Data is expecting 1,563 auctions in Melbourne this week and 1,734 across Victoria. There are 1,454 expected in Melbourne on Saturday itself. This is the most significant weekend for the auction market in Melbourne’s history with a record number of homes being offered for sale under the hammer. The very high level of listings is a sign of confidence from vendors, many of whom decided around 6 to 8 weeks ago to list for sale. They would have been influenced by the improved market and reported price rises. A clearance rate for the weekend of 70 per cent or more would be considered a good outcome. Latest housing finance data from the ABS showed that the number of first home buyers in Victoria is 9 per cent below the average over the past two years. Key market facts Clearance rate week ending 20 October: 68.6 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 27 October: 1,563 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 20 October: 38 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 20 October: -6.4 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 6 per cent higher in month ending 20 October Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Why all units and apartments in Melbourne are not the same

The top 10 list of suburbs ranked by sales of medium and high density homes is understandably dominated by the inner city but does contain two interesting exceptions. The highest number of unit and apartment sales in one suburb over the 12 months ending July according to the RP Data Suburb Scorecard was Melbourne with 1,045 transactions. It was followed by the more expensive suburb of Southbank with 596, then St Kilda, South Yarra and Docklands. Of the top 5 most transacted unit suburbs, Docklands is the most expensive with a median sale price of $590,000 and interestingly it is the only suburb out of the top five where the median unit price has fallen over the past year. The two suburbs that don’t follow the theme of being in the inner city are the much more affordable Frankston and Reservoir. In these suburbs not only are the units more affordable, with a median of $270,000 and $358,000 respectively, but they are a very different type of home compared to what is found in the inner city. They tend to have lower density and in that way are representative of very different unit and apartment market than which is commonly seen in the inner city. For buyers this is important information as it means you can’t simply compare suburbs on unit data alone. There are very divergent styles of homes within the unit and apartment category across Melbourne and they need to be assessed on an individual basis. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 20 October 2013

A clearance rate of 69.9 per cent from 981 auction results so far this week. This week’s clearance rate is broadly in line with year to date of 70 per cent, but below last weeks 74 per cent. This is the first week below 70 per cent in a few months but the variance is not unusual and is not a sign of softening demand at this stage as other weeks have seen 3 to 4 point changes in the clearance rate. In the private sale market the time on market for houses contracted moderately over the last week from 39 to 38 days whilst the vendor discount rose from – 6.0 to -6.4 per cent. Only Sydney, with 27 days and Canberra with 33 days are recording a lower average time on market for houses. Conditions in the unit market were stable with a time of market of 45 days and average vendor discount of 5.0 per cent having improved from -5.4 per cent over the previous week. New listing activity dropped from a monthly rise of 7.1 per cent to 6.0 per cent this week. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Victorian market preview for week ending 20 October

Clearance rate week ending 13 October: 74 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 20 October: 1,046 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 13 October: 39 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 13 October: -6 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 7.1 per cent higher in month ending 13 October Last week saw Melbourne record the 11th consecutive weekly clearance rate in excess of 70 per cent. RP Data is expecting 1,046 auctions in Melbourne this week and 1,168 across Victoria. This week will be followed by the largest for auctions in the state’s history with 1,628 expected, 1,500 of those in Melbourne and 1,396 on Saturday alone. These conditions will provide a high level of choice for buyers and will not only provide favorable negotiating conditions but also help with the often difficult task of finding the special home that they have been searching for. It is often forgotten that low stock levels can act to dampen the market as buyers can’t find the home that meets their needs. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Where to find the most affordable housing using RP Data’s Spring Buyer’s Guide

RP Data latest Spring Buyer’s Guide was released this week, providing an overview of key housing market statistics for every suburb that has recorded at least ten house or units sales over the past year nationally. The full report including suburb and council level tables is available for download at www.myrp.com.au/springbuyersguide. One of the interesting statistics that flows from the Guide is the percentage of suburbs across each capital city that might be considered affordable. The maps below highlight the suburbs with a median house or unit value under $300,000 and $500,000. The trends come as no surprise; it is typically the outer fringe suburbs where the most affordable housing can be found. What is a little surprising is the proportion of suburbs across each capital city where the median value of a house is less than $300,000 or $500,000. While Australia’s most affordable capital city, Hobart, shows the highest proportion 41.3% of all suburbs have median house value under $300,000 , it is Brisbane that has the second highest proportion at 15.2% followed by Adelaide at 14.4%. The depth and diversity of Brisbane suburbs for affordable housing is quite remarkable considering this is the nation’s third largest capital city. The vast majority 60% or 30 individual suburbs of these affordable suburbs can be found within the Ipswich council region which is west of the Brisbane local government area. 26% 13 suburbs of the most affordable Brisbane suburbs are located within the Logan council region while only 3 each are in the Redland and Moreton council regions and just one Inala is located within the Brisbane council area. Another surprise is that the Melbourne metro area has a slightly lower proportion of very affordable suburbs ie <$300,000 median house value than Sydney. Only 2.0% of Melbourne suburbs have a median house value below $300,000 while Sydney has recorded 2.5% of suburbs with a median house value lower than $300,000. Perth is even lower at just 1.1% demonstrating a severe lack of depth in the very affordable housing market. There is not a single suburb across Canberra where the median house value is less than $300,000. The maps below show the geography of affordability across the capital cities and of course, the full Spring Buyer’s Guide which is available to download has great deal more detail for every suburb around the nation. >

The best yield in units and apartments in Melbourne

Higher density housing is often viewed as an investment opportunity but like all property the outcome depends heavily on a range of factors. This is apparent when the suburbs of Melbourne are ranked by their indicative gross yield over the past year for units. Using the RP Data Scorecard, the data applies to the year ending September and only includes suburbs with at least 500 dwelling to reduce variability. Inner city Carlton tops the list with a yield of 6.9 per cent. The neighbouring CBD is fourth on the list with a strong 5.9 per cent which underscores why demand from investors is helping to drive the inner city high rise market. Carlton has a lower rent than the CBD with a median asking price of $360 compared to $450. The other three suburbs in the top 5 are at the more affordable end of the market from the perspective of median asking rents but still provide healthy yields. Broadmeadows has a median rent of $310 per week and a yield of 6 per cent, Melton a median rent of $255 and yield of 5.8 per cent. Neighbouring Melton South a median rent of $240 and yield of 5.6 per cent has been recorded. Does this make these suburbs good investment opportunities? That really depends on the actual property on offer and whether you are seeking a high weekly rent or a larger capital gain. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 13 October 2013

Spring continues to deliver good outcomes for vendors with a clearance rate of 73.8 per cent from 883 auctions results so far this week and a 1.3 per cent increase in home values in the last month. This week’s clearance rate is a moderate rise on the 71.3 per cent last week and 70 per cent so far this year. The market is clearly absorbing increased volumes in the auction market with little sign of diminished demand suggesting the record weekend at the end of October, when Melbourne will see 1,500 auctions, will deliver a result on trend. The latest market information from RP Data shows the overall time on market for houses sold at private sale stable at 39 days. The strongest demand in the house market is being recorded around the $500,000 level in the outer east where Croydon Hills, Bayswater North, The Basin, Scoresby, Croydon South, Boronia and Bayswater record the quickest sales in Melbourne. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Housing demand from overseas migration strong but slowing

Population growth is arguably the most important indicator of housing demand. More residents generally translate to a larger requirement for dwellings. Of course there are changes in household formation that need to be taken into account for example, more people under one roof and maximising existing bedrooms in an effort to combat housing affordability , however population growth remains the most important indicator for housing demand. Over the first three months of 2013 the Australian population increased by 114,751 new residents; close to a record high there have only been five previous quarters over the past 30 years where the population has grown by a larger amount . 36% of this population growth was attributable to natural increase ie births minus deaths while the majority of new residents came from net overseas migration. Unfortunately the quarterly demographic updates from the Australian Bureau of Statistics aren’t all that timely; in fact the statistics are about six months in arrears. The most up to date population estimates at a state/territory/national level are current to March 2013 and the June update won’t be available until December 17th. Fortunately we do have interim data on overseas arrivals and departures which is published monthly and provides a useful indicator for where overseas population growth is heading. Focussing on permanent and long term arrivals and departures data from the ABS, it is clear that overseas migration, while remaining historically high, has already passed the peak rate of growth. Over the month of August the ABS reported 53,470 permanent and long term arrivals. In balance there were 30,390 permanent and long term departures resulting in a net increase of 23,080 new permanent and long term movements. An annual summation of the overseas arrivals and departures data shows 680,200 arrival movements and 371,440 departure movements; a net gain of 308,760 permanent and long term residents/visitors who require accommodation of some description. The inflow of migrants remains high; however an examination of the annual trend shows that net migration into Australia has been slowing since commodity prices peaked back in late 2011. The last time we saw the rate of overseas migration falling away like this was in early 2009; a trend which was policy driven in response to a rising rate of unemployment. Currently, despite the improved unemployment reading for August the national rate of unemployment shifted from 5.8% in July to 5.6% in August due to a drop in the participation rate it is widely anticipated that national unemployment will continue to trend higher and is likely to peak around 6.25% according to Federal Treasury. Potentially we will see similar calls for migration policy change if unemployment continues to trend higher. The Department of Immigration and Citizenship, based on their June 2013 update, is still forecasting modest rises in net overseas migration, as can be seen in the table below extracted from their latest immigration update click here . If the Department is correct in their forecasts we should continue to see a strong rate of overseas migration which will continue to fuel the high rate of national population growth. The month to month overseas arrivals and departures data supports the notion that overseas migrants are continuing to grow in numbers, but the rate of growth has moderated since 2011. Without doubt, as unemployment moves higher we can expect more debate about whether this strong rate of migration is the correct policy for our country. Personally, I am very much pro ‘Big Australia’ but it is absolutely essential that any population growth targets run parallel with infrastructure development; something that both federal and state government have struggled with in the past. Additionally, migration targets need to be strategically matched with domestic labour shortages and aimed at sectors that will benefit from the rapid ramp up of human resources that overseas migration can provide.

Melbourne auction preview for week ending 13 October

Clearance rate week ending 6 October: 71.3 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 13 October: 970 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 6 October: 38 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 6 October: -6.2 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market are 3.3 per cent higher in month ending 6 October RP Data is expecting 970 auctions in Melbourne this week and 1,086 across Victoria. With school holidays now concluded auction volumes now lift again. The next few weeks are generally the busiest ones of the real estate year. Bentleigh East features the highest number of auctions with 20 scheduled. There are also 18 in both Glen Waverly and Reservoir. Clearance rates remain higher in Sydney, although the lower volume; 302 auction results compared to 755 in Melbourne can account for some of the difference. Activity in the mortgage market continues to rise moderately with a small 0.5 per cent rise over the past four weeks in trend terms in Victoria. This suggests that whilst the market is improving it is only doing so moderately. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne’s most tightly held suburbs

The number of homes on the market across Melbourne varies depending on the suburb with some areas providing buyers with plenty of choice while simultaneously, properties in other suburbs are being tightly held. Over the year ending July 2013 the five most tightly held suburbs in Melbourne were Oakleigh East, Glen Huntly, Princes Hill, Heidelberg and Clarinda. The data is based on sales recorded with the Valuer General in suburbs with a minimum of 500 houses. In these suburbs between 2.2 per cent and 2.6 per cent of homes has been on the market over the last twelve months. In Oakleigh East this resulted in a mere 20 homes sold from 1,417. When looking at the list in more detail, two interesting clusters of suburbs are apparent. Not only is Oakleigh East tightly held but neighbouring Oakleigh and Oakleigh South are also in the top 20. In those three suburbs there are nearly 9,000 houses of which only 159 have sold. The other cluster is for houses in Parkville, Princes Hill and Carlton. The most available of those suburbs is Carlton with only 3.1 per cent of homes offered for sale. The reasons for this will vary and it certainly is not price driven as the median prices in the Oakleigh area are between $560,000 and $640,000 whilst in the other cluster the lowest is $881,000 in Carlton. These two areas are surely the hardest places to buy a home in Melbourne. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 6th October 2013

Key metrics in the private sale and auction market are healthy with higher demand from buyers more apparent in the detached houses segment. For instance in the auction market, at this stage in 2011 the clearance rate was 55 per cent and in 2012 it was 56 per cent. This year it is 70 per cent. That trend was repeated in this week’s auction results with a preliminary clearance rate of 71.4 per cent being recorded from 755 results. Time on market for houses at private sale was 43 days in the latest monthly data from August and this was 9 days lower than the 5-year average. The unit market was showing signs of larger supply with its time on market being 48 compared to the 5 year average of 50. If the market continues to perform to trend then October will see a new nominal peak in house prices reached. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Melbourne market preview for week ending 6 October

Preliminary clearance rate week ending 29 September: NA low volume Melbourne auctions expected week ending 5 October: 826 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 29 September: 39 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 29 September: -6.2 per cent houses Listings being prepared for market: 8.6 per cent higher in month ending 29 September RP Data is expecting 826 auctions in Melbourne this week. After this week there are another 11 weekends for auctions to be held before Christmas and by using last year as a guide we can estimate around 10,000 homes will be offered at auction. Of those 10,000 auctions this years trend would suggest around 7,000 will be sold at or before the auction. The majority of those passed in will be negotiated over as the vendor and buyers seek to agree over price and terms. Across the broader market there continues to be very strong listings as Victoria lead the nation for homes being prepared for sale for the second week in a row. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Strong housing market fuels dwelling construction

The Reserve Bank’s monetary policy settings are working. Dwelling values are rising, as should be expected when mortgage rates are at historic lows. But arguably what is more important is that the renewed level of housing market confidence is showing up in improved development activity and demand for new homes. This is exactly what the doctor ordered – a ramp up in the construction sector is one of the essential elements of our new look economy where resources related investment will be lower but housing investment is expected to be higher. Dwelling approvals have been trending higher since about April 2012 which is close to the same time that the housing market bottomed out from a value depreciation perspective. Between April last year and August this year the number of dwelling approvals seasonally adjusted from the private sector has increased by close to 30% and over the past twelve months dwelling approvals are 10.3% higher for detached homes and 3.2% higher for multi-unit dwellings. The lift in development activity has a significant multiplier effect on the economy. For a start, more homes being built means more hours worked in the construction sector and more jobs. Demand for building materials rises as well as home furnishings, bulky goods, appliances and white goods. The improvement in dwelling approvals is likely to be driven by a number of factors. The overall market growth cycle will have a lot to do with it; developers and builders are more inclined to release new supply when consumer demand for housing is higher transaction numbers were about 22% higher than a year ago based on our estimates for July . Another factor would be government grants and stamp duty concession which are firmly aimed at providing incentives to purchase new homes rather than established ones. And finally there is also the strong rate of population growth which is fuelling organic demand for new housing Australia’s population grew by 1.8% over the year to March 2013 which equates to just under 400,000 new residents . The surging demand for new homes shows up clearly in the ABS housing finance commitments data. The graph below plots the number of new mortgage commitments by owner occupiers for newly built homes. Finance demand for new housing hasn’t been this high since 1979 and the number of commitments in July this year were 52% higher than a year ago. Dwelling approvals from state to state are a bit of a mixed bag though. The New South Wales region is the driving force behind the surge in dwelling approvals with the latest August data showing a 48% lift in private sector approvals compared August 2012. In July, New South Wales accounted for 28% of all private sector dwelling approvals nationally. Dwelling approvals have eased in Victoria after a surge of development approval activity in 2009/10. In fact, at their height, Victorian dwelling approvals accounted for 40% of all approvals nationally. Based on the July 2013 data, Victoria now comprises a much healthier 27% of all dwelling approvals nationally and the lower rate of dwelling approvals together with Victoria’s very high rate of population growth should help to bring reduce fears of local oversupply. With Queensland’s housing market remaining fairly depressed Brisbane values have only moved 1.1% higher over the past twelve months , developer confidence is yet to pick up. Private sector dwelling approvals have increased by 10% over the past year but remain well below the long term average. Despite the low number of approvals, population growth into Queensland remains rapid, with the state population growing by 92,300 residents over the year to March – roughly the same raw figures as New South Wales but with about a third less new housing supply coming on line. South Australia’s housing market has remained one of the weakest across the capital cities, with dwelling values 0.8% lower over the past twelve months. With such sedate housing market conditions it is surprising to see dwelling approvals rise by 30% over the past twelve months. 76% of South Australian dwelling approvals are for detached homes, highlighting the fact that the local unit market in Adelaide remains a very small proportion of the dwelling mix despite the state government offering attractive incentives to purchase new inner city units. Dwelling approvals in Western Australia have increased by 18% over the past twelve months in line with very robust housing market conditions. The rate of capital gain across Perth has recently been slowing, as has rental growth and buyer numbers appear to have peaked as well, so it may be the case that developer activity starts to mellow across WA as well. One final point on the new level of dwelling approvals is the trend towards more medium and high density product. The graph below shows the number of dwelling approvals for detached homes nationally as a proportion of all dwelling approvals. Houses now comprise around 60% of all dwelling approvals, a big shift from ten years ago where they accounted for closer to 70% of all dwelling approvals. The trend towards unit development is likely being driven by changing market preferences more empty nesters and single person households , affordability constraints units tend to be cheaper and changed zoning rules more land is zoned for medium and high density development particularly in areas closer to the city centre .

RP Data & Rismark Home Value Index shows Melbourne on track for a new peak this Spring

The recent release of the RP Data & Rismark September Home Value Index showed that Melbourne house prices recorded a strong recovery but are not yet quite at previous peak levels The index differs from a median price measure by comparing the changes in values for all properties and by taking into account the inherent differences between homes that are sold. Nationally the results confirmed that a new peak was reached and this shows the outcome of the favourable monetary policy such as current low interest rates in more affordable market coupled with rising confidence. Melbourne house values rose by 2.6 per cent in the month of September and by 5.2 per cent over the quarter. Unit values rose 1.1 per cent in the month and by 3.2 per cent in the quarter. These strong rises show that consumers are more confident and have been encouraged into the market in growing numbers. If these conditions continue it will drive further growth, however the buoyant market is also likely to encourage more owners to sell, hopefully tempering the growth in prices. It’s worth noting that they are below peak. The current peak Melbourne house value was reached three years ago in October 2010 when the index value was 667.7 compared to 654.1 in September this year. One more month like the last and the old peak will be surpassed. For units the outcome in September would need to be repeated for another two months to reach the peak of 483.4 in February 2011. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Specialist

Week ending 29th September 2013

There may have been fewer auctions this week due to the grand final but that has not prevented people buying and selling. RP Data’s preliminary results include 63 auctions reported in Melbourne this week with 53 finding a buyer. Across the broader market there have been 1,748 houses and units sold over the last week. The median sale prices have remained mostly stable with $462,000 being recorded for houses and $425,000 for units. Over the same time the daily index recorded a 2.2 per cent rise in Melbourne which was consistent with the 2.1 per cent recorded in Sydney. Over the medium term Sydney has stronger price growth as different fundamentals apply. Time on market for houses dropped from 40 to 39 days over the last week. Robert Larocca Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Buyers surging back into beach side housing markets

Lifestyle markets have been hit hard by a housing market downturn but it looks like some life is now starting to be breathed back into the coastal regions which are often synonymous with holiday homes, short term rentals and sea change migrants. I’m noticing the trend first hand; I own a house on the Sunshine Coast and watch the housing market there with a great deal of interest. More properties are being listed for sale as vendor confidence resurfaces and more homes are selling as buyer confidence improves as well. A quick look at two of the most iconic lifestyle markets where home values have been hit hard, the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast in Queensland, shows the trend quite clearly from a volume of transactions perspective: Estimated transaction numbers for houses are 60% higher on the Gold Coast compared with a year ago and unit sales are 54% higher. Sunshine Coast sales have seen a similar improvement with the estimated number of house sales 45% higher over the year and unit sales up nearly 60%. Clearly the improvement in buyer demand is moving higher from a very low base, however the rising number of sales indicates that these markets have well and truly moved through the bottom of the cycle and are back on the path to what is likely to be a long recovery, considering values across most lifestyle markets remain substantially lower than when they peaked. It’s not just the number of sales that is rising; the higher buyer demand is starting to push prices higher as well, however the upwards pressure is mostly confined to detached homes. Once again focussing on the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast for now, the Gold Coast median house price has moved 3.2% higher over the year while unit prices are down a further 4.2%. Sunshine Coast house prices are 1.3% higher over the year while unit prices were virtually stable with a 0.1% fall. As you can see from the series of lifestyle region graphs below, it has been and still is to some extent unit markets as opposed to detached housing markets where the most distress has been recorded. The reason for the more acute weakness in unit markets can likely be attributed to a couple of factors. • Pre-GFC many lifestyle markets had seen a substantial amount of unit development so there may potentially be supply issues in some markets. Additionally, with some high profile post-GFC settlements that resulted in substantial capital losses referring specifically to the Gold Coast , the public attitude towards unit developments in these locations may still be tainted. • Unit dwellings are more often owned by investors. Rental demand from both a short term tenancy ie holiday rentals and long term tenancy ie permanent rentals perspective remains sluggish in many lifestyle markets which implies less consistency in cash flow and uncertainty around yield. The graphs below cover some of the key lifestyle markets along the Eastern Seaboard and generally the trends are quite similar: rising volumes, some growth in house prices but unit prices remaining stubbornly sedate. In a market like Cairns where tourism is the primary economic pillar, housing market conditions are becoming healthier but the volume of home sales remain just less than half of what was being recorded pre-GFC. Unit prices have worn the brunt of the downturn, having fallen about 25% over the past five years. The Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast offer a great deal more economic diversity than Cairns which is probably one of the reasons why transaction numbers have held more firmly that what was recorded in Far North markets. Conditions are warming up with transaction numbers 24% higher than a year ago for houses and 27% more unit sales compared with last year. There hasn’t been a great deal of price growth just yet but with sales rising and vendor metrics improving we would expect the Sunshine Coast to continue along an upwards trajectory for prices and sales. The Gold Coast has been the poster child for distressed unit settlements over the past few years with high profile projects such as Soul, the Hilton and the Oracle making headlines for all the wrong reasons at settlement time. It seems that buyer demand is flowing back to the Gold Coast now, with transaction numbers rising and prices showing some upwards movement as well. The unit market on the Gold Coast is still seeing prices taper over the past year but I wouldn’t be surprised if this annual trend has already turned around over a more recent time period. The Tweed council area which lies directly south of the Gold Coast is seeing a similar dynamic with rising buyer demand and a glimmer of price growth in the detached housing sector. Selling conditions are improving, as demonstrated by the vendor metrics below; homes are selling slightly faster and vendors are slowing gaining some leverage with discounting levels tightening. The Byron Council region is showing a slightly different trend. Volumes are rising and selling conditions are improving, but the key difference is the fact that unit prices haven’t fallen away to as large an extent. Potentially the resilience in the unit market can be drawn back to the opposition to new housing development that has historically been the case across the Byron Shire.

Melbourne market preview for week ending 29 September

Final clearance rate week ending 22 September: 75.9 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 29 September: 64 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 22 September: 40 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 15 September: -6.3 per cent houses New listings in Victoria: 7.9 per cent higher in month ending 22 September RP Data is expecting only 80 auctions across Victoria this week with 64 in Melbourne alone. The auction market typically takes a break each year at this time to allow vendors and real estate agents to enjoy the AFL Grand Final. Incidentally there are 7 auctions scheduled in Perth with all except one on Sunday. After this weekend’s hiatus the market will enter a very busy period until Christmas on a very strong footing with 8 consecutive weeks of clearance rates in excess of 70 per cent. Over the past 4 weeks the median price of houses sold by private sale in Melbourne has been $460,000 which is only a minor variation on the $455,750 recorded a month ago. The moderate nature of price growth in Melbourne is also shown in the RP Data-Rismark Home Index which has shown a 1 per cent rise in prices over the past month. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The current Victorian market is still below its best

Two useful statistics for measuring the health of the local market, particularly the private sale one, are the number of days a dwelling is on the market for and the amount the vendor discounts the property over the course of the advertising campaign. A review of those metrics for the Melbourne private sale market for houses shows that time on market is approaching the lows of 2010 and 2007 but that vendors expectations are less likely to be matched by the market. In July the time on market was 44 days compared to 62 days a year ago and above the 36 days in September 2009. It’s worth noting that 36 days was the lowest recorded since the series begun in 2005. If the market continues to strengthen as suggested by recent consumer confidence data then this will also fall, as long as vendors’ price expectations remain in line with the market. A similar pattern is evident when looking at the level of discounting. It is commonly understood that unlike an auction, homes that sell through private sale do so for less than their advertised price, but the lower the difference the stronger the market. In July the average vendor discount was -6.5 per cent compared to -7.5 per cent a year ago and above the -4.7 per cent in January 2008. The improving trend is backed up by more recent preliminary data but does not change the underlying message that the current market is better than a year ago but still below its strongest. Buyers between now and Christmas will face more competition but still have negotiating power. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 22nd September 2013

Auction volumes were boosted last week due to the AFL Grand Final and were met with more buyers resulting in a preliminary clearance rate of 76.9 per cent compared to 72.5 per cent last week. This result is based on 862 auctions with more to be collected over the week. Whilst strong this is still lower that the 79.7 per cent in the week ending 2 June from 867 auctions. The underlying health of the market is highlighted by the fact there have now been 8 consecutive weeks with a clearance rate in excess of 70 per cent. In the private sale market indicators were stable with time on market for houses remaining at 40 days and the average vendor discount for houses increasing from 6.2 to 6.3 per cent. The number of new listings being prepared for the market continues to rise with Victoria leading the nation with a 7.9 per cent rise over the past month in seasonally adjusted terms. Next week there are only 80 auctions in Victoria. Robert Larocca Victoria Housing Market Specialist

The largest, fastest growing, fastest shrinking and most dense council regions around the country

The largest council regions: Queensland’s capital city, Brisbane, is the largest municipality in Australia. There are 1,110,473 people that live in Brisbane, comprising just fewer than 5% of Australia’s population. The second largest council, which is also in the South East corner of Queensland, is the Gold Coast where the population is less than half that of Brisbane’s at 526,173 persons. In fact, four of the top five council regions including the entirety of the ACT are located in South East Queensland; the other two are Moreton Bay and Sunshine Coast. These four council regions alone account for slightly more than 10% of the national population. Not only is the Brisbane City Council region large in both area and population, it is growing rapidly. Over the past ten years the area has increased in population by about 20,200 persons each year or nearly 1,700 new residents every month. There are some benefits of having a large council. The taxation base is larger providing some economy of scale and the urban planning and approval process tends to be much more streamlined. The fastest growing council regions: Six out of the top ten fastest growing council regions around the country are located across the Western Australia and four of them are in the Perth metro area. The Perth Council has recorded a population growth rate of 125% over the ten years to June 2012 to reach a population of roughly 19,000 residents. The population growth rate across the Perth council area remains high at 3.7% over the 2011/12 financial year, however, councils like Serpentine-Jarrahdale +8.1% , Kwinana +6.6% , Armidale +5.9% and Wanneroo +5.6% have been outpacing Perth over the most recent 2011/12 period. Rapid population growth provides both positive and negative factors for local governments. The positive is that population growth is stimulatory – more people means a larger tax base and more demand for housing which provides a multiplier effect on the local economy as higher demand for housing translates to more employment, building materials, white goods, home furnishings etc. The challenge with rapid population growth is to ensure infrastructure and local amenity keeps pace with the population. More people means more traffic, a greater requirement for public transport, health care, schooling, retail facilities etc. Delivering on infrastructure is expensive and is the area where many Governments simply fail to deliver. The fastest shrinking council regions: The regions where population growth is in significant decline can broadly be described as regional areas often associated with agriculture. Five of the top ten regions where the population is shrinking the most rapidly are located across Western Australia’s Wheat Belt. Camamah -30.1% , Dalwallinu -27.8% , Mukinbudin -27.7% and Wyalkatchem -20.6% are seeing their population dropping from an already low level. The trend towards smaller populations across these rural areas is nothing new and is likely to continue as the average population of these areas grows older and younger cohorts move away. A declining population creates other issues including a lack of social diversity. The challenge for many of these areas is to continue providing infrastructure and services across a lower taxation base. These regions are extremely large in area which compounds the costs involved in servicing the sparse population. The councils with the highest population densities: Nine of the ten most densely populated council regions are located within the Sydney metro area. The most densely populated council is Waverley where there are just over 7,500 residents per square kilometre. The council includes popular suburbs such as Bondi, Tamarama, Dover Heights, Bronte and the Waverley. About 80% of Waverly dwellings are units or semi-attached. The regions with the highest population density tend to be located very close to the central business districts of each capital city and are of course synonymous with fewer detached homes, more apartments and town houses, efficient public transport systems and wide range of facilities and social options close by.

Melbourne auction preview for week ending 22 September

Final clearance rate week ending 15 September: 72.5 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 22 September: 928 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 15 September: 40 days houses Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 15 September: -6.2 per cent houses New listings in Victoria: 6.5 per cent higher in month ending 15 September RP Data is expecting over 1020 auctions across Victoria this week with around 930 in Melbourne alone. This is the second week in a row with in excess of 1,000 auctions in Victoria and will ensure that buyers have plenty of choice. This is important as low volumes can often make it difficult for buyers to find the special home that they have been searching for. The highest volume of auctions is in Bentleigh East where there are 27 followed by 18 in Richmond and 17 in Glen Iris. Time on market for private sale of houses dropped back a small degree this week which when viewed in conjunction with the softer activity in the mortgage market shows that whilst the market is more healthy than a year ago it lacks the strength of previous upswings in 2007 and 2009/10. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Week ending 15th September 2013

This week’s preliminary clearance rate was 73.6 per cent compared to last week’s final of 74.7 per cent. This result is based on 871 auctions of residential homes with 641 selling and 230 being passed in. The spike in listings this week was a test for the auction market and it recorded a pass mark by continuing the trend of the last month and a half. The most recent interest rate reduction came at the start of August and has clearly encouraged a few more buyers into the market and helped keep the clearance rate above 70 per cent. Across both methods of sale listings are rising with a 6.5 per cent increase over the last month in Victoria on seasonally adjusted terms. Buyers conservative position is however still evident with a 3.5 per cent fall in local activity in the mortgage market. Melbourne continues to track below the very strong Sydney auction market which recorded an 84.3 per cent clearance rate this week. Robert Larocca Victoria Housing Market Specialist

Where is housing demand the strongest?

Australia’s rate of population growth is continuing to ramp up, placing consistent upwards pressure on demand for housing. The macro level demographic data is only up to date to December last year and population estimates for smaller regions such as council areas and suburbs, has only just been released current to June 2012. At a high level, based on the December 2012 demographic statistics, Australia’s population increased by 1.8% over the 2012 calendar year; the highest rate of population since December 2009. At a lower level, it is clear that the vast majority of Australia’s population growth continues to be most concentrated within the capital cities. About 66% of Australia’s population reside within one of the eight capital cities, however, the overt the 2011/12 financial year the capital cities accounted for 75% of the population growth. The rate of population growth is quite diverse from city to city and region to region. Perth is recording the highest rate of population growth at 3.6% over the 2011/12 financial year. Importantly, the City of Perth accounts for just 8.4% of Australia’s total population but over is attracting 18% of the population growth. Similarly, Australia’s third largest city, Brisbane, is home to 9.7% of Australia’s population but is recording 12.1% of the nation’s population growth. At the other end of the spectrum is Tasmania. The capital city, Hobart, is seeing its population rise by just 0.3% while the population across regional Tasmania is absolutely flat with a 0.0% change over the year. Not much demand for housing there. The maps and tables below provide a good overview about where the trends for housing demand have been most evident over the past decade.

Melbourne auction preview for week ending 15 September

Clearance rate week ending 8 September: 74.7 per cent Melbourne auctions expected week ending 15 September: 910 Melbourne private sales time on market week ending 1 September: 38 days Melbourne vendor discounting market week ending 1 September: -5.9 per cent New listings in Victoria: 5.3 per cent higher in month ending 8 September RP Data is expecting over 1,020 auctions across Victoria this week with around 910 in Melbourne alone. This will provide a substantial test for the market and the increase in stock is also mirrored in the private sale market with new listings growing in seasonally adjusted terms over the past week. As is often the case at this time of the year leading indicators point to a market slowly picking up pace with clearance rates at trend, time on market reducing for private sales and listings increasing. The test will be if this is matched by more buyers than this time last year. Robert Larocca RP Data Victoria Housing Market Specialist

RP Data Melbourne Auction comments w/e 8 September with Robert Larocca

This week’s preliminary clearance rate was 74.4 per cent compared to last week’s final of 72.1 per cent. This result is based on 441 auctions of residential homes with 328 selling, 113 being passed in. This is the 6th consecutive week with clearance rate in excess of 70 per cent. This outcome was last recorded in May 2010 and provides a further indication of a healthy market on the eve of a testing week with around 1,000 auctions. There was also a minor improvement in the private sale market with the days on market dropping from 40 to 38 over the past week and a commensurate fall in vendor discounting from 6.4 to 5.9 per cent. Melbourne’s result was lower than the Australia-wide clearance rate of 75.3 per cent due mainly to the 85.2 per cent recorded in Sydney. Robert Larocca Victorian Housing Market Specialist

Top ten tables for housing stats across the federal electorates

With the election literally just around the corner and still not a peep from the major parties on any housing policy, we thought it timely to provide a quick run-down on a few key housing metrics across the electorates. See below our top ten leagues tables by electorate.

Housing affordability affecting new home buyers and low income earners the most

The Australian Bureau of Statistics this week released a fascinating set of data; Housing Occupancy and Costs, 2011-12 see the release here . The release provides a very thorough overview about housing costs across different regions and age groups, income levels, tenure types and a wide range of other factors. The average mean cost of housing weekly across each state and nationally, as estimated by the ABS is provided below: One of the headline findings from the release is that housing costs as a proportion of gross household incomes have remained broadly unchanged since the 2003/04 financial year at about 14% see graph below . For the purposes of this study, “housing costs are the recurrent outlays by household members in providing for their shelter for themselves. The data collected on housing outlays in the SIH [Survey of Income and Housing] are limited to major outlays on housing, that is, mortgage repayments, rent, property and water rates as well as body corporate fees”. So… the costs don’t include expenses such as maintenance, repairs or insurance. Adding these costs into the scenario would likely more than double the cost of housing for those home owners who fully own their home ie they have no mortgage repayments and add about 13% to the cost of housing for those individuals paying down a mortgage. The scenario for renters of course wouldn’t change as these costs are covered by the landlord. Additionally, mortgage costs include both interest and principal payments; realistically the principal payment component should be considered as savings. The proportion of household income dedicated to housing costs is demonstrably higher across lower income households and the proportion is rising over time highlighting that financial stress is likely to be higher across these cohorts. Based on the most recent data for 2011/12 the lowest income quintile is dedicating 26% of their gross household income to housing costs compared with 22% over the 1995/95 financial year. Housing costs as a proportion of gross household income has drifted higher across all income quintiles, however the lowest earners have seen the largest increase in costs as a proportion of income. Across the different types of housing tenure, the lowest proportion of gross household income being dedicated to housing costs is evident for home owners without a mortgage at about 3%t based on the most recent data – no surprises there. This group doesn’t have the burden of mortgage repayments or rent to pay. Households paying down a mortgage showed the second lowest ratio of income to housing costs at about 18% of their gross household income, while renters are on average dedicating about 20% of the gross household income to housing costs. There’s not a great deal of difference in the proportion of gross household income dedicated to housing costs across the states. Proportionally, housing costs are the highest in the Northern Territory at 16% of household income and lowest in Tasmania where housing prices and rents tend to be much more affordable at 13%. The thing that strikes me about this release from the ABS is the low proportion of household income being dedicated to housing costs by those households paying down a mortgage. At just 14% of gross household income, it appears that the average home owner with a mortgage has a substantial buffer before they suffer mortgage stress. The old rule of thumb was that if a household is dedicating more than 30% of their gross income towards servicing a mortgage they were considered to be in ‘stress’. Based on the data, nationally, about 18% of households are dedicating more than 30% of their gross household income towards housing costs this is across the board, not just for those home owners with a mortgage and 5.6% are dedicating at least half of their income to housing costs. Clearly this 18% is where the focus needs to be from a social and affordable housing policy perspective. As can be seen in the graph below, those households dedicating 30% of their gross income or more towards housing are very much concentrated within specific lifecycle groups – particularly lone persons aged under 35, single parents and young families. The results also suggest that it isn’t so much those people that have had a mortgage for some time that find it challenging to repay mortgages, rather it is those recent first time buyers. This also potentially goes some way to explaining why first home buyer activity is currently so low at a time when mortgage rates are at virtual record low levels.

Fewer Australian real estate businesses over the 2012 financial year

The ABS released their Counts of Australian Businesses data last week. The data largely flew under the radar, but there are some interesting findings in the data that relate to the housing market and those people working within industries associated with housing either directly or indirectly. As a stark reminder about the realities of starting a new business, the data shows that of the almost 300,000 new businesses that commenced during the 2008/9 financial year, only 51% were still operating in June 2012. This is an interesting period to analyse due to the onset of the Global Financial Crisis and it is probably not a typical economic period given the severity of the global economic downturn. At a high level, the study showed there were just over 2 million businesses actively trading in Australia as at June 2012. Compared to a year prior there were about 9,000 more businesses active across the Australian business sector. Unfortunately a large component of the uplift in the number of b